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Title: Spalding's Baseball Guide and Official League Book for 1889

Author: edited by Henry Chadwick

Release Date: December, 2005 [EBook #9477]
[Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule]
[This file was first posted on October 4, 2003]

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*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK SPALDING'S BASEBALL GUIDE ***




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[Illustration: *Text included in illustration.
Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide*]




THE SPALDING TRADE MARK.

[Illustration : *Spalding trade mark*]

Experience has shown that in Base Ball and Athletic Goods, as in all other
lines of business, unprincipled persons are always eager to prey on the
reputation gained by honest dealing and good business management. We regret
to state that we have not escaped the attention of such parties, who have
appropriated our original designs, styles and names, and by using similar
illustrations and descriptions, deceive the public into believing that the
articles were manufactured by us, and that we are responsible for their
inferior quality. A wide acquaintance with sportsmen and an extended
experience with the various sports, has enabled us to anticipate the wants
of our patrons in securing outfits, and to offer only such articles as were
perfectly satisfactory for our own use, knowing by practical tests that
they would serve the purpose properly, and be unfailing to the purchaser.

In order to protect our customers, and to preserve our reputation, we have
found it necessary to place our "Trade Mark" on the higher grades of goods
that we manufacture and introduce. The care and discrimination exercised in
selecting only articles of the highest quality as being worthy of bearing
our Trade Mark, has resulted in giving to them a reputation as being
practically the best of their kind that could be produced.

In our opinion a satisfied customer is the best advertisement that we can
have, and dealers and individuals will please bear in mind that on whatever
article our TRADE MARK appears, we guarantee it to be exactly as
represented, and wherever just cause for complaint exists, we will thank
the purchaser for returning the article to us and receiving a perfect one
in return, or the refunding of the purchase money. Our line of Base Balls
is now so well known to the trade, and they are so thoroughly appreciated
by the base ball players of the country, that it seems almost unnecessary
to call special attention to their superior merits. Spalding's League Ball,
having stood the severe test of the National League for the last ten years,
and having again been adopted as the official ball of that leading
organization for 1888 as well as the other prominent professional College
and Amateur Associations, gives it a reputation and sale unequalled by any
other ball on the market. BEWARE OF CHEAP IMITATIONS; NO League Ball is
genuine without our Trade Mark on each box and ball, and the autograph of
[Illustration: *Autogram of A. G. Spalding*]
on each label.

We hope that ball players will not be misled by the remarks of interested
dealers handling inferior goods, that the articles they offer "are just as
good as Spalding's" and at a cheaper price. We accept their frequent
references to our goods as the highest compliment that can be paid us,
and only ask that purchasers will do their own comparisons, and be
convinced that our goods are really the cheapest as they certainly are the
best. Special trade prices are quoted to dealers on application.

CHICAGO. A. G. SPALDING & BROS. NEW YORK.

Publisher's Notice

       *       *       *       *       *

"Spalding's Base Ball Guide" again greets the base ball public with the
official records of America's national game. First issued in 1877, it has
grown in popularity, has been enlarged and improved from year to year, and
is now the recognized authority upon base ball matters. The statistics
contained in the "Guide" can be relied upon, nearly all of them having been
compiled from official records.

The "Guide" has attained such a size--180 pages--as to preclude the
possibility of publishing in the same issue the League Constitution in
full, and other interesting League matter. We are therefore compelled, in
addition, to publish the "Official League Book," which contains only
official League matter as furnished by Secretary Young, including the
League Constitution in full.

Copies of the "Guide" or "League Book," will be mailed to any address upon
receipt of twelve cents each. Trade orders supplied through the News
Companies, or direct from the publishers.

CHICAGO. A. G. SPALDING & BROS. NEW YORK

       *       *       *       *       *

           WASHINGTON, D. C., March 5, 1889.

  By the authority vested in me, I do hereby certify that Messrs. A. G.
  Spalding & Bros., of Chicago and New York, have been granted the
  _exclusive_ right to publish the Official League Book for 1889.

   N. E. YOUNG,
   _Secretary National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs._

DEPOTS OF SUPPLIES
FOR THE SALE OF
A. G. SPALDING AND BROS.
ATHLETIC GOODS

For the convenience of our patrons, and for the purpose of bringing our
complete line of Athletic Goods more prominently before Base Ball Players,
we have arranged with the following houses to carry at all times a complete
line of all our Athletic Goods. Their prices will be the same as ours.
Orders for goods may be sent to

WESTERN DEPOTS.

A. G. SPALDING & BROS           108 Madison St., Chicago, Ill.
E. C. MEACHAM ARMS CO.          515 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo.
J. R. HAWLEY                    164 Vine St., Cincinnati, Ohio
BURROWS BROS. CO.               23 to 27 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio
J. B. FIELD & CO.               77 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich.
V. KINDLER                      418 Genessee Ave. East Saginaw, Mich.
E. G. STUDLEY & CO.             4 Monroe St., Grand Rapids, Mich.
CHAS. MAYER & CO.               29 Washington St., Indianapolis, Ind.
A. G. PRATT & CO.               502 Wood St., Pittsburgh, Pa.
WEST BOOK & STATIONERY CO.      379 & 381 Broadway, Milwaukee, Wis.
G. B. GROSVENOR                 744 Main St., Dubuque, Iowa
J W. RECCIUS & BRO              304 Market St., Louisville, Ky.
S. G. MORTON & CO.              426 Nicollet Ave. Minneapolis, Minn.
JOURNAL PUBLISHING CO.          Helena, Montana
COLLINS GUN CO.                 1312 Douglas St., Omaha, Neb.
M. F. KENNEDY & BROS            66 East 3d St., St, Paul, Minn
GEO. F HIGGINS & CO.            354 16th St., Denver, Col.
F. M. MENGES Sporting Goods CO. 924 Main St Kansas City, Mo.
WM. BECK & SON 165 2d St.       Portland, Oregon
REDHEAD, NORTON, LATHROP & CO.  Des Moines, Iowa
TUFTS. LYON ARMS CO.            Los Angeles, Cal.

EASTERN DEPOTS.

A. G. SPALDING & BROS           241 Broadway, N. Y.
E. W. VINE                      1 Green St., Albany, N. Y.
S G. LEVALLEY                   189 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y.
RHODE ISLAND NEWS CO.           113 Westminster St., Providence, R.I.
SCRANTOM, WETMORE & Co          10 State St., Rochester, N. Y.
R. WOOD'S SONS                  72 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y.
M. W. BULL & Co                 445 Main St., Springfield, Mass.
M. C. EBBECKE & Co              Allentown, Pa.
M. A. TAPPAN                    1013 Pennsylvania Ave, Washington, D. C.
VON LENGERKE & DETMOLD          Newark, N. J.

SOUTHERN DEPOTS.

F. F. HANSELL & BRO             28 and 30 Camp St., New Orleans, La.
A. J. ANDERSON                  2d and Houston Sts. Fort Worth, Texas
R. M. MANSFORD                  293 Main St., Memphis, Tenn.
BIRMINGHAM ARMS Co              Birmingham, Ala.
H. DREW & BRO                   Jacksonville, Fla.
J. W. SAWYER                    Key West, Fla.

FOREIGN DEPOTS.

McLEAN BROS & RIGG, Limited     Sydney, Australia
McLEAN BROS & RIGG, Limited     Adelaide, Australia
BOYLE & SCOTT                   Melbourne, Australia
W. MCARTHUR & Co                Auckland, N. Z.
THOS. LACK                      Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands
THE HINGSTON-SMITH ARMS Co      Winnipeg, Manitoba
C. FLOOD & SONS                 St. Johns, N. B.

LOCAL AGENCIES.

WESTERN.

A. G. CASE                      Aurora, Ill.
C. E. DALTON                    Bloomington, Ill.
A. P. CUNNINGHAM                Champaign, Ill.
C. H. CARYL                     Kalamazoo, Mich.
SPENCER BROS                    Marquette, Mich.
JOHN T. BUKER                   Rockford, Ill.
BAKER & WATSON                  Terre Haute, Ind.
GREGORY & Co                    Winona, Minn.
J. A. ELLIOTT                   Danville, Ill.

EASTERN.

N. A. FROST                     Hanover, N. H.
G. W. BLODGETT & Co             Amherst, Mass.
TALBOT BROS                     Pittsfield, Mass
J. W. BRINE                     New Haven, Ct.
C. S. WEST                      Flushing, L. I.
J. W. BRINE                     Cambridge, Mass.
A. H. POMEROY                   Hartford, Ct
HIRST & LEACH                   Princeton, N. J.
A. W. SCOTT                     Stamford, Ct.
BRENNAN & DAVIS                 Bradford, Pa.
F. A. CLAPP & Co                Worcester, Mass.
GEO. DART                       Tuxedo, N. Y.


WILLIAM A. HULBERT.

The late Mr. William A Hulbert may be justly considered as the Father of
the National League, for he it was who in 1875 was mainly instrumental in
bringing about the secession from the old National Professional Association
in 1875 which resulted in the establishment of the National League in 1876.
To Mr. Hulbert is due the credit of rescuing professional ball playing from
the abuses which prevailed in the ranks at the time he first became
connected with the Chicago Club. Especially to his persistent course in
refusing to consent to the reinstatement of any player expelled from a
professional club for crooked play, is the present honesty of the game due.
Mr. Hulbert was the second President of the National league, Mr. M G
Bulkely, the present Governor of Connecticut, being the League s first
President. Mr. Hulbert died in April, 1882 from heart disease. He was
essentially a reformer and in his business and social relations sincerity
and candor were marked characteristics. The National League adopted this
resolution at his death: _Resolved_ That to him alone is due the credit of
having founded the National League, and to his able leadership, sound
judgment and impartial management is the success of the League chiefly due.


SPALDING'S BASE BALL GUIDE AND
Official League Book for 1889.

A complete hand book of the national game of base ball,

CONTAINING

Statistical reviews of the various professional association championship
seasons, as also the records and averages of the inter-collegiate
associations, east & west.

ADDED TO WHICH IS THE

COMPLETE OFFICIAL LEAGUE RECORD FOR 1888.

ALSO

_Brief Record of the Base Ball Tours to England in 1874 and to Australia
in 1888._

TOGETHER WITH

The new code of playing rules, as revised by the committee of conference.

Attached to which is an official explanatory appendix, giving a correct
interpretation of the new rules, also the official record of all league
games and players, and the official schedule of league games for 1889,
pitchers' records in victories for 1888.

Base running and throwing records of 1888, with the leading noteworthy
events. Records of the veteran batsmen of the league from 1876 to 1888.

_Handsomely Illustrated with Portraits and Pictures_

[Illustration: Boston Grounds.]

[Illustration: CORRECT DIAGRAM OF A BALL GROUND.]

[Illustration: PHILADELPHIA GROUNDS]

The publishers of "Spalding's Base Ball Guide" present to the fraternity in
the GUIDE for 1889, the model baseball annual of the period; the thirteenth
annual edition of the work being in every respect the most complete
baseball GUIDE ever issued. Exceeding as it does every other book of the
kind in size--over two hundred pages of reading matter --as also in its new
feature of pictorial illustrations, it presents an epitome of the
professional history of the game for 1888, unequaled by any other work of
the kind previously published. In fact, the GUIDE for 1889 has been made to
conform to the very exceptional year of important events its chapters
record--a year which will be remembered for a long time to come as fruitful
of the most noteworthy occurrences known in the annals of our national
game.

The prominent features of the GUIDE for 1889 are the complete record of
the pitching in the League and American championship contests; the
instructive chapters on "the lessons of the campaign," then on "team
work;" the analyses of the play in the world's championship series of
contests; the new tables showing the figures of the campaigns of the past
eighteen years, and especially the explanatory appendix or chapter of
official instructions to umpires and captains.

The great size of the GUIDE precludes the possibility of including the
games record of the League campaign, as also other records of League
legislation, etc., and these will be found in the "Official League Book,"
which contains only official League matter as furnished by Secretary
Young, including the League Constitution in full.

[Illustration: CHICAGO GROUNDS.]

The American national game of base ball has reached a period in its
history, when it no longer needs to be referred to as a field exercise,
calling for particular mention of its peculiar merits. It is now the
established favorite game of ball of the American people, and occupies a
position in public estimation which no other field sport in vogue
approaches. The game has attained its present position of popularity, not
only from its adaptability to our peculiar national characteristics, as
regards its possession of special points of attraction; but also from its
value as a field sport which presents sufficient excitement in itself to
draw thousands of spectators, without the extrinsic aid of betting as its
chief point of interest, the latter attraction being something which
pertains to nearly every other popular sport. Then, too, it should be
borne in mind that base ball first taught us Americans the value of
physical exercise as an important aid to perfect work in cultivating the
mind up to its highest point. It is to the introduction of base ball as a
national pastime, in fact, that the growth of athletic sports in general
in popularity is largely due; and the game pointed out to the mercantile
community of our large cities that "all work and no play" is the most
costly policy they can pursue, both in regard to the advantages to their
own health, and in the improvement in the work of their employees, the
combination of work and play judiciously, yielding results in better work
and more satisfactory service than was possible under the old rule. Thus,
the game has acted like a lever in lifting into public favor all athletic
sports.

A great deal is said about the special attraction of this and that
leading sport of the day. The turfman thinks there is nothing approaching
the excitement of a horse race, which from the start to the finish
occupies but a few minutes of time. The rower regards a three mile "shell"
race as the very acme of sporting pleasures; while the yachtsman looks
upon all other contests as of trifling importance compared with that
ending in the winning of his club regatta cup; and so on through the whole
category of sports of the field, the forest and the river. But if any one
can present to us a sport or pastime, a race or a contest, which can in
all its essentials of stirring excitement, displays of manly courage,
nerve and endurance, and its unwearying scenes of skillful play and
alternations of success equal our national game of ball, we should like to
see it.

What can present a more attractive picture to the lover of out door
sports than the scene presented at a base ball match between two trained
professional teams competing for championship honors, in which every point
of play is so well looked after in the field, that it is only by some
extra display of skill at the bat, that a single run is obtained in a full
nine innings game? If it is considered, too, that base ball is a healthy,
recreative exercise, suitable for all classes of our people, there can be
no surprise that such a game should reach the unprecedented popularity it
has.


THE PROFESSIONAL SEASON OF 1888.

The season of 1888, in the professional arena, was marked by several
events which placed it on record as the most noteworthy, known in the
thirteen years' history of the National League. In the first place it was
the inaugural year of the grand movement made by the President of the
Chicago Club, to extend the popularity of our national game beyond the
American continent; an event which exhibited the characteristic energy,
pluck, liberality and business enterprise of Mr. Spalding, in a very
marked manner; the grand success which the venture met with being a well
merited reward for the large financial outlay which he incurred in the
experiment. Secondly, the struggle for the championship of the League,
resulting as it did in the success of the New York club, gave to the East
a lead in the pennant races which they had not held since 1884, when the
Providence club won the championship, Chicago having held the honors in
1885 and 1886, and Detroit in 1887. The past season, too, excelled all
previous years in the vast assemblages of spectators who were gathered at
the grounds of the prominent clubs on holiday occasions; as also in the
immense aggregate of people who patronized the professional contests of
the year. It was also an exceptional year in regard to the close and
exciting contest for the League pennant, between the four leading clubs of
that organization; and at the end of the championship season the sequel of
the contest for the base ball championship of the world finished off the
campaign of 1888, in a manner that greatly added to the honors won by the
victorious League club from New York. The contest for the American
Association championship was also one of the interesting events of the
season, and one, too, which taught aspiring clubs a lesson which they can
well profit by; and that is, that success in championship contests is due
far more to able management, competent captaining, and thorough team work,
than to the gathering together of the strongest of star players in a club
team. In the League, in this respect, while the Boston club had invested,
at great financial cost, in securing the services of noted star players,
the Chicago club, though weakened by the release of players from their
team who had done yeoman service in their ranks for years, were yet able
to excel the picked team of star players of the Boston club, simply by
superiority in handling those they had left to them. In the Association
arena, too, a similar condition of things prevailed in the case of the St.
Louis and Brooklyn clubs, the costly investment of the Brooklyn club for
new players, only enabling them to reach second place in the pennant race,
while the "weakened"(?) St Louis team, by better conceited work together
were enabled to break the record by capturing the Association pennant for
the fourth successive season, something only equaled by the Boston club
under the reign of the old National Association in 1872, '73, '74, and '75.

An event of the season of 1888, also, was the widening the sphere of
professional club operations in the United States, by the inauguration of
the Texas League, which, though not as successful as desired in its first
year, nevertheless opened up a new and large territory for the occupation
of the professional clubs.  Closing too, as the year did with a
commendable movement on the part of the League legislators to regulate the
salary system so as to get rid of several costly abuses; it may be justly
said that in no year since professional ball playing was officially
recognized, was there so much done to promote the welfare of the national
game as during the season of 1888.

The summary record of the season's work of the several professional
Leagues and Association prominent during the season of 1888, is as follows:

                   |Champion    |Games    |Per Cent. of
Leagues            |Club.       |Played   |Victories
-------------------+------------+---------+----------
National League    |New York    | 532     | .641
American           |            |         |
Association        |St. Louis   | 540     | .681
International      |            |         |
Association        | Syracuse   | 433     | .718
Western            |            |         |
Association        | Des Moines | 458     | .648
Central League     | Newark     | 4*6[A]  | .783
Southern League    | Birmingham | 101     | .620
New England League | Lowell     | 209     | .566
California League  | Stockton   | 268     | .615
Texas League       | Dallas     | 146     | .660
Tri-State League   | Lima       | 538     | .701

[**Proofreaders note A: * indecipherable number**]

                           |    Number of Clubs.
                           | Began the   | Ended the
Leagues                    | Season.     | Season.
---------------------------+-------------+---------
National League            |           8 |      8
American Association       |           8 |      8
International Association  |           8 |      8
Western Association        |           8 |      7
Central League             |           8 |      7
Southern League            |           4 |      4
New England League         |           7 |      4
California League          |           4 |      4
Texas League               |           6 |      4
Tri-State League           |          10 |     10


THE LEAGUE'S PENNANT RACE OF 1888.

The championship campaign of the League for 1888 began on April 20, with
the customary home games between the eight clubs, each in its respective
section, the New York team opening the season at Washington, and the
Bostons at Philadelphia; while in the West Detroit opened at Pittsburg,
and the Chicagos at Indianapolis, the winning clubs being New York,
Boston, Pittsburg and Chicago. By the end of the first week of the
campaign, Boston was in the van without a defeat being charged to them,
while every other club had suffered at least one defeat, Boston leading in
the race, followed by Chicago, New York, Pittsburg, Detroit, Indianapolis,
Washington and Philadelphia, the latter suffering from the great drawback
of the death of their best player Ferguson, a loss which handicapped them
all through the season. By the end of the first week in May the contest
had assumed quite an interesting phase in one respect, and that was the
remarkable success of the Boston team, which, up to May 2 had won every
championship game they had played, the record on May 4 leaving them in the
van. By May 5, however, Chicago pulled up even with them, the two teams
standing with a record of 11 victories and 2 defeats each, and a
percentage of .862 at the close of the third week of the spring campaign.
In the meantime Philadelphia had rallied and had pulled up to seventh
place, and Detroit had overhauled Pittsburg, Indianapolis falling into the
last ditch. By the end of May quite a change had been made in the relative
position of the eight clubs, Chicago having gone to the front and Boston
to second position, while Detroit had moved up to third place, and New
York had fallen back to fourth; while Philadelphia had worked up well and
had got into fifth position, Pittsburg having made a bad tumble to sixth
place, leaving Indianapolis and Washington to bring up the rear.

The month of June saw more changes in the positions of all of the eight
clubs except Chicago and Philadelphia, the former having tenaciously held
on to first place since the last week in April; while Philadelphia
steadily remained a good fifth. Boston, however, fell off badly in the
running, the second week in June seeing, them down to fourth place; while
by June 9 Detroit had got into second place, and was running Chicago a
close race. During the last of May New York had got down to fourth
position; but in the first week of June they had rallied and resumed third
place; but the next week saw them fall back again, while Boston rallied
back to third position. By the end of June the eight clubs occupied the
following relative positions in the race Chicago held the lead, with
Detroit second, Boston third, New York fourth, Philadelphia fifth,
Pittsburg sixth, with Indianapolis and Washington as the two tail enders.

July proved to be the most important month of the season's race, as it
was in this month that the New York team as effectually rallied under the
personal influence of Mr. John B. Day, who from that time out took
personal cognizance of the doings of the "Giants." The first week in July
saw the New York team drive Boston out of third place, while Pittsburg,
for the time being, was forced to occupy seventh position, Indianapolis
leading them for a week in July. During the last week in July, Chicago --
which club had held the lead consecutively from May 5 to July 23--took a
bad tumble, and fell back to third position, while New York and Detroit
stood tied for a few days for first place, until Chicago rallied, and then
the Detroits were driven back; the end of July leaving New York in the
van, with Detroit second, Chicago third, Boston and Philadelphia close
together in fourth and fifth positions, while Pittsburg, Indianapolis, and
Washington occupied the rear positions. It was now that the race began to
be intensely interesting. The steady play of the New York team gave a new
feature to the contest, and it now began to be a nip and tuck fight
between the "Giants" and the Chicagos for first place, with Detroit close
to them as a good third. August saw the steadiest running of the season in
the race, but few changes being made in the relative positions of the
contestants, the last week of the month seeing New York in the van,
Chicago second, Detroit third, Boston fourth, Philadelphia fifth, and
Pittsburg, Washington and Indianapolis in the rear.

The promise for an exciting close of the campaign loomed up very bright
in September, and during that month, while New York and Chicago still
retained their leading positions, Boston temporarily rallied, and got into
third place for a week; but Detroit pushed them back, while Philadelphia
began to rally for a closing dash for one of the three leading positions.
At the close of September the record left New York in the van, with the
assurance of a successful termination of the campaign for the "Giants,"
while the struggle for second place between Chicago, Boston, Detroit and
Philadelphia greatly added to the excitement of the closing month of the
campaign. Chicago held on to second place, and Philadelphia, which club on
September 29 stood in fifth place rallied brilliantly in October, and
drove Boston to fourth place and Detroit to fifth, Boston having occupied
fifth place on the 6th of October, Pittsburg, Indianapolis and Washington
finally bringing up the rear.

A feature of the campaign was the fact that at no time after May was it
doubtful in regard to the position of Pittsburgh, Indianapolis and
Washington as the three tail-enders of the race. But for this the campaign
would have been the most brilliant on record. As it was, however, the
contest for the three leading positions by the other five clubs made it
exceedingly interesting throughout, New York's final success giving a new
impetus to the succeeding campaign of 1889.

THE STATISTICS OF THE CAMPAIGN.

During the League championship season of 1888 an aggregate of 552 games
were played, of which 530 were victories and defeats; and 22 were drawn
games, and two were won by forfeit. Of the 552 games played and won, no
less than 432 were won by single figure scores, and but 98 by double
figures. A noteworthy feature of the campaign was, that while the New York
Club won the championship by 84 victories to Chicago's 77, with but 47
defeats to Chicago's 58, they failed to score as many runs in the
aggregate as the Chicago Club did by 659 to 725, the Chicago's majority of
runs being 66. The New York Club's score of runs, in fact, was exceeded by
Detroit, Boston, and even Indianapolis, the latter's aggregate of runs
being 666.

Below will be found a complete summary of the statistics of the League
campaign of 1888:

                        |    |    | P  |    |    |    | I  |
                        |    |    | h  |    |    |    | n  |
                        |    |    | i  |    |    |    | d  | W
                        |    |    | l  |    |    | P  | i  | a
                        | N  |    | a  |    |    | i  | a  | s
                        | e  | C  | d  |    | D  | t  | n  | h
                        | w  | h  | e  | B  | e  | t  | a  | i
                        |    | i  | l  | o  | t  | s  | p  | n
                        | Y  | c  | p  | s  | r  | b  | o  | g
                        | o  | a  | h  | t  | o  | u  | l  | t
                        | r  | g  | i  | o  | i  | r  | i  | o
                        | k  | o  | a  | n  | t  | g  | s  | n
                        | .  | .  | .  | .  | .  | .  | .  | .
------------------------+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+--
Victories               |  84|  77|  69|  70|  68|  66|  50|  48
Defeats                 |  47|  58|  61|  64|  63|  68|  85|  86
Drawn Games             |   7|   1|   1|   3|   3|   4|   1|   2
Total Games Played      | 138| 135| 131| 137| 134| 138| 136| 136
Won by Forfeit          |   1|   0|   1|   0|   0|   0|   0|   0
Lost by Forfeit         |   0|   1|   0|   0|   0|   1|   0|   0
Per Cent. of Victories  |.641|.570|.532|.522|.519|.493|.370|.358
Series Won              |   5|   4|   2|   2|   3|   2|   1|   0
Series Lost             |   1|   1|   2|   2|   1|   1|   6|   5
Series Tied             |   0|   1|   0|   0|   2|   1|   0|   0
Series Unfinished       |   6|   4|   6|   4|   5|   3|   3|   5
Chicago Victories       |  19|  13|  16|   7|  10|  13|   6|   6
Chicago Defeats         |   3|   9|   7|  13|   5|  19|  11|  23
Home Victories          |  44|  43|  37|  34|  41|  38|  31|  26
Home Defeats            |  23|  26|  31|  29|  26|  30|  35|  38
Victories Abroad        |  40|  34|  32|  36|  27|  28|  19|  22
Defeats Abroad          |  24|  32|  30|  31|  37|  70|  50|  48
Extra Innings Victories |   2|   1|   8|   6|   3|   6|   3|   0
Extra Innings Defeats   |   2|   1|   3|   8|   6|   0|   5|   4
Single Figure Victories |  70|  55|  62|  58|  50|  57|  37|  44
Single Figure Defeats   |  44|  45|  55|  49|  51|  58|  67|  65
Double Figure Victories |  12|  22|   6|  12|  18|   9|  13|   4
Double Figure Defeats   |   4|  12|   6|  15|  12|  10|  18|  21
Batting Average         |.240|.247|.229|.240|.243|.223|.233|.207
Fielding Average        |.918|.906|.919|.904|.916|.914|.904|.899
Highest Score in Games  |  19|  21|  17|  20|  18|  14|  15|  22
Worst Defeat            |4-11|0-14|1-14|0-13|2-12|1-16|0-13|0-14
Won by One Run          |  21|  18|  28|  16|  10|  10|  13|  12
Lost by One Run         |  12|   7|  16|  21|  19|  16|  28|  17
Total Runs Scored       | 659| 725| 536| 669| 716| 531| 666| 482

The following is the record of the single figure victories scored in the
League championship arena in 1888:

SINGLE FIGURE|   |   | P |    |   |   | I |   ||
VICTORIES.   |   |   | h |    |   |   | n |   ||
             |   |   | i |    |   |   | d | W ||
             |   |   | l |    |   | P | i | a || V
             | N |   | a |    |   | i | a | s || i
             | e | C | d |    | D | t | n | h || c
             | w | h | e | B  | e | t | a | i || t
             |   | I | l | o  | t | s | p | n || o
             | Y | c | p | s  | r | b | o | g || r
             | o | a | h | t  | o | u | l | t || i
             | r | g | i | o  | i | r | i | o || e
             | k | o | a | n  | t | g | s | n || s
             | . | . | . | .  | . | . | . | . || .
-------------+---+---+---+----+---+---+---+---++---
New York     | --| 12| 10|8[1]|  5| 11| 13| 11|| 70
Philadelphia |  4| --|  9| 5  |  8|  7|  9| 10|| 60
Boston       |  8|  9| --| 9  |  5|  6| 12|  9|| 58
Pittsburg    |  7|  6|  7| -- |  8|  8|  8| 13|| 57

[**Proofreaders note: The data for the last two teams was not included**]

[Footnote 1: One victory scored by New York was from a forfeited game
charged against the Pittsburg team as 9 to 0.]

The following is the record of the double figure victories scored by the
eight League clubs in the championship arena in 1888:

DOUBLE FIGURE|   |   |   | I |   |   | P |   ||
VICTORIES.   |   |   |   | n |   |   | h |   ||
             |   |   |   | d |   |   | i | W ||
             |   |   |   | i |   | P | l | a || V
             |   |   | N | a |   | i | a | s || i
             | C | D | e | n |   | t | d | h || c
             | h | e | w | a | B | t | e | i || t
             | i | t |   | p | o | s | l | n || o
             | c | r | Y | o | s | b | p | g || r
             | a | o | o | l | t | u | h | t || i
             | g | i | r | i | o | r | i | o || e
             | o | t | k | s | n | g | a | n || s
             | . | . | . | . | . | . | . | . || .
-------------+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++----
Chicago      | --|  3|  0|  4|  4|  3|  1|  7|| 22
Detroit      |  1| --|  2|  5|  2|  4|  2|  2|| 18
New York     |  3|  0| --|  3|  2|  1|  2|  2|| 13
Indianapolis |  1|  2|  0| --|  5|  1|  0|  4|| 13
Boston       |  2|  4|  0|  2| --|  1|  0|  3|| 12
Pittsburg    |  3|  2|  0|  1|  1| --|  0|  2||  9
Philadelphia |  1|  0|  1|  3|  1|  0| --|  1||  7
Washington   |  1|  1|  1|  0|  0|  0|  1| --||  4
-------------+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++----
Defeats      | 12| 12|  4| 18| 15| 10|  6| 21|| 89

The following table presents the figures of the _series_ of games won and
lost in the League championship arena in 1888. The letters "W" and "L"
indicate games won and lost:

            |     |     |  P  |     |     |     |  I  |     || |
            |     |     |  h  |     |     |     |  n  |     ||S|S
            |     |     |  i  |     |     |     |  d  |  W  ||S|e|e
            |     |     |  l  |     |     |  P  |  i  |  a  ||e|r|r
            |  N  |     |  a  |     |     |  i  |  a  |  s  ||r|i|i
            |  e  |  C  |  d  |     |  D  |  t  |  n  |  h  ||i|e|e
            |  w  |  h  |  e  |  B  |  e  |  t  |  a  |  i  ||e|s|s
            |     |  i  |  l  |  o  |  t  |  s  |  p  |  n  ||s| |
            |  Y  |  c  |  p  |  s  |  r  |  b  |  o  |  g  || |L|T
            |  o  |  a  |  h  |  t  |  o  |  u  |  l  |  t  ||W|o|i
            |  r  |  g  |  i  |  o  |  i  |  r  |  i  |  o  ||o|s|e
            |  k  |  o  |  a  |  n  |  t  |  g  |  s  |  n  ||n|t|d
            |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  ||.|.|.
------------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----++-+-+-
            | W| L| W| L| W| L| W| L| W| L| W| L| W| L| W| L|| | |
New York    |--|--| 8|11|11| 7|10| 7|14| 5|12| 8|14| 5|15| 4||5|1|0
Chicago     |11| 8|--|--|10|10| 9|11| 8|10|12| 7|14| 6|13| 6||4|1|1
Detroit     | 7|11|10|10|--|--|10|10|11| 7| 8|10|11| 8|11| 7||3|1|2
Pittsburg   | 7|10| 1| 9|10|10|--|--| 6|11| 8|10|14| 6|10| 9||2|1|1
Philadelphia| 5|14|10| 8| 7|11|14| 6|--|--|10| 9|13| 4|10| 9||2|2|0
Boston      | 8|12| 7|13|10| 8|10| 8| 9|10|--|--|11| 9|15| 5||2|2|0
Indianapolis| 5|14| 6|14| 8|11| 6|14| 4|13| 9|11|--|--|12| 9||1|6|0
Washington  | 4|15| 6|13| 7|11| 9|10| 9|10| 5|15| 8|12|--|--||0|5|0

THE "CHICAGO" GAMES OF 1888.

The record of the "Chicago" games--or games in which the defeated team
did not score a single run--in the League championship series of 1888 is
appended:

            |   | P |   |   |   |   | I |   ||
            |   | h |   |   |   |   | n |   ||
            |   | i |   |   |   |   | d | W ||
            |   | l |   | P |   |   | i | a || V
            | N | a |   | i |   |   | a | s || i
            | e | d | C | t | D |   | n | h || c
            | w | e | h | t | e | B | a | i || t
            |   | l | i | s | t | o | p | n || o
            | Y | p | c | b | r | s | o | g || r
            | o | h | a | u | o | t | l | t || i
            | r | i | g | r | i | o | i | o || e
            | k | a | o | g | t | n | s | n || s
            | . | . | . | . | . | . | . | . || .
------------+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++---
New York    | --|  1|  2|  4|  2|  1|  3|  6|| 19
Philadelphia|  0| --|  3|  6|  1|  4|  0|  2|| 16
Chicago     |  1|  1| --|  3|  1|  2|  1|  4|| 13
Pittsburg   |  1|  2|  1| --|  0|  2|  4|  3|| 13
Detroit     |  0|  1|  2|  1| --|  2|  1|  3|| 10
Boston      |  1|  0|  0|  3|  0| --|  1|  2||  7
Indianapolis|  0|  0|  1|  0|  1|  1| --|  3||  6
Washington  |  0|  2|  0|  2|  0|  1|  1| --||  6
------------+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++---
Defeats     |  3|  7|  9| 19|  5| 13| 11| 23|| 90

EXTRA INNINGS GAMES.

The record of the victories and defeats scored by the eight League Clubs
in extra innings games in the championship series of 1888 was as follows:

Date.   |Contesting      |Cities.     |Pitchers. |In's.|Scr.
        |Clubs.          |            |          |     |
--------+----------------+------------+----------+-----+
Sept.  1|Philadelphia    |Philadelphia|Sanders   |     |
        | v. Wash'n      |            |Widner    |  12 |  2-0
July  30 |Philadelphia   |Boston      |Buffinton |     |
        | v. Boston      |            |Sanders   |  11 |  4-3
July  31|Philadelphia    |Boston      |Sanders   |     |
        | v.   "         |            |Clarkson  |  11 |  6-5
Sept. 22|Philadelphia    |Indianapolis|Sanders   |     |
        | v. In'polis    |            |Healy     |  11 |  6-5
May   26|Philadelphia    |Boston      |Buffinton |     |
        | v. Boston      |            |Madden    |  10 |  1-0
Aug.  11|Philadelphia    |Philadelphia|Casey     |     |
        | v. Detroit     |            |Getzein   |  10 |  1-0
Aug.  13|Philadelphia    |Philadelphia|Buffinton |     |
        | v. In'polis    |            |Burdick   |  10 |  2-1
Aug.   9|Philadelphia    |Philadelphia|Casey     |     |
        | v. Detroit     |            |Getzein   |  10 |  6-5
April 20|Pittsburg       |Pittsburg   |Morris    |     |
        | v. Detroit     |            |Getzein   |  12 |  5-2
Aug.   1|Pittsburg       |Chicago     |Galvin    |     |
        | v. Chicago     |            |Baldwin   |  12 |  6-4
Sept. 21|Pittsburg       |Pittsburg   |Morris    |     |
        | v. Boston      |            |Radbourne |  10 |  2-1
Sept.  3|Pittsburg       |Indianapolis|Morris    |     |
        | v. Indianap's  |            |Healy     |  10 |  5-4
Sept.  4|Pittsburg       |Indianapolis|Galvin    |     |
        | v. Indianap's  |            |Boyle     |  10 |  5-4
May   10|Pittsburg       |Pittsburg   |Morris    |     |
        | v. Boston      |            |Clarkson  |  10 | 11-10
June 28 |Boston          |Boston      |Sowders   |     |
        | v. Washington  |            |O'Day     |  14 |  9-7
Aug.  15|Boston          |Boston      |Radbourne |     |
        | v. Detroit     |            |Beatin    |  12 |  4-3
April 21|Boston          |Washington  |Clarkson  |     |
        | v. Washington  |            |O'Day     |  11 |  1-0
June  19|Boston          |Washington  |Sowders   |     |
        | v. New York    |            |Keefe     |  11 |  8-7
April 30|Boston          |New York    |Clarkson  |     |
        |v. New York     |            |Welch     |  10 |  4-3
April 28|Boston          |Washington  |Sowders   |     |
        | v. Washington  |            |Daily     |  10 |  4-3
July  30|Indianapolis    |Detroit     |Burdick   |     |
        | v. Detroit     |            |Getzein   |  11 |  6-5
July  31|Indianapolis    |Detroit     |Healy     |     |
        | v. Detroit     |            |Conway    |  11 |  7-5
July   6|Indianapolis    |Indianapolis|Boyle     |     |
        |v. Ph'd'phia    |            |Casey     |  11 |  9-8
June   8|Detroit         |Boston      |Getzein   |     |
        | v. Boston      |            |Clarkson  |  16 | 11-5
May   12|Detroit         |Detroit     |Conway    |     |
        |v. Philadelphia |            |Gleason   |  12 |  3-1
July   2|Detroit         |Indianapolis|Conway    |     |
        |v. Indianapolis |            |Healy     |  12 |  4-3
July  24|New York        |New York    |Welch     |     |
        | v. Boston      |            |Madden    |  13 |  6-3
July  28|New York        |New York    |Keefe     |     |
        | v. Philadelphia|            |Sanders   |  10 |  4-2
June   6|Chicago         |Boston      |Van Halt'n|     |
        | v. Boston      |            |Radb'rn  e|  10 |  3-2

DRAWN GAMES.
Date. |Contesting Clubs.    |Cities.   | Pitchers.     |In's.|Scr.
------+---------------------+----------+---------------+-----+----
Apr 23|New York v. Was'ngt'n|Washingt'n|Welch     O'Day|  13 | 1-1
Aug 13|Chicago v. New York  |New York  |Baldwin   Welch|  12 | 5-5
Sept 3|Philadelphia v N York|New York  |Sanders   Keefe|  11 | 0-0
May 15|New York v. Pittsburg|Pittsburg |Keefe    Galvin|  11 | 3-3
Aug  8|Pittsburg v. Boston  |Boston    |Morris  Sowders|  11 | 3-3
Sep 28|Detroit v. New York  |New York  |Gruber  Titcomb|  10 | 2-2

The following is the record of the victories scored by the eight
League Clubs on home grounds in the championship arena during
1888:

            |   |   | P |   |   |   | I |   ||
            |   |   | h |   |   |   | n |   ||
            |   |   | i |   |   |   | d | W ||
            |   |   | l |   |   | P | i | a || G
            | N |   | a |   |   | i | a | s || a
            | e | C | d |   | D | t | n | h || m
            | w | h | e | B | e | t | a | i || e
            |   | i | l | o | t | s | p | n || s
            | Y | c | p | s | r | b | o | g ||
            | o | a | h | t | o | u | l | t || W
            | r | g | i | o | i | r | i | o || o
            | k | o | a | n | t | g | s | n || n
            | . | . | . | . | . | . | . | . ||..
------------+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++---
New York    | --|  4|  8|  5|  6|  6|  7|  8|| 44
Chicago     |  6| --|  4|  7|  5|  4|  9|  8|| 43
Philadelphia|  4|  4| --|  3|  5|  7|  9|  5|| 37
Boston      |  3|  4|  1| --|  6|  6|  6|  8|| 34
Detroit     |  4|  5|  8|  5| --|  7|  6|  6|| 41
Pittsburg   |  3|  6|  2|  6|  7| --|  8|  6|| 38
Indianapolis|  3|  5|  3|  5|  4|  4| --|  7|| 31
Washington  |  1|  4|  4|  3|  4|  5|  5| --|| 26
------------+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++---
Games Lost  | 24| 32| 30| 34| 37| 39| 50| 48||294


The record of victories on opponent's grounds is as follows:

            |   |   | P |   |   |   | I |   ||
            |   |   | h |   |   |   | n |   ||
            |   |   | i |   |   |   | d | W ||
            |   |   | l |   |   | P | i | a || G
            | N |   | a |   |   | i | a | s || a
            | e | C | d |   | D | t | n | h || m
            | w | h | e | B | e | t | a | i || e
            |   | i | l | o | t | s | p | n || s
            | Y | c | p | s | r | b | o | g ||
            | o | a | h | t | o | u | l | t || W
            | r | g | i | o | i | r | i | o || o
            | k | o | a | n | t | g | s | n || n
            | . | . | . | . | . | . | . | . ||..
------------+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++---
New York    | --|  4|  6|  7|  5|  4|  7|  7|| 40
Chicago     |  5| --|  4|  5|  5|  5|  5|  5|| 34
Philadelphia|  1|  6| --|  6|  2|  8|  4|  5|| 32
Boston      |  5|  3|  8| --|  4|  4|  5|  7|| 36
Detroit     |  3|  5|  3|  3| --|  3|  5|  5|| 27
Pittsburg   |  4|  5|  4|  2|  3| --|  6|  4|| 28
Indianapolis|  2|  1|  1|  4|  4|  2| --|  5|| 19
Washington  |  3|  2|  5|  2|  3|  4|  3| --|| 22
------------+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++---
Games Lost  | 23| 26| 31| 29| 26| 30| 35| 38||238


[Illustration: JOHN B. DAY, NEW YORK]
[Illustration: F. K. STEARNS DETROIT]
[Illustration: A. G SPALDING, CHICAGO.]
[Illustration: F. DE H ROBINSON, CLEVELAND]
LEAGUE CLUB PRESIDENTS.


[Illustration: W. A. NIMICK, PITTSBURG.]
[Illustration: J. T. BRUSH, INDIANAPOLIS.]
[Illustration: WALTER F. HEWETT, WASHINGTON.]
[Illustration: A. J. REACH, PHILADELPHIA.]
LEAGUE CLUB PRESIDENTS.

THE LESSONS OF THE LEAGUE CAMPAIGN OF 1888.

Among the noteworthy results of the League championship campaign of 1888
meriting special comment as affording lessons to be profited by in the
future, may be named, first, the success of the Eastern Club of New York,
in winning the pennant from the West; secondly, that of the Chicago Club
in attaining second place in the race in the face of drawbacks which,
under any other management, would have sufficed to have left the Club
among the tail-enders; and thirdly, the remarkable failure of the Boston
Club to attain even one of the three leading positions in the race, after
that club had incurred such a heavy expense in strengthening its team with
"star" players. The success of the New York Club in winning the
championship, introducing, as it did, a new possessor of the League
pennant and its accompanying honors, may justly be regarded as an
advantage to the general interests of the National League, inasmuch as it
is anything but desirable that one club should, season after season, carry
off the honors, as the old Boston Club did in the early history of the
professional championship contest; or as the Chicago Club has done in
monopolizing the championship of the National League during the past
thirteen years of its history. Such monopoly of the honors of each
season's campaign, by one or two of the leading clubs of each year,
materially lessens the public interest taken in the annual competition.
Besides which, it interferes, to a costly extent, with the financial
prosperity of a majority of the competing clubs. Now that a club, new to
championship honors, has replaced one of the monopolists, the other
previously unsuccessful clubs will begin to entertain hopes of being able
to "get in at the death," as the fox hunters say, in future pennant races,
if not this ensuing year, and thereby a new interest will be imparted to
coming campaigns.

A feature of the past campaign of 1888 worthy of remark, too, is the fact
of the surprisingly good work on the field accomplished by the so-called
"weakened Chicago team." While this work was unquestionably due in a great
measure to able management, the assisting element of "temperance in the
ranks" had much to do with it. It is equally unquestionable that the very
reverse had a great deal to do with the lamentable failure of the Boston
team to follow up the success with which that club's team opened the
campaign. The contrast, these two clubs presented in this special respect
calls for the most earnest consideration of the vital question of
insisting upon temperate habits in all the club teams during the period of
the championship season each year. The evil of drunkenness among the
professional teams is one which has grown upon the fraternity until it has
become too costly an abuse to be longer tolerated. Drunken professionals
should be driven from service just as the crooks of a dozen years ago
were, never to be allowed to return. Drunken players are not only a costly
drawback to success individually, but they permeate the whole baseball
fraternity with a demoralizing influence. The fact is, professional
baseball playing has arrived at that point of excellence, and reached so
advanced a position in regard to its financial possibilities, that it will
no longer pay, in any solitary respect, to allow players of drinking
habits in first-class teams. The demands of the game, as it is now played,
are such as to require a player to have all his wits about him to play
ball up to the standard it has now reached. He needs the steadiest of
nerves, the clearest eyesight, the most unclouded judgment, and the
healthiest physique to play the game as it is required to be done by the
exacting public patrons of the present day. Another thing, the capitalists
who have ventured thousands of dollars in baseball stock companies, can no
longer allow their money to be risked in teams which are weakened by the
presence of men of drinking habits. Mr. Spalding's plucky and most
successful experiment has conclusively shown that a baseball team run on
temperance principles can successfully compete with teams stronger in
other respects, but which are weakened by the toleration of drinking
habits in their ranks. Here is a lesson taught by the campaign of 1888
which points a moral, if it does not adorn a tale.

Another special lesson of the past campaign which was practically
illustrated by the Boston Club was, that star players do not make a
winning team. The fact is, the pennant cannot be won by any costly outlay
in securing the services of this, that, or the other "greatest player in
the country." It is well managed and harmonious teams, not picked nines
led by special stars, which win in the long run. Now and then--as there
are exceptions in all cases--a picked nine will attain a certain degree of
success. But for steady struggles for permanent success in the
professional championship arena, team work of the very best, and admirably
managed teams will alone achieve steady victory. The old Boston teams
under Harry Wright, and the Chicago teams under Anson, are a standing
proof of this fact. Let the National League magnates ponder these truths
earnestly.

THE LEAGUE PITCHING OF 1888.

While there is no more reliable a record, by which to estimate a
pitcher's skill in the box, than the figures showing the runs clean earned
off the pitching; in the absence of such figures the best criterion is
that of the record of victories and defeats pitched in, the percentage of
victories to games played being the deciding point in awarding the palm of
superior work in the box. In 1888 the pitchers were handicapped by the
absurd rule which charged runs scored on bases on balls as _earned_ runs,
successive bases on balls giving an earned run to the batting side, even
in the absence of a single base hit. To estimate a pitcher's skill on such
a basis is nonsense. As the scoring rules do not admit of the record of
data showing runs clean earned off the pitching, and not off the fielding
and pitching combined, we are obliged to make up a record of the
percentage of victories as the only reliable figures at command on which
to judge the pitching of the season. By and by the Committee of Conference
will get out of the old rut in this respect, and then correct data will be
available; until then we must do the best we can under the circumstances,
and consequently the names of the pitchers of the League Clubs who took
part in not less than ten games are appended, and these are placed in the
order of the best percentage of victories.

  |           |            |   |   |   | P
  |           |            |   |   |   | e
  |           |            |   |   |   | r
  |           |            |   |   |   | c
  |           |            |   |   | P | e
  |           |            |   |   | l | n
  |           |            |   | L | a | t
  |           |            | W | o | y | a
  |           |            | o | s | e | g
  |           |            | n | t | d | e
  |PITCHERS.  |CLUB.       | . | . | . | .
--+-----------+------------+---+---+---+-----
 1|Keefe      |New York    | 35| 12| 47| .745
 2|Conway     |Detroit     | 31| 14| 15| .689
 3|Buffinton  |Philadelphia| 29| 15| 44| .659
 4|Sanders    |Philadelphia| 19| 10| 29| .655
 5|Krock      |Chicago     | 25| 14| 39| .641
 6|Titcomb    |New York    | 14|  8| 22| .636
 7|Clarkson   |Boston      | 33| 20| 53| .623
 8|Tener      |Chicago     |  7|  5| 12| .583
 9|Welch      |New York    | 26| 19| 45| .577
10|Sowders    |Boston      | 19| 15| 34| .559
11|Morris     |Pittsburg   | 29| 24| 53| .547
12|Van Haltren|Chicago     | 13| 11| 24| .542
13|Staley     |Pittsburg   | 12| 12| 24| .500
14|Burdick    |Indianapolis| 10| 10| 20| .500
15|Galvin     |Pittsburg   | 23| 25| 48| .479
16|Whitney    |Washington  | 19| 21| 40| .475
17|Baldwin    |Chicago     | 13| 15| 28| .464
18|Gruber     |Detroit     | 11| 13| 24| .458
19|Crane      |New York    |  5|  6| 11| .455
20|Casey      |Philadelphia| 14| 19| 33| .424
21|Beatin     |Detroit     |  5|  7| 12| .417
22|Getzein    |Detroit     | 18| 26| 44| .409
23|Boyle      |Indianapolis| 15| 22| 37| .405
24|Madden     |Boston      |  7| 12| 19| .368
25|Widner     |Washington  |  4|  7| 11| .364
26|O'Day      |Washington  | 16| 31| 47| .340
27|Shreve     |Indianapolis| 11| 24| 35| .314
28|Radbourne  |Boston      |  7| 16| 23| .304
29|Gleason    |Philadelphia|  7| 17| 24| .292

Some remarkable pitching was done during the season of 1888, alike in the
American arena, as in the League. The strategic work was up to a very high
mark in the League, and in this, Keefe, Conway, Buffinton, Clarkson,
Welch, Galvin, and Morris bore off the palm, while in speed alone, Crane
of New York excelled.

The detailed record of victories and defeats pitched in during the
championship campaign of 1888 by those who pitched in at least five
victories, is as follows. The names are given in the order of most
victories and fewest defeats:

VICTORIES.

           |   |   | P |   |   |   | I |   ||
           |   |   | h |   |   |   | n |   ||
           |   |   | i |   |   |   | d | W ||
           |   |   | l |   |   | P | i | a || V
           | N |   | a |   |   | I | a | s || i
           | e | C | d |   | D | t | n | h || c
           | w | h | e | B | e | t | a | i || t
           |   | i | l | o | t | s | p | n || o
           | Y | c | p | s | r | b | o | g || r
           | o | a | h | t | o | u | l | t || i
           | r | g | i | o | i | r | i | o || e
           | k | o | a | n | t | g | s | n || s
           | . | . | . | . | . | . | . | . || .
-----------+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++---
Keefe      | --|  3|  5|  5|  5|  3|  8|  6|| 35
Clarkson   |  5| --|  5| --|  6|  1|  5|  6|| 33
Conway     |  5|  5|  5|  2| --|  5|  6|  3|| 31
Buffinton  |  3|  4| --|  5|  2|  7|  5|  3|| 29
Morris     |  6|  3|  4|  6|  3| --|  4|  3|| 29
Welch      | --|  3|  5|  6|  1|  4|  3|  4|| 26
Krock      |  5| --|  2|  3|  4|  3|  4|  4|| 25
Sanders    |  0|  3| --|  3|  1|  3|  5|  4|| 19
Sowders    |  3|  1|  2| --|  2|  4|  2|  5|| 19
Whitney    |  3|  3|  4|  3|  1|  3|  2| --|| 19
Getzein    |  0|  4|  4|  2| --|  2|  3|  3|| 18
O'Day      |  1|  2|  3|  2|  3|  3|  2| --|| 16
Boyle      |  2|  1|  2|  4|  2|  1| --|  3|| 15
Titcomb    | --|  1|  2|  1|  3|  2|  1|  4|| 14
Casey      |  1|  2| --|  2|  4|  2|  2|  1|| 14
Van Haltren|  0| --|  2|  1|  2|  2|  2|  4|| 13
Baldwin    |  3| --|  1|  3|  2|  2|  2|  0|| 13
Staley     |  0|  2|  0|  1|  1| --|  6|  3|| 12
Gruber     |  2|  1|  1|  3| --|  1|  2|  1|| 11
Shreve     |  2|  1|  0|  3|  3|  1| --|  1|| 11
Burdick    |  1|  3|  0|  1|  1|  3| --|  1|| 10
Tener      |  2| --|  0|  2|  1|  0|  1|  1||  7
Madden     |  0|  0|  2| --|  0|  3|  1|  1||  7
Radbourne  |  0|  1|  0| --|  2|  1|  0|  3||  7
Gleason    |  1|  0| --|  0|  0|  3|  1|  2||  7
Crane      | --|  1|  2|  0|  1|  0|  0|  1||  5
Beatin     |  0|  0|  0|  1| --|  1|  0|  3||  5

DEFEATS
           |   |   | P |   |   |   | I |   ||
           |   |   | h |   |   |   | n |   ||
           |   |   | i |   |   |   | d | W ||
           |   |   | l |   |   | P | i | a ||
           | N |   | a |   |   | I | a | s ||
           | e | C | d |   | D | t | n | h ||
           | w | h | e | B | e | t | a | i || D
           |   | i | l | o | t | s | p | n || e
           | Y | c | p | s | r | b | o | g || f
           | o | a | h | t | o | u | l | t || e
           | r | g | i | o | i | r | i | o || a
           | k | o | a | n | t | g | s | n || s
           | . | . | . | . | . | . | . | . || .
-----------+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++---
Tener      |  1| --|  2|  0|  0|  0|  1|  1||  5
Crane      | --|  0|  0|  0|  1|  1|  2|  2||  6
Beatin     |  1|  2|  1|  2| --|  0|  1|  0||  7
Titcomb    | --|  1|  0|  1|  3|  2|  0|  1||  8
Sanders    |  3|  2| --|  2|  1|  1|  0|  1|| 10
Burdick    |  1|  1|  3|  1|  1|  0| --|  3|| 10
Van Haltren|  2| --|  1|  2|  3|  2|  1|  0|| 11
Keefe      | --|  4|  1|  4|  0|  1|  2|  0|| 12
Staley     |  2|  1|  2|  2|  3| --|  1|  1|| 12
Madden     |  3|  2|  2| --|  2|  2|  1|  0|| 12
Gruber     |  3|  1|  2|  2| --|  0|  2|  3|| 13
Conway     |  2|  2|  1|  2| --|  3|  1|  3|| 14
Krock      |  2| --|  2|  3|  2|  3|  1|  1|| 14
Buffinton  |  4|  2| --|  3|  2|  2|  1|  1|| 15
Sowders    |  3|  2|  4| --|  2|  2|  2|  0|| 15
Baldwin    |  1| --|  1|  1|  4|  4|  2|  2|| 15
Radbourne  |  2|  5|  0| --|  2|  2|  2|  3|| 16
Gleason    |  2|  3| --|  3|  3|  1|  0|  5|| 17
Welch      | --|  6|  4|  3|  2|  2|  1|  1|| 19
Casey      |  5|  1| --|  1|  5|  2|  3|  2|| 19
Clarkson   |  4|  3|  4| --|  2|  2|  3|  2|| 20
Whitney    |  4|  1|  2|  5|  2|  4|  3| --|| 21
Boyle      |  5|  5|  3|  3|  1|  5| --|  0|| 22
Morris     |  3|  4|  4|  2|  3| --|  2|  6|| 24
Shreve     |  4|  4|  4|  2|  5|  3| --|  2|| 24
Galvin     |  4|  3|  7|  5|  3| --|  1|  2|| 25
Getzein    |  5|  3|  3|  4| --|  7|  3|  1|| 26
O'Day      |  4|  5|  4|  5|  3|  3|  7| --|| 31

These pitching records not only present a tolerably fair criterion of a
pitcher's skill in the box--though of course not as reliable as the data
of clean earned runs off his pitching or of clean hits made from it--but
they afford an interesting and instructive record from which to judge of
the success of a pitcher in defeating one particular team more frequently
than he does another, and vice versa. In fact, experience has shown that
no matter how effective a pitcher may be in a season's work, it will be
found that there is always one team which bothers him more than any other
he has to face, just as shown in the above quoted instances.

In regard to judging of a pitcher's ability as a fielder in his position
by the fielding averages of pitchers the basis was made equally as
unreliable as the estimate of earned runs was, owing to the fact that the
data of the fielding averages of a pitcher were made up from the figures
of "assistance on strikes" as well as from legitimate fielding
assistances. For this reason the pitcher, who was really a poor fielder in
his position in fielding balls from the bat, but who happened to be
fortunate in striking batsmen out by his pitching--thereby getting a big
record of pitching assistances--became the leader in the pitcher's
fielding averages; while the pitcher who really excelled as a fielder when
in the box, but who was not as fortunate in striking out his batting
opponents, and therefore could not furnish as good a record of assistances
on strikes, was set down in the fielding averages as a tail-ender.

The individual club record of the pitching of 1888 presents some
interesting figures. For instance, we find that while Chicago used no less
than eleven pitchers during the championship season Philadelphia was
content with but four. No less than twenty new pitchers entered the League
season in 1888, and of these, Sanders of Philadelphia; Tener and Krock of
Chicago; Sowders of Boston; Staley of Pittsburgh; Burdick of Indianapolis,
and Widner of Washington, proved to be acquisitions.

Below will be found the individual club pitching records for 1888,
showing the victories and defeats each club pitcher participated in as an
occupant of the box. The names given in italics are those of pitchers new
to the League arena:

EASTERN CLUBS.

NEW YORK.
        |     |  P  |     |     |     |  I  |     ||
        |     |  h  |     |     |     |  n  |     ||
        |     |  i  |     |     |     |  d  |  W  ||
        |     |  l  |     |     |  P  |  i  |  a  ||
        |     |  a  |     |     |  i  |  a  |  s  ||
        |  C  |  d  |     |  D  |  t  |  n  |  h  ||
        |  h  |  e  |  B  |  e  |  t  |  a  |  i  ||
        |  I  |  l  |  o  |  t  |  s  |  p  |  n  ||
        |  c  |  p  |  s  |  r  |  b  |  o  |  g  ||
        |  a  |  h  |  t  |  o  |  u  |  l  |  t  ||
        |  g  |  i  |  o  |  i  |  r  |  i  |  o  ||
        |  o  |  a  |  n  |  t  |  g  |  s  |  n  ||
        |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  || Totals.
--------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
        |W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.||W.|L.|P.
--------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
Keefe   | 3| 4| 5| 2| 5| 4| 5| 0| 3| 1| 8| 2| 6| 0||35|12| 47
Welch   | 3| 6| 5| 4| 6| 3| 1| 2| 4| 2| 3| 1| 4| 1||25|19| 45
Titcomb | 1| 1| 2| 0| 1| 1| 3| 3| 2| 2| 1| 0| 4| 1||14| 8| 22
_Crane_ | 1| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 1| 1| 0| 1| 0| 2| 1| 2|| 5| 6| 11
George  | 0| 0| 2| 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 1| 1| 0| 0| 0|| 2| 1|  3
Weidman | 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 0|| 1| 1|  2
--------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
Totals  | 8|11|14| 5|12| 8|11| 7| 9| 7|14| 5|15| 4||83|47|130
        |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |[1]
[Footnote 1: One game with Pittsburg was won by forfeit.]

CHICAGO.
           |     |  P  |     |     |     |  I  |     ||
           |     |  h  |     |     |     |  n  |     ||
           |     |  i  |     |     |     |  d  |  W  ||
           |     |  l  |     |     |  P  |  i  |  a  ||
           |  N  |  a  |     |     |  i  |  a  |  s  ||
           |  e  |  d  |     |  D  |  t  |  n  |  h  ||
           |  w  |  e  |  B  |  e  |  t  |  a  |  i  ||
           |     |  l  |  o  |  t  |  s  |  p  |  n  ||
           |  Y  |  p  |  s  |  r  |  b  |  o  |  g  ||
           |  o  |  h  |  t  |  o  |  u  |  l  |  t  ||
           |  r  |  i  |  o  |  i  |  r  |  i  |  o  ||
           |  k  |  a  |  n  |  t  |  g  |  s  |  n  ||
           |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  || Totals.
-----------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
           |W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.||W.|L.|P.
-----------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
_Krock_    | 5| 2| 2| 2| 3| 3| 4| 2| 3| 3| 4| 1| 4| 1||25|14|39
Van Haltren| 0| 2| 2| 1| 1| 2| 2| 3| 2| 2| 2| 1| 4| 0||13|11|24
Baldwin    | 3| 1| 1| 1| 3| 1| 2| 4| 2| 4| 2| 2| 0| 2||13|15|28
_Tener_    | 2| 1| 0| 2| 2| 0| 1| 0| 0| 0| 1| 1| 1| 1|| 7| 5|12
_Dwyer_    | 0| 1| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 2| 0|| 4| 1| 5
_Borchers_ | 0| 0| 1| 1| 1| 0| 0| 1| 1| 2| 1| 0| 0| 1|| 4| 5| 9
Ryan       | 1| 0| 1| 0| 0| 1| 1| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0|| 3| 1| 4
_Gumpert_  | 0| 1| 0| 1| 1| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 1| 2| 0|| 3| 3| 6
_Clark_    | 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 2| 0| 0| 0|| 2|| 0| 2
_Bryman_   | 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 0| 0| 1|| 2| 1| 3
_Mains_    | 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 0|| 1| 1| 2
-----------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
Totals     |11| 8| 8| 9|12| 7|10|10| 9|11|14| 6|13| 6||77|57|134
           |  |  |  |[1]

[Footnote 1: One defeat with the Philadelphia Club was by forfeit.]

DETROIT.
       |     |     |  P  |     |     |  I  |     ||
       |     |     |  h  |     |     |  n  |     ||
       |     |     |  i  |     |     |  d  |  W  ||
       |     |     |  l  |     |  P  |  i  |  a  ||
       |  N  |     |  a  |     |  i  |  a  |  s  ||
       |  e  |  C  |  d  |     |  t  |  n  |  h  ||
       |  w  |  h  |  e  |  B  |  t  |  a  |  i  ||
       |     |  i  |  l  |  o  |  s  |  p  |  n  ||
       |  Y  |  c  |  p  |  s  |  b  |  o  |  g  ||
       |  o  |  a  |  h  |  t  |  u  |  l  |  t  ||
       |  r  |  g  |  i  |  o  |  r  |  i  |  o  ||
       |  k  |  o  |  a  |  n  |  g  |  s  |  n  ||
       |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  || Totals.
-------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
       |W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.||W.|L.|P.
-------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
Conway | 5| 2| 5| 2| 5| 1| 2| 2| 5| 3| 6| 1| 3| 3||31|14| 45
Getzein| 0| 5| 4| 3| 4| 3| 2| 4| 2| 7| 3| 3| 3| 1||18|26| 44
Gruber | 2| 3| 1| 1| 1| 2| 3| 2| 1| 0| 2| 3| 1| 3|| 1|13| 24
Beatin | 0| 1| 0| 2| 0| 1| 1| 2| 1| 0| 0| 1| 3| 0|| 5| 7| 12
Baldwin| 0| 0| 0| 2| 1| 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 1| 1| 0|| 3| 3|  6
-------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
Totals | 7|11|10|10|11| 7| 8|10|10|10|11| 8|11| 7||68|63|131



PHILADELPHIA.
         |     |     |     |     |     |  I  |     ||
         |     |     |     |     |     |  n  |     ||
         |     |     |     |     |     |  d  |  W  ||
         |     |     |     |     |  P  |  i  |  a  ||
         |  N  |     |     |     |  i  |  a  |  s  ||
         |  e  |  C  |     |  D  |  t  |  n  |  h  ||
         |  w  |  h  |  B  |  e  |  t  |  a  |  i  ||
         |     |  i  |  o  |  t  |  s  |  p  |  n  ||
         |  Y  |  c  |  s  |  r  |  b  |  o  |  g  ||
         |  o  |  a  |  t  |  o  |  u  |  l  |  t  ||
         |  r  |  g  |  o  |  i  |  r  |  i  |  o  ||
         |  k  |  o  |  n  |  t  |  g  |  s  |  n  ||
         |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  || Totals.
---------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
         |W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|P.
---------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
Buffinton| 3| 4| 4| 2| 5| 3| 2| 2| 7| 2| 5| 1| 3| 1||29|15| 44
_Sanders_| 0| 3| 3| 2| 3| 2| 1| 1| 3| 1| 5| 0| 4| 1||19|10| 29
Casey    | 1| 5| 2| 1| 2| 1| 4| 5| 2| 2| 2| 3| 1| 2||14|19| 33
_Gleason_| 1| 2| 0| 3| 0| 3| 0| 3| 3| 1| 1| 0| 2| 5|| 7|17| 24
---------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
Totals   | 4|14| 9| 8|10| 9| 7|11|15| 6|13| 4|10| 9||69|71|130
         |  |  |[1]  |  |  |  |  |[2]

[Footnote 1: One game with Chicago was won by forfeit.]
[Footnote 2: One game with Pittsburg thrown out.]

BOSTON.
         |     |     |  P  |     |     |  I  |     ||
         |     |     |  h  |     |     |  n  |     ||
         |     |     |  i  |     |     |  d  |  W  ||
         |     |     |  l  |     |  P  |  i  |  a  ||
         |  N  |     |  a  |     |  i  |  a  |  s  ||
         |  e  |  C  |  d  |  D  |  t  |  n  |  h  ||
         |  w  |  h  |  e  |  e  |  t  |  a  |  i  ||
         |     |  i  |  l  |  t  |  s  |  p  |  n  ||
         |  Y  |  c  |  p  |  r  |  b  |  o  |  g  ||
         |  o  |  a  |  h  |  o  |  u  |  l  |  t  ||
         |  r  |  g  |  i  |  i  |  r  |  i  |  o  ||
         |  k  |  o  |  a  |  t  |  g  |  s  |  n  ||
         |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  || Totals.
---------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
         |W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.||W.|L.|P.
---------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
Clarkson | 5| 4| 5| 3| 5| 4| 6| 2| 1| 2| 5| 3| 6| 2||33|20| 53
_Sowders_| 3| 3| 1| 2| 2| 4| 2| 2| 4| 2| 2| 2| 5| 0||19|15| 34
Madden   | 0| 3| 0| 2| 2| 2| 0| 2| 3| 2| 1| 1| 1| 0|| 7|12| 19
Radbourne| 0| 2| 1| 5| 0| 0| 2| 2| 1| 2| 0| 2| 3| 3|| 7|16| 23
Conway   | 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 3| 1| 0| 0|| 4| 1|  5
---------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
Totals   | 8|12| 7|10| 9|10|10| 8|10| 8|11| 9|15| 5||70|64|134

INDIANAPOLIS.
         |     |     |  P  |     |     |     |     ||
         |     |     |  h  |     |     |     |     ||
         |     |     |  i  |     |     |     |  W  ||
         |     |     |  l  |     |     |  P  |  a  ||
         |  N  |     |  a  |     |     |  i  |  s  ||
         |  e  |  C  |  d  |     |  D  |  t  |  h  ||
         |  w  |  h  |  e  |  B  |  e  |  t  |  i  ||
         |     |  i  |  l  |  o  |  t  |  s  |  n  ||
         |  Y  |  c  |  p  |  s  |  r  |  b  |  g  ||
         |  o  |  a  |  h  |  t  |  o  |  u  |  t  ||
         |  r  |  g  |  i  |  o  |  i  |  r  |  o  ||
         |  k  |  o  |  a  |  n  |  t  |  g  |  n  ||
         |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  || Totals.
---------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
         |W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.||W.|L.|P.
---------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
Boyle    | 2| 5| 1| 5| 2| 3| 4| 3| 2| 1| 1| 5| 3| 0||15|22| 37
Healy    | 0| 3| 1| 4| 2| 2| 1| 3| 2| 3| 1| 6| 5| 3||12|24| 36
Shreve   | 2| 4| 1| 4| 0| 4| 3| 2| 3| 5| 1| 3| 1| 2||11|24| 35
_Burdick_| 1| 1| 3| 1| 0| 3| 1| 1| 1| 1| 3| 0| 1| 3||10|10| 20
Moffat   | 0| 1| 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 2| 0| 1| 0| 0| 2| 0|| 2| 5|  7
---------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
Totals   | 5|14| 6|14| 4|13| 9|11| 8|11| 6|14|12| 8||50|85|135

WASHINGTON.
          |     |     |  P  |     |     |     |  I  ||
          |     |     |  h  |     |     |     |  n  ||
          |     |     |  i  |     |     |     |  d  ||
          |     |     |  l  |     |     |  P  |  i  ||
          |  N  |     |  a  |     |     |  i  |  a  ||
          |  e  |  C  |  d  |     |  D  |  t  |  n  ||
          |  w  |  h  |  e  |  B  |  e  |  t  |  a  ||
          |     |  i  |  l  |  o  |  t  |  s  |  p  ||
          |  Y  |  c  |  p  |  s  |  r  |  b  |  o  ||
          |  o  |  a  |  h  |  t  |  o  |  u  |  l  ||
          |  r  |  g  |  i  |  o  |  i  |  r  |  i  ||
          |  k  |  o  |  a  |  n  |  t  |  g  |  s  ||
          |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  || Totals.
----------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
          |W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.||W.|L.|P.
----------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
Whitney   | 3| 4| 3| 1| 4| 2| 3| 5| 1| 2| 3| 4| 2| 3||18|21| 40
O'Day     | 1| 4| 2| 5| 3| 4| 2| 5| 3| 3| 3| 3| 2| 7||16|31| 47
Keefe     | 0| 2| 0| 2| 0| 1| 0| 1| 2| 1| 2| 0| 2| 0|| 6| 7| 13
_Widner_  | 0| 1| 0| 2| 1| 2| 0| 2| 1| 0| 1| 0| 1| 0|| 4| 7| 11
Daily     | 0| 0| 1| 1| 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 2| 0| 0| 1| 0|| 2| 4|  6
Gilmore   | 0| 3| 0| 0| 1| 1| 0| 1| 0| 2| 0| 2| 0| 1|| 1|10| 11
_Greening_| 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0|| 0| 1|  1
_Haddock_ | 0| 1| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0|| 0| 2|  2
Shaw      | 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 0| 1|| 0| 3|  3
----------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+---
Totals    | 4|15| 6|13| 9|10| 5|15| 7|11| 9|10| 8|12||48|86|134


PITTSBURG.
           |     |     |  P  |     |     |  I  |     ||
           |     |     |  h  |     |     |  n  |     ||
           |     |     |  i  |     |     |  d  |  W  ||
           |     |     |  l  |     |     |  i  |  a  ||
           |  N  |     |  a  |     |     |  a  |  s  ||
           |  e  |  C  |  d  |     |  D  |  n  |  h  ||
           |  w  |  h  |  e  |  B  |  e  |  a  |  i  ||
           |     |  i  |  l  |  o  |  t  |  p  |  n  ||
           |  Y  |  c  |  p  |  s  |  r  |  o  |  g  ||
           |  o  |  a  |  h  |  t  |  o  |  l  |  t  ||
           |  r  |  g  |  i  |  o  |  i  |  i  |  o  ||
           |  k  |  o  |  a  |  n  |  t  |  s  |  n  ||
           |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  || Totals.
-----------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+-----++-+--+---
           |W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.||W.|L.|P.
-----------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+-----++-+--+---
Morris     | 6| 3| 3| 4| 4| 4| 6| 2| 3| 3| 4| 2| 3| 6||29|24| 53
Galvin     | 1| 4| 5| 3| 2| 7| 1| 5| 6| 3| 5| 1| 3| 2||23|25| 48
_Staley_   | 0| 2| 2| 1| 0| 2| 1| 2| 1| 3| 5| 1| 3| 1||12|12| 24
_Knell_    | 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 1| 1| 0|| 1| 2|  3
_Henderson_| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 1| 0| 1| 0| 1| 0| 1| 0| 0|| 1| 4|  5
Maul       | 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0|| 0| 1|  1
-----------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+-----++-+--+---
Totals     | 7| 9|11| 9| 6|15| 8|10|10|10|14| 6|10| 9||66|68|134
           |[1]  |  |  |  |[1]

[Footnote 1: One game with New York was forfeited, and one defeat with
Philadelphia was thrown out.]

The retiring pitchers of the year were McCormick of Pittsburgh, Ferguson
of Philadelphia, who died early in the season; Weidman and Twitchell of
Detroit; Shaw of Washington; Mattimore of New York; Pyle and Sprague of
Chicago; Leitner, Morrison and Kirby of Indianapolis, and Stemmyer of
Boston

THE MONTHLY RECORDS.

The month of _April_ saw Boston taking the lead in the record of
victories for that month, that club not sustaining a single defeat in
April. Chicago stood second, with New York and Pittsburgh tied in the
number of victories and defeats credited and charged to each club, Detroit
standing fifth, while Indianapolis, Philadelphia and Washington brought up
the rear.

_In May_ Chicago led all the other teams in their victories that month;
Detroit being second, Philadelphia third, New York fourth, and Boston
fifth, Indianapolis being sixth, with Pittsburgh and Washington tied for
last place in the May record, Boston and Pittsburgh falling off badly this
month.

_In June_ Detroit won the most victories, it being their best month's
work of the season, Chicago being second, Philadelphia third, New York
fourth, Boston fifth, Washington sixth, with Indianapolis seventh and
Pittsburgh last, it being the latter club's poorest month's work of the
campaign.

_In July_ the new rule of management, inaugurated by Mr. Day, placed New
York in the front, and the result was that the "Giants" in July made the
best month's record of the season, over 18 victories to but five defeats;
Detroit stood second on the list in July victories, with Pittsburgh third,
the latter making a good rally in July; Indianapolis, too, played well
this month and stood fourth, Washington being fifth, and Chicago sixth,
the latter taking a bad tumble, Philadelphia and Boston being the two last
in July victories, Boston winning but five victories out of twenty-two
games, that club's worst monthly record.

_In August_ Boston rallied in brilliant style, scoring 16 victories out
of 22 games, quite a contrast to their poor work in July; New York was
second, and Pittsburgh third, the latter doing better, even, than in July;
Philadelphia stood fourth, Chicago fifth, Washington sixth, with
Indianapolis seventh and Detroit last, the latter only winning five
victories out of 21 games in August.

_In September_ Chicago rallied well and went to the front in the record
of the month's victories, Pittsburgh being second, New York third, Detroit
fourth--the latter rallying; Philadelphia sixth, with Indianapolis and
Washington bringing up the rear. By the close of the month New York had
virtually settled the question of the championship, and the only struggle
left was that for second place.

_In October_ Philadelphia made its usual "spurt" at the finish, and that
club won eight out of nine games in October, after giving Chicago a close
fight for second place, and came in a good third in the pennant race. New
York was second in the October victories, Boston third, Pittsburgh and
Washington tied for fourth, Chicago was sixth--that club gaining second
position in the pennant race; Indianapolis and Washington being the two
last. Here is the full record of the monthly victories and defeats of the
campaign:

            |April| May | June| July| Aug.|Sept.| Oct.||Totals.
------------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----++---------
            |W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.||W.|L.|P.
New York    | 5| 3|12| 9|13|11|18| 5|16| 8|13| 8| 7| 3||84|47|131
Chicago     | 6| 2|15| 7|14| 8|10|14|12|13|16| 9| 4| 5||77|58|135
Philadelphia| 2| 7|12| 7|13|10| 9|15|15| 9|10|12| 8| 1||69|61|130
Boston      | 9| 0|11|13|12|11| 5|17|16| 6|12|12| 5| 5||70|64|134
Detroit     | 3| 5|14| 8|16| 6|14|10| 5|16|13|11| 3| 7||68|63|131
Pittsburg   | 5| 3| 7|14| 5|15|13| 9|16| 9|15|12| 5| 6||66|68|134
Indianapolis| 2| 6| 8|14| 7|14|13|11| 6|21|10|13| 4| 6||50|85|135
Washington  | 1| 7| 7|14| 9|14|11|12|10|14| 5|19| 5| 6||48|86|134

[Illustration: A. C. Anson. ]

THE LEADING PLAYERS OF THE LEAGUE.

Looking over the League averages, and taking those players who have taken
part in a majority of the championship contests of the season, we find the
appended names among those occupying the leading positions at the bat and
in the field.

Of those who played in one hundred games and over in the League
championship arena, the following comprise the first ten batsmen:

  |BATSMEN. |CLUB.   |Games.|Per cent. of
  |         |        |      |Base Hits.
--+---------+--------+------+---------
 1|Anson    |Chicago |  134 | .343
 2|Ryan     |Chicago |  130 | .331
 3|Kelly    |Boston  |  105 | .318
 4|Brouthers|Detroit |  129 | .306
 5|Ewing    |New York|  103 | .306
 6|White    |Detroit |  125 | .298
 7|Johnston |Boston  |  135 | .295
 8|Tiernan  |New York|  113 | .293
 9|Connor   |New York|  134 | .291
10|Nash     |Boston  |  135 | .283

Of those who played in one hundred games and over in the League campaign,
the following are the first seven in fielding averages:

FIELDERS. |POSITION.     |CLUB.    |Games.|Fielding|Per cent.
          |              |         |      |Average.| of
          |              |         |      |        |Base Hits.
----------+--------------+---------+------+--------+----------
Anson     |First Baseman |Chicago  |  134 |   .985 | .343
Richardson|Second Baseman|New York |  135 |   .942 | .226
Nash      |Third Baseman |Boston.  |  104 |   .913 | .283
Glasscock |Short Stop    |Ind'polis|  109 |   .900 | .269
Hornung   |Left Fielder  |Boston   |  107 |   .947 | .239
Slattery  |Center Fielder|New York |  103 |   .917 | .245
Tiernan   |Right Fielder |New York |  113 |   .959 | .293

Of the pitchers who took part in 50 games and over, the following led in
fielding averages:

No pitcher or catcher played in 100 games.

PITCHERS.|CLUB.    |Games.|Fielding|Per cent.
         |         |      |Average.| of
         |         |      |        |Base Hits.
---------+---------+------+--------+----------
Keefe    |New York |   51 |   .785 | .127
Galvin   |Pittsburg|   50 |   .758 | .143
Morris   |Pittsburg|   54 |   .732 | .102
Clarkson |Boston   |   54 |   .678 | .195

Of the catchers who took part in 60 games and over, the following led in
fielding averages:

CATCHERS.|CLUB.       |Games.|Fielding|Per cent.
         |            |      |Average.| of
         |            |      |        |Base Hits.
---------+------------+------+--------+----------
Bennett  |Detroit     |   72 |   .941 | .263
Daly     |Chicago     |   62 |   .880 | .191
Clements |Philadelphia|   84 |   .874 | .247
Ewing    |New York    |   78 |   .861 | .306
Mack     |Washington  |   79 |   .843 | .186
Miller   |Pittsburg   |   68 |   .805 | .277
Kelly    |Boston      |   74 |   .796 | .318

THE BASE RUNNING RECORD.

Those of the League championship players who are credited with not less
than 50 stolen bases in the pennant race, are as follows:

BASERUNNERS.|CLUB.       |Games.|Stolen Bases.
------------+------------+------+-----------
Hoy         |Washington  |  136 | 82
Seery       |Indianapolis|  133 | 80
Sunday      |Pittsburg   |  119 | 71
Pfeffer     |Chicago     |  136 | 64
Ryan        |Chicago     |  130 | 60
Fogarty     |Philadelphia|  120 | 58
Kelly       |Boston      |  105 | 56
Ewing       |New York    |  103 | 53
Tiernan     |New York    |  113 | 52

The above are the leaders in seven of the eight League clubs. Hanlon led
in the Detroit team, but he only scored 38 stolen bases in 108 games. The
Detroit team was singularly weak in this respect.

Mr. R.M. Larner of Washington has made up an interesting table from the
figures of the League averages, which presents some very interesting
statistics of the base running in the League during the championship
season of 1888. Mr. Larner says:

"The official averages of League players contain the number of bases
stolen by each player during the season, but furnish no means of
comparison between the clubs in that most important department of the
game. A glance, however, shows that the three tail-end clubs possess the
three most successful base-runners in the League, in Hoy of the
Washingtons, Seery of Indianapolis, and Sunday of Pittsburgh, the latter
of whom would probably have finished first had an accident not prevented
him from playing during the last two weeks of the season."

The following table includes in its first column all those methods of
reaching first base, except the force-outs, which cannot be ascertained,
and would not materially affect the record, in this comparison.
Indianapolis and Washington still lead, Pittsburgh comes well to the
front, pushing the next three clubs down a peg each, and the Phillies and
Detroits keep their places at the foot:

CLUBS.      |Reached 1st Base.|Stolen Bases.|Percentages.
------------+-----------------+-------------+-----------
Indianapolis|           1,589 |         350 | .220
Washington  |           1,515 |         331 | .218
Pittsburg   |           1,474 |         282 | .191
New York    |           1,772 |         315 | .178
Boston      |           1,719 |         292 | .170
Chicago     |           1,720 |         285 | .166
Philadelphia|           1,569 |         246 | .157
Detroit     |           1,843 |         193 | .105

Mr. Larner says. "The simple total of bases stolen is misleading as to a
club's proficiency in base running, since the strong batting clubs having
more men who reach first base have more chances to steal, and hence excel
in totals, while in percentages they fall below clubs which are weaker in
batting. The true measure is the relation between the number of bases
stolen and the number of chances offered for the attempt, which is the
whole number of those who reach first base, whether on hits, balls,
errors, hits by pitcher, illegal delivery, or force-outs."

THE CLUB RECORD OF STOLEN BASES.

The record in stolen bases in championship games, showing the first man
of each club in base stealing for 1888 is appended.

WASHINGTON.             ||PITTSBURG.
 |        |      |Stolen|| |        |      |Stolen
 |PLAYERS.|Games.|Bases.|| |PLAYERS.|Games.|Bases.
-+--------+------+------++-+--------+------+-------
1|Hoy     |  136 |   82 ||1|Sunday  |  119 |  71
2|Wilmot  |  119 |   46 ||2|Smith   |  130 |  32
3|Donnelly|  117 |   44 ||3|Dunlap  |   81 |  24
4|Daily   |  110 |   44 ||4|Mider   |  103 |  27
5|Mack    |   85 |   31 ||5|Beckley |   71 |  20
6|Schock  |   90 |   23 ||6|Carroll |   96 |  18
7|Myers   |  132 |   20 ||7|Kuehne  |  137 |  17
8|Irwin   |   37 |   15 ||8|Coleman |  115 |  15
9|O'Brien |  133 |   10 ||9|Fields  |   44 |   9
-+--------+------+------++-+--------+------+-------
Total            |  315 ||Total            | 228

NEW YORK.                 || PHILADELPHIA.
 |          |      |Stolen|| |         |      |Stolen
 |PLAYERS.  |Games.|Bases.|| |PLAYERS. |Games.|Bases.
-+----------+------+------++-+-------=-+------+-------
1|Ewing     |  105 |   53 ||1|Fogart   |  120 |  58
2|Tiernan   |  113 |   52 ||2|Delahanty|   74 |  38
3|Ward      |  122 |   38 ||3|Andrews  |  123 |  35
4|Richardson|  135 |   35 ||4|Farrar   |  130 |  21
5|Connor    |  134 |   27 ||5|Wood     |  105 |  20
6|Slattery  |  103 |   26 ||6|Irwin    |  124 |  19
7|O'Rourke  |  107 |   25 ||7|Mulvey   |   99 |  18
8|Gore      |   64 |    9 ||8|Sanders  |   57 |  13
9|Whitney   |   90 |    8 ||9|Bastian  |   80 |  12
-+----------+------+------++-+---------+------+-------
Total              |  280 ||Total             | 234

Taking the total bases stolen by each club nine as the criterion,
Indianapolis takes the lead, with Washington second and New York third,
followed by Chicago, Boston, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia and Detroit in
regular order, the latter club being the weakest of the eight League teams
in base running. Here is the record in full:

INDIANAPOLIS.             || BOSTON.
 |          |      |Stolen|| |         |      |Stolen
 |PLAYERS.  |Games.|Bases.|| |PLAYERS. |Games.|Bases.
-+----------+------+------++-+---------+------+-------
1|Seery     |  133 |   80 ||1|Kelly    |  105 |  56
2|McGeachy  |  118 |   49 ||2|Brown    |  107 |  46
3|Glasscock |  112 |   48 ||3|Johnston |  135 |  35
4|Denny     |  126 |   32 ||4|Wise     |  104 |  33
5|Hines     |  132 |   31 ||5|Hornung  |  107 |  29
6|Myers     |   66 |   28 ||6|Morrill  |  134 |  21
7|Bossett   |  128 |   24 ||7|Nash     |  135 |  20
8|Daily     |   57 |   15 ||8|Quinn    |   38 |  12
9|Esterbrook|   64 |   11 ||9|Sutton   |   28 |  10
-+----------+------+------++-+---------+------+-------
Total              |  318 ||Total             | 263

CHICAGO.                   || DETROIT.
 |           |      |Stolen|| |          |      |Stolen
 |PLAYERS.   |Games.|Bases.|| |PLAYERS.  |Games.|Bases.
-+-----------+------+------++-+----------+------+-------
1|Pfeffer    |  136 |   64 ||1|Hanlon    |  108 |  38
2|Ryan       |  130 |   60 ||2|Brouthers |  129 |  34
3|Burns      |  134 |   34 ||3|Campau    |   70 |  27
4|Anson      |  134 |   28 ||4|Twitchell |  130 |  14
5|Williamson |  132 |   25 ||5|Richardson|   57 |  13
6|Van Haltren|   81 |   21 ||6|White     |  125 |  12
7|Duffy      |   71 |   13 ||7|Ganzell   |   93 |  12
8|Daly       |   65 |   10 ||8|Rowe      |  105 |  10
9|Sullivan   |   75 |    9 ||9|Getzein   |   45 |   6
-+-----------+------+------++-+----------+------+-------
Total               |  264 ||Total              | 166

The following table is for immediate reference. It shows the winning club
for each season from 1871 to 1888 inclusive; as also the manager of each
of the champion clubs of each year:

Year.|WINNING CLUB.|MANAGER. |Victories.|Defeats.|Games
     |             |         |          |        |Played.
-----+-------------+---------+----------+--------+-------
1871 |Athletic     |Hayhurst |       22 |      7 |  29
1872 |Boston       |H. Wright|       39 |      8 |  47
1873 |Boston       |H. Wright|       43 |     16 |  59
1874 |Boston       |H. Wright|       52 |     18 |  70
1875 |Boston       |H. Wright|       71 |      8 |  79
1876 |Chicago      |Spalding |       52 |     14 |  66
1877 |Boston       |H. Wright|       31 |     17 |  48
1878 |Boston       |H. Wright|       41 |     19 |  60
1879 |Providence   |G. Wright|       55 |     23 |  78
1880 |Chicago      |Anson    |       67 |     18 |  84
1881 |Chicago      |Anson    |       56 |    28 |  84
1882 |Chicago      |Anson    |       55 |     29 |  84
1883 |Boston       |H. Wright|       63 |     35 |  98
1884 |Providence   |Bancroft |       84 |     28 | 112
1885 |Chicago      |Anson    |       87 |     25 | 112
1886 |Chicago      |Anson    |       90 |     34 | 124
1887 |Detroit      |Watkins  |       79 |     45 | 124
1888 |NewYork      |Mutrie   |       84 |     47 | 131

It will be seen that in the old Professional Association the Boston  club
won the pennant four times, and the Athletics once, while in the League
the Chicago Club won it six times, the Boston  Club three times, the
Providence Club twice, and the Detroit and New York once each. The best
percentage of victories was made by the Boston Club in 1875, that being
the best on record in professional club history.


THE CHAMPION LEAGUE TEAM OF 1888.

Though the New York Club's team for 1888 included over twenty different
players, only seven of them took part in one hundred championship matches
and over, and these were Richardson, 135; Connor, 134; Ward, 122; Tiernan,
113; O'Rourke, 107; Ewing, 103, and Slattery, 103. Whitney took part in
90; Gore in 64; Keefe in 51; Welch in 47; Foster in 37; Murphy in 28;
Hatfield in 27; Titcomb in 23; Brown in 17, and Crane in but 11. All the
others played in less than ten games. The first nine were Keefe p, Ewing
c, Connor 1b, Richardson 2b, Whitney 3b, Ward ss, O'Rourke lf, Slattery
cf, and Tiernan, rf, these playing the nine positions respectively. The
appended table presents an interesting epitome of the work done on the
field by the New
York team in the championship contests of the past season:


NEW YORK. vs.
                    |   | P |   |   |   | I |   ||
                    |   | h |   |   |   | n |   ||
                    |   | i |   |   |   | d | W ||
                    |   | l |   |   | P | i | a ||
                    |   | a |   |   | i | a | s ||
                    | C | d |   | D | t | n | h ||
                    | h | e | B | e | t | a | i || T
                    | i | l | o | t | s | p | n || o
                    | c | p | s | r | b | o | g || t
                    | a | h | t | o | u | l | t || a
                    | g | i | o | i | r | i | o || l
                    | o | a | n | t | g | s | n || s
                    | . | . | . | . | . | . | . || .
--------------------+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++---
Victories           | 8 |14 |12 |11 |10 |14 |15 || 84
Defeats             |11 | 5 | 8 | 7 | 7 | 5 | 4 || 47
Drawn Games         | 1 | 1 | 0 | 2 | 2 | 0 | 1 ||  7
Series Won          | 0 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 0 | 1 | 1 ||  5
Series Lost         | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 ||  1
Series Unfinished   | 1 | 1 | 0 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 ||  6
Victories by Forfeit| 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 0 ||  1
"Chicago" Victories | 2 | 1 | 1 | 2 | 4 | 3 | 6 || 19
"Chicago" Defeats   | 1 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 0 ||  3
Single Figure       | 5 |12 |10 |11 | 8 |11 |14 || 71
 Victories          |   |   |   |   |   |   |   ||
Single Figure       |11 | 4 | 8 | 5 | 7 | 5 | 4 || 44
 Defeats            |   |   |   |   |   |   |   ||
Double Figure       | 3 | 2 | 2 | 0 | 1 | 3 | 2 || 13
 Victories          |   |   |   |   |   |   |   ||
Double Figure       | 0 | 1 | 0 | 2 | 0 | 0 | 1 ||  4
 Defeats            |   |   |   |   |   |   |   ||
Extra Inning Games  | 1 | 2 | 3 | 1 | 1 | 0 | 1 ||  9
Victories at Home   | 4 | 8 | 5 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 || 43
Defeats at Home     | 5 | 1 | 5 | 3 | 4 | 2 | 3 || 23
Victories Abroad    | 4 | 6 | 7 | 5 | 4 | 7 | 7 || 40
Defeats Abroad      | 6 | 4 | 3 | 4 | 3 | 3 | 1 || 24


THE PITCHING RECORD.

The pitching record of the champion team of 1888 is worthy of note in
regard to the figures showing the victories won and defeats sustained by
each pitcher in his games with the seven opposing clubs. Here is the
record in full, the names being given in the order of percentage of
victories. Despite this method of estimating the pitching strength there
is no questioning the fact of the superiority of Keefe, Welch and Titcomb
according to the record each made against the clubs they were opposed to:

 [Illustration: NEW YORK TEAM.
1 TITCOMB  2 KEIFE*    3 WHITNEY   4 *        5 WARD    6 RICHARDSON 7
FOSTER
8 WELCH    9 MUIRIL * 10 CRANE    11 GEORGE  12 EWING  13 CONNOR 14
HATFIELD.
          15 GORE     16 O'ROURKE 17 TIERNAN 18 MURPHY 19 BROWN]

[**Proofreaders note: In some cases the caption identifying the players
was indecipherable.  These are marked with an *]



       |     |  P  |     |     |     |  I  |     ||     |P
       |     |  h  |     |     |     |  n  |     ||     |e
       |     |  i  |     |     |     |  d  |  W  ||     |r
       |     |  l  |     |     |  P  |  i  |  a  ||     |   V
       |     |  a  |     |     |  i  |  a  |  s  ||     |c  i
       |  C  |  d  |     |  D  |  t  |  n  |  h  ||     |e  c
       |  h  |  e  |  B  |  e  |  t  |  a  |  i  ||  T  |n  t
       |  i  |  l  |  o  |  t  |  s  |  p  |  n  ||  o  |t  o
       |  c  |  p  |  s  |  r  |  b  |  o  |  g  ||  t  |.  r
       |  a  |  h  |  t  |  o  |  u  |  l  |  t  ||  a  |   i
       |  g  |  i  |  o  |  i  |  r  |  i  |  o  ||  l  |o  e
       |  o  |  a  |  n  |  t  |  g  |  s  |  n  ||  s  |f  s
       |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  ||  .  |   .
-------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----++-----+-----
       |W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.||W.|L.|
-------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+-----
Keefe  | 3| 4| 5| 1| 5| 4| 5| 0| 3| 1| 8| 2| 6| 0||35|12|.744
George | 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 1| 1| 0| 0| 0|| 2| 1|.666
Titcomb| 1| 1| 2| 0| 1| 1| 3| 3| 2| 2| 1| 0| 4| 1||14| 8|.636
Welsh  | 3| 6| 5| 4| 6| 3| 1| 2| 4| 2| 3| 1| 4| 1||26|19|.577
Weidman| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0| 0|| 1| 1|.500
Crane  | 1| 0| 2| 0| 0| 0| 1| 1| 0| 1| 0| 2| 1| 2|| 5| 6|.450
-------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+--+-----
Totals | 8|11|14| 5|12| 8|11| 7| 9| 7|14| 5|15| 4||83|47|
       |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |[1]

[Footnote 1: The game forfeited by Pittsburg is, of course, not included.]

In the pitching averages, based on the existing method of estimating
earned runs off the pitching, the record stands as follows:

Pitchers.|Per cent. earn'd|Per cent. of
         |Runs per Game.  |Base Hits.
Keefe    |           1.4* | .198
         |           [B]  |
Welch    |           1.47 | .201
Titcomb  |           1.82 | .212

[**Proofreaders note B: * undecipherable number**]

The other three pitchers did not pitch in a dozen games.

THE FULL LEAGUE RECORD.

The following record presents the scores of the total victories won by
every League Club each year since the National League was organized, the
table presenting the figures of thirteen consecutive seasons from 1876 to
1888 inclusive:


            | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | Y
            | 8 | 8 | 8 | 8 | 8 | 8 | 8 | 8 | 8 | 8 | 8 | 8 | 8 | r
            | 7 | 7 | 7 | 7 | 8 | 8 | 8 | 8 | 8 | 8 | 8 | 8 | 8 | s
            | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 0 | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | .
------------+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---
Chicago     | 52| 18| 30| 44| 67| 56| 55| 59| 62| 87| 90| 71| 77|13
Boston      | 39| 31| 41| 49| 40| 38| 45| 63| 73| 46| 56| 61| 70|13
Providence  | --| --| 38| 55| 52| 47| 52| 58| 84| 53| --| --| --| 8
Detroit     | --| --| --| --| --| 41| 42| 40| 28| 41| 87| 79| 68| 8
Buffalo     | --| --| --| 44| 24| 45| 45| 52| 64| 38| --| --| --| 7
Cleveland   | --| --| --| 24| 47| 36| 42| 55| 35| --| --| --| --| 6
New York    | --| --| --| --| --| --| --| 46| 62| 85| 75| 68| 84| 6
Philadelphia| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| 17| 39| 56| 71| 75| 69| 6
St Louis    | 45| 19| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| 38| 43| --| --| 4
Cincinnati  |  9| --| 37| 38| 21| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| 4
Troy        | --| --| --| 19| 41| 39| 35| --| --| --| --| --| --| 4
Worcester   | --| --| --| --| 40| 32| 18| --| --| --| --| --| --| 3
Washington  | --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| 26| 46| 48| 3
Indianapolis| --| --| 24| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| 37| 59| 3
Hartford    | 47| 24| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| 2
Louisville  | 30| 28| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| 2
Pittsburg   | --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| 55| 66| 2
Athletic    | 14| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| 1
Mutual      | 21| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| 1
Syracuse    | --| --| --| 15| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| 1
Milwaukee   | --| --| 15| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| 1
Kansas City | --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| --| 29| --| 1
------------+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---
Totals      |257|120|185|288|332|334|334|390|447|444|448|521|541|


THE COMPLETE RECORD.

Following is a summary showing the results of each year's campaign since
the organization of the League:

1876.
           |Won |Lost|Per cent.
-----------+----+----+--------
Chicago    | 52 | 14 | .788
Hartford   | 47 | 21 | .691
St. Louis  | 45 | 19 | .703
Boston     | 39 | 31 | .557
Louisville | 30 | 36 | .455
Mutual     | 21 | 35 | .375
Athletic   | 14 | 45 | .237
Cincinnati |  9 | 56 | .135

1877.
           |Won |Lost|Per cent.
-----------+----+----+--------
Boston     | 31 | 17 | .648
Louisville | 28 | 20 | .583
Hartford   | 24 | 24 | .500
St. Louis  | 19 | 29 | .396
Chicago    | 18 | 30 | .375

1878.
             |Won |Lost|Per cent.
-------------+----+----+--------
Boston       | 41 | 19 | .707
Cincinnati   | 37 | 23 | .617
Providence   | 33 | 27 | .550
Chicago      | 30 | 30 | .500
Indianapolis | 24 | 36 | .400
Milwaukee    | 15 | 45 | .250


1879.
           |Won |Lost|Per cent.
-----------+----+----+--------
Providence | 55 | 23 | .705
Boston     | 49 | 29 | .628
Chicago    | 44 | 32 | .579
Buffalo    | 44 | 32 | .579
Cincinnati | 38 | 36 | .514
Cleveland  | 24 | 53 | .312
Troy       | 19 | 56 | .253
Syracuse   | 15 | 27 | .357

1880.
           |Won |Lost|Per cent.
-----------+----+----+--------
Chicago    | 67 | 17 | .798
Providence | 52 | 32 | .619
Cleveland  | 47 | 37 | .559
Troy       | 41 | 42 | .494
Worcester  | 40 | 43 | .482
Boston     | 40 | 44 | .474
Buffalo    | 24 | 58 | .293
Cincinnati | 21 | 59 | .263

1881.
           |Won |Lost|Per cent.
-----------+----+----+--------
Chicago    | 56 | 28 | .667
Providence | 47 | 37 | .559
Buffalo    | 45 | 38 | .542
Detroit    | 41 | 43 | .488
Troy       | 39 | 45 | .464
Boston     | 38 | 45 | .458
Cleveland  | 36 | 48 | .429
Worcester  | 32 | 50 | .390

1882.
           |Won |Lost|Per cent.
-----------+----+----+--------
Chicago    | 55 | 29 | .655
Providence | 52 | 32 | .619
Buffalo    | 45 | 39 | .536
Boston     | 45 | 39 | .536
Cleveland  | 42 | 40 | .512
Detroit    | 42 | 41 | .506
Troy       | 35 | 48 | .422
Worcester  | 18 | 66 | .214

1883.
             |Won |Lost|Per cent.
------------+----+----+--------
Boston      | 63 | 35 | .643
Chicago     | 59 | 39 | .602
Providence  | 58 | 40 | .592
Cleveland   | 55 | 42 | .567
Buffalo     | 52 | 45 | .539
New York    | 46 | 50 | .479
Detroit     | 40 | 58 | .408
Philadelphia| 17 | 81 | .173

1884.
            |Won |Lost|Per cent.
------------+----+----+--------
Providence  | 84 | 28 | .750
Boston      | 73 | 38 | .658
Buffalo     | 64 | 47 | .577
Chicago     | 62 | 50 | .554
New York    | 62 | 50 | .554
Philadelphia| 39 | 73 | .348
Cleveland   | 35 | 77 | .313
Detroit     | 28 | 84 | .250

1885.
            |Won |Lost|Per cent.
------------+----+----+--------
Chicago     | 87 | 25 | .776
New York    | 85 | 27 | .758
Philadelphia| 56 | 54 | .509
Providence  | 53 | 57 | .481
Boston      | 46 | 66 | .410
Detroit     | 41 | 67 | .379
Buffalo     | 38 | 74 | .339
St. Louis   | 36 | 72 | .333

1886.
            |Won |Lost|Per cent.
------------+----+----+--------
Chicago     | 90 | 34 | .725
Detroit     | 87 | 36 | .707
New York    | 75 | 44 | .630
Philadelphia| 71 | 43 | .622
Boston      | 56 | 61 | .478
St. Louis   | 43 | 79 | .352
Kansas City | 30 | 91 | .247
Washington  | 28 | 92 | .233

1887.
            |Won|Lost|Per cent.
------------+----+----+--------
Detroit     | 79 | 45 | .637
Philadelphia| 75 | 48 | .610
Chicago     | 71 | 50 | .587
New York    | 68 | 55 | .553
Boston      | 61 | 60 | .504
Pittsburg   | 55 | 69 | .444
Indianapolis| 46 | 76 | .377
Washington  | 37 | 89 | .294

1888.
            |Won |Lost|Per cent.
------------+----+----+--------
New York    | 84 | 47 | .641
Chicago     | 77 | 58 | .510
Philadelphia| 69 | 61 | .531
Boston      | 70 | 64 | .522
Detroit     | 68 | 63 | .519
Pittsburg   | 66 | 68 | .493
Indianapolis| 50 | 85 | .370
Washington  | 48 | 86 | .358

A summary of the above shows that the Chicago club won the championship
six times; the Boston club three times; the Providence club twice, and the
Detroit and New York clubs once each. The Chicago club has the best record
of a single season--90 victories and 34 defeats-and the highest percentage
of victories .798. The only clubs which played in every single season were
the Chicago and Boston clubs.

THE LEAGUE AVERAGES FOR 1888.

The following is the official batting record of players members of League
Clubs who have taken part in fifteen or more championship games.

SEASON OF 1888.

[**Proofreaders note: Table has been split into two parts in order to fit
on page.**]
  |            |            | G | T |   |
  |            |            | a | i | R |
  |            |            | m | m | u |
  |            |            | e | e | n |
  |            |            | s | s | s |
  |            |            |   |   |   |
  |            |            | P | a | S |
  |            |            | l | t | c |
R |            |            | a |   | o |
a |            |            | y | B | r |
n |            |            | e | a | e |Ave.
k |            |            | d | t | d |per
. |NAME.       |CLUB        | . | . | . |Game.
--+------------+------------+---+---+---+-----
 1| Anson      |Chicago     |134|515|101| 0.75
 2| Beckley    |Pittsburg   | 71|283| 35| 0.49
 3| Ryan       |Chicago     |130|549|115| 0.88
 4| Kelly      |Boston      |105|440| 85| 0.81
 5|{Ewing      |New York    |103|415| 83| 0.80
  |{Brouthers  |Detroit     |129|522|118| 0.91
 6| Quinn      |Boston      | 38|156| 19| 0.50
 7| White      |Detroit     |125|527| 75| 0.60
 8| Johnston   |Boston      |135|585|102| 0.75
 9| Tiernan    |New York    |113|443| 75| 0.66
10| Connor     |New York    |134|481| 98| 0.63
11| Richardson |Detroit     | 57|266| 60| 1.05
12|{Van Haltren|Chicago     | 81|318| 46| 0.56
  |{Nash       |Boston      |135|526| 71| 0.52
13| Duffy      |Chicago     | 71|298| 60| 0.84
14| Thompson   |Detroit     | 55|238| 51| 0.92
15| Hines      |Indianapolis|132|513| 84| 0.63
16|{Rowe       |Detroit     |105|451| 62| 0.59
  |{Miller     |Pittsburg   |103|404| 50| 0.48
17| Conway     |Detroit     | 44|167| 28| 0.63
18| Hoy        |Washington  |136|503| 77| 0.56
19|{Buckley    |Indianapolis| 71|260| 27| 0.38
  |{O'Rourke   |New York    |107|409| 50| 0.46
20| Brown      |New York    | 17| 59|  4| 0.23
21| Glasscock  |Indianapolis|112|442| 63| 0.56
22|{Hanlon     |Detroit     |108|459| 64| 0.59
  |{McGuire    |Phil. &     | 15| 64| 17| 0.46
  |            |Detr't.     |   |   |   |
23| Bennett    |Detroit     | 72|258| 32| 0.44
24|{Dunlap     |Pittsburg   | 81|317| 41| 0.50
  |{Denny      |Indianapolis|126|524| 92| 0.73
25| Nicholson  |Detroit     | 24| 85| 11| 0.46
26| Sutcliffe  |Detroit     | 49|191| 17| 0.34
27| Pettit     |Chicago     | 43|169| 24| 0.56
28| Ward       |New York    |122|510| 70| 0.57
29|{Williamson |Chicago     |132|452| 75| 0.57
  |{Beaton     |Detroit     | 16| 56|  8| 0.50
30| Pfeffer    |Chicago     |135|517| 90| 0.66
31| Ganzell    |Detroit     | 93|386| 45| 0.48
32|{Clements   |Philadelphia| 85|323| 26| 0.30
  |{Brown      |Boston      |107|426| 62| 0.58
  |{Ray        |Boston      | 50|206| 26| 0.52
33| Farrar     |Philadelphia|130|504| 53| 0.40
34|{Sanders    |Philadelphia| 57|236| 27| 0.47
  |{Getzein    |Detroit     | 45|167| 14| 0.31
  |{Slattery   |NewYork     |103|391| 49| 0.47
35| Twitchell  |Detroit     |130|524| 71| 0.54
36| Carroll    |Pittsburg   | 90|362| 61| 0.63
37| Bassett    |Indianapolis|128|481| 57| 0.44
38|{Hornung    |Boston      |107|431| 61| 0.57
  |{Wise       |Boston      |104|417| 66| 0.63
39|{Burns      |Chicago     |134|483| 60| 0.44
  |{Andrews    |Philadelphia|123|524| 74| 0.60
  |{Myers      |Indianapolis| 66|248| 35| 0.53
40| Shoeneck   |Indianapolis| 48|169| 15| 0.31
41|{Sullivan   |Chicago     | 75|314| 40| 0.53
  |{Fogarty    |Philadelphia|120|451| 71| 0.59
42| Kuhne      |Pittsburg   |137|520| 60| 0.44
43| Sunday     |Pittsburg   |119|501| 68| 0.57
44| Farrell    |Chicago     | 63|241| 34| 0.54
45|{Wood       |Philadelphia|105|429| 67| 0.63
  |{Coleman    |Pittsburg   |115|434| 48| 0.41
46|{Tate       |Boston      | 40|148| 18| 0.45
  |{Healy      |Indianapolis| 37|131| 14| 0.38
47| Delehanty  |Philadelphia| 74|290| 40| 0.54
48| Richardson |New York    |135|561| 82| 0.60
49|{Daily      |Washington  |110|453| 56| 0.50
  |{O'Brien    |Washington  |133|528| 42| 0.31
50|{Wilmot     |Washington  |119|473| 61| 0.51
  |{Dalrymple  |Pittsburg   | 56|223| 19| 0.33
51| Irwin      |Washington  | 37|126| 14| 0.38
52|{Irwin      |Philadelphia|124|444| 51| 0.41
  |{Seery      |Indianapolis|133|500| 87| 0.65
  |{Gore       |New York    | 64|254| 37| 0.57
53|{McGeachy   |Indianapolis|118|452| 45| 0.38
  |{Esterbrook |Indianapolis| 64|246| 21| 0.32
  |{Whitney    |NewYork     | 90|328| 28| 0.31
54|{Sutton     |Boston      | 28|110| 16| 0.57
  |{Daily      |Indianapolis| 57|202| 14| 0.24
55|{Mulvey     |Philadelphia| 99|394| 37| 0.37
  |{Radbourne  |Boston      | 24| 79|  6| 0.25
56|{Cleveland  |N.Y.& Pitts.| 40|145| 17| 0.42
  |{Shomberg   |Indianapolis| 29|112| 11| 0.38
57| Darling    |Chicago     | 20| 75| 13| 0.65
58| Maul       |Pittsburg   | 73|255| 21| 0.29
59|{Myers      |Washington  |132|502| 47| 0.35
  |{Smith      |Pittsburg   |130|477| 61| 0.44
60| Hallman    |Philadelphia| 16| 63|  5| 0.31
61| Gleason    |Philadelphia| 23| 83|  4| 0.17
62| Campau     |Detroit     | 70|251| 28| 0.40
63|{Scheffler  |Detroit     | 27| 94| 17| 0.63
  |{Burdock    |Boston      | 21| 79|  5| 0.24
64| Donnelly   |Washington  |122|428| 43| 0.35
65| Widner     |Washington  | 15| 60|  4| 0.26
66| Morrill    |Boston      |134|486| 60| 0.44
67| Arundel    |Washington  | 16| 51|  2| 0.12
68|{Clarkson   |Boston      | 54|205| 20| 0.37
  |{Fields     |Pittsburg   | 44|169| 22| 0.50
69|{Schriver   |Philadelphia| 39|134| 15| 0.38
  |{McShannic  |Pittsburg   | 26| 98|  5| 0.19
70| Bastian    |Philadelphia| 80|275| 31| 0.38
71| Daily      |Chicago     | 65|219| 34| 0.52
72| Welch      |New York    | 47|169| 16| 0.34
73| Mack       |Washington  | 85|300| 49| 0.57
74| Schock     |Washington  | 90|317| 46| 0.51
75|{Fuller     |Washington  | 49|170| 11| 0.22
  |{Shreve     |Indianapolis| 36|115| 10| 0.28
76|{Flint      |Chicago     | 22| 77|  6| 0.27
  |{Hatfield   |New York    | 27|105|  7| 0.26
77| O'Rourke   |Boston      | 20| 74|  3| 0.15
78| Buffinton  |Philadelphia| 44|156| 13| 0.29
79| Whitney    |Washington  | 42|141| 13| 0.31
80| Murphy     |New York    | 28|106| 11| 0.39
81| Klusman    |Boston      | 28|107|  9| 0.32
82|{Madden     |Boston      | 19| 67|  7| 0.36
  |{Krock      |Chicago     | 39|134|  9| 0.23
83|{Deasley    |Washington  | 34|127|  6| 0.17
  |{Wells      |Detroit     | 16| 57|  5| 0.31
84| Glenn      |Boston      | 19| 65|  8| 0.42
85| Casey      |Philadelphia| 33|118| 11| 0.33
86| Baldwin    |Chicago     | 30|106| 11| 0.37
87|{Sowders    |Boston      | 35|122| 14| 0.40
  |{Burdick    |Indianapolis| 20| 68|  6| 0.30
  |{Foster     |New York    | 37|136| 15| 0.40
88| Boyle      |Indianapolis| 37|125| 13| 0.35
89| Galvin     |Pittsburg   | 50|175|  6| 0.12
90| Gruber     |Detroit     | 27| 92|  8| 0.29
91| O'Day      |Washington  | 47|166|  6| 0.12
92| Staley     |Pittsburg   | 24| 85|  6| 0.25
93| Keefe      |New York    | 51|181| 10| 0.19
94| Titcomb    |New York    | 23| 82|  6|0.26
95| Morris     |Pittsburg   | 54|186| 12|0.22

  |            | F |    |   |     |   |
  |            | I |    |   |     |   |
  |            | r |    |   |     |   |
  |            | s |    |   |     | B |
  |            | t |    | T |     | a |
  |            |   |  P | o |     | s |
  |            | B |  e | t |     | e |
  |            | a |  r | a |     | s |
  |            | s |  c | l |     |   |
  |            | e |  e |   |     | S |
  |            |   |  n | B |     | t |
R |            | H |  t | a |     | o |
a |            | i |  a | s |     | l |
n |            | t |  g | e |Ave. | e |Ave.
k |            | s |  e | s |per  | n |per
. |NAME.       | . |  . | . |Game.| . |Game.
--+------------+---+----+---+-----+---+-----
 1| Anson      |177|.343|252| 1.88| 28| 0.20
 2| Beckley    | 97|.342|121| 1.70| 20| 0.28
 3| Ryan       |182|.331|285| 2.19| 60| 0.46
 4| Kelly      |140|.318|205| 1.95| 56| 0.53
 5|{Ewing      |127|.306|195| 1.89| 53| 0.51
  |{Brouthers  |160|.306|270| 1.86| 34| 0.26
 6| Quinn      | 47|.301| 43| 1.92| 12| 0.31
 7| White      |157|.298|200| 1.60| 12| 0.09
 8| Johnston   |173|.295|276| 2.04| 35| 0.26
 9| Tiernan    |130|.293|182| 1.61| 52| 0.46
10| Connor     |140|.291|224| 1.67| 27| 0.20
11| Richardson | 77|.289|117| 2.05| 13| 0.23
12|{Van Haltren| 90|.283|130| 1.60| 21| 0.26
  |{Nash       |149|.283|209| 1.54| 20| 0.15
13| Duffy      | 84|.282|121| 1.70| 13| 0.18
14| Thompson   | 67|.281|111| 2.02|  5| 0.09
15| Hines      |144|.280|186| 1.40| 31| 0.23
16|{Rowe       |125|.277|168| 1.60| 10| 0.09
  |{Miller     |112|.277|139| 1.35| 27| 0.26
17| Conway     | 46|.275| 59| 1.34|  1| 0.02
18| Hoy        |138|.274|171| 1.26| 82| 0.60
19|{Buckley    | 71|.273| 95| 1.33|  4| 0.05
  |{O'Rourke   |112|.273|154| 1.44| 25| 0.23
20| Brown      | 16|.271| 17| 1.00|  1| 0.06
21| Glasscock  |119|.269|145| 1.29| 48| 0.43
22|{Hanlon     |122|.265|157| 1.45| 38| 0.35
  |{McGuire    | 17|.265| 23| 1.35|  0| 0.00
23| Bennett    | 68|.263|102| 1.41|  4| 0.05
24|{Dunlap     | 83|.261|106| 1.30| 24| 0.29
  |{Denny      |137|.261|220| 1.74| 32| 0.25
25| Nicholson  | 22|.259| 33| 1.37|  6| 0.25
26| Sutcliffe  | 49|.257| 59| 1.20|  6| 0.12
27| Pettit     | 43|.254| 62| 1.44|  7| 0.16
28| Ward       |128|.251|154| 1.26| 38| 0.31
29|{Williamson |113|.250|175| 1.32| 25| 0.19
  |{Beaton     | 14|.250| 25| 1.56|  1| 0.06
30| Pfeffer    |129|.249|193| 1.43| 64| 0.47
31| Ganzell    | 96|.248|119| 1.28| 12| 0.13
32|{Clements   | 80|.247|100| 1.17|  3| 0.03
  |{Brown      |104|.247|155| 1.45| 46| 0.43
  |{Ray        | 51|.247| 65| 1.30|  7| 0.14
33| Farrar     |124|.246|155| 1.19| 21| 0.17
34|{Sanders    | 58|.245| 74| 1.29| 13| 0.22
  |{Getzein    | 41|.245| 50| 1.11|  6| 0.13
  |{Slattery   | 96|.245|122| 1.18| 26| 0.25
35| Twitchell  |128|.244|167| 1.28| 14| 0.10
36| Carroll    | 88|.243|117| 1.22| 18| 0.19
37| Bassett    |116|.241|147| 1.15| 24| 0.19
38|{Hornung    |103|.239|134| 1.25| 29| 0.27
  |{Wise       |100|.239|155| 1.49| 33| 0.31
39|{Burns      |115|.238|152| 1.13| 34| 0.25
  |{Andrews    |125|.238|157| 1.27| 35| 0.28
  |{Myers      | 59|.238| 72| 1.09| 28| 0.42
40| Shoeneck   | 40|.237| 44| 0.91| 11| 0.23
41|{Sullivan   | 74|.235|117| 1.56|  9| 0.12
  |{Fogarty    |106|.235|137| 1.14| 58| 0.48
42| Kuhne      |122|.234|175| 1.28| 34| 0.25
43| Sunday     |117|.233|140| 1.18| 71| 0.59
44| Farrell    | 56|.232| 80| 1.27|  8| 0.12
45|{Wood       | 99|.230|154| 1.46| 20| 0.19
  |{Coleman    |100|.230|118| 1.02| 15| 0.13
46|{Tate       | 34|.229| 44| 1.10|  3| 0.07
  |{Healy      | 30|.229| 42| 1.10|  5| 0.13
47| Delehanty  | 66|.227| 82| 1.10| 38| 0.51
48| Richardson |127|.226|176| 1.30| 35| 0.26
49|{Daily      |102|.225|139| 1.26| 44| 0.40
  |{O'Brien    |119|.225|167| 1.25| 10| 0.08
50|{Wilmot     |106|.224|146| 1.22| 46| 0.38
  |{Dalrymple  | 50|.224| 64| 1.14|  7| 0.12
51| Irwin      | 28|.222| 36| 0.97| 15| 0.40
52|{Irwin      | 98|.220|115| 0.92| 19| 0.15
  |{Seery      |110|.220|163| 1.23| 80| 0.60
  |{Gore       | 56|.220| 72| 1.12| 11| 0.17
53|{McGeachy   | 99|.219|115| 0.97| 49| 0.41
  |{Esterbrook | 54|.219| 61| 0.95| 11| 0.17
  |{Whitney    | 72|.219| 87| 0.96|  7| 0.07
54|{Sutton     | 24|.218| 32| 1.14| 10| 0.35
  |{Daily      | 44|.218| 52| 0.91| 15| 0.26
55|{Mulvey     | 85|.215|105| 1.06| 18| 0.12
  |{Radbourne  | 17|.215| 18| 0.75|  4| 0.16
56|{Cleveland  | 31|.214| 51| 1.27|  4| 0.10
  |{Shomberg   | 24|.214| 33| 1.13|  6| 0.20
57| Darling    | 16|.213| 27| 1.35|  0| 0.00
58| Maul       | 54|.211| 71| 0.97|  9| 0.12
59|{Myers      |104|.207|139| 1.05| 20| 0.15
  |{Smith      | 99|.207|131| 1.00| 37| 0.27
60| Hallman    | 13|.206| 19| 1.19|  1| 0.06
61| Gleason    | 17|.205| 20| 0.87|  3| 0.13
62| Campau     | 51|.203| 65| 0.93| 27| 0.38
63|{Scheffler  | 19|.202| 24| 0.89|  4| 0.15
  |{Burdock    | 16|.202| 16| 0.76|  1| 0.05
64| Donnelly   | 86|.201|104| 0.85| 44| 0.36
65| Widner     | 12|.200| 12| 0.80|  1| 0.06
66| Mo*rill    | 96|.197|135| 1.00| 21| 0.15
67| Arundel    | 10|.196| 12| 0.75|  1| 0.06
68|{Clarkson   | 40|.195| 53| 0.98|  5| 0.09
  |{Fields     | 33|.195| 47| 1.07|  9| 0.20
69|{Schriver   | 26|.194| 36| 0.92|  2| 0.05
  |{McShannic  | 19|.194| 20| 0.77|  3| 0.11
70| Bastian    | 53|.192| 62| 0.77| 12| 0.15
71| Daily      | 42|.191| 54| 0.83| 10| 0.15
72| Welch      | 32|.189| 42| 0.89|  4| 0.08
73| Mack       | 56|.186| 77| 0.90| 31| 0.36
74| Schock     | 58|.183| 77| 0.85| 23| 0.25
75|{Fuller     | 31|.182| 38| 0.77|  6| 0.12
  |{Shreve     | 21|.182| 24| 0.66|  5| 0.14
76|{Flint      | 14|.181| 17| 0.77|  1| 0.04
  |{Hatfield   | 19|.181| 20| 0.74|  8| 0.29
77| O'Rourke   | 13|.175| 13| 0.65|  2| 0.10
78| Buffinton  | 27|.173| 32| 0.72|  1| 0.02
79| Whitney    | 24|.170| 27| 0.64|  3| 0.07
80| Murphy     | 18|.169| 20| 0.71|  3| 0.10
81| Klusman    | 18|.168| 28| 1.00|  3| 0.11
82|{Madden     | 11|.164| 11| 0.58|  4| 0.21
  |{Krock      | 22|.164| 25| 0.64|  1| 0.02
83|{Deasley    | 20|.157| 23| 0.67|  2| 0.06
  |{Wells      |  9|.157| 10| 0.63|  0| 0.00
84| Glenn      | 10|.154| 12| 0.63|  0| 0.00
85| Casey      | 18|.152| 22| 0.66|  2| 0.06
86| Baldwin    | 16|.151| 24| 0.80|  4| 0.13
87|{Sowders    | 18|.147| 20| 0.57|  1| 0.03
  |{Burdick    | 10|.147| 11| 0.55|  0| 0.00
  |{Foster     | 20|.147| 27| 0.73| 13| 0.35
88| Boyle      | 18|.144| 21| 0.57|  1| 0.03
89| Galvin     | 25|.143| 31| 0.62|  4| 0.08
90| Gruber     | 13|.141| 17| 0.63|  0| 0.00
91| O'Day      | 23|.138| 25| 0.53|  3| 0.06
92| Staley     | 11|.129| 12| 0.50|  2| 0.08
93| Keefe      | 23|.127| 33| 0.64|  3| 0.06
94| Titcomb    | 10|.122| 13| 0.56|  5| 0.21
95| Morris     | 19|.102| 23| 0.42|  2| 0.04


FIELDING RECORD.

Of Players, Members of League Clubs, who have taken part in fifteen or
more Championship Games, Season of 1888.

FIRST BASEMEN.
  |           |            |   |    | T | F |    | P
  |           |            |   |  N | i | i |    | e
  |           |            |   |  u | m | e |  T | r
  |           |            | G |  m | e | l |  o | c
  |           |            | a |  b | s | d |  t | e
  |           |            | m |  e |   | i |  a | n
  |           |            | e |  r | A | n |  l | t
  |           |            | s |    | s | g |    | a  A
  |           |            |   |  P | s |   |  C | g  c
  |           |            | P |  u | i | E |  h | e  c
  |           |            | l |  t | s | r |  a |    e
R |           |            | a |    | t | r |  n |    p
a |           |            | y |  O | i | o |  c |    t
n |           |            | e |  u | n | r |  e |    e
k |           |            | d |  t | g | s |  s |    d
. |NAME.      |CLUB.       | . |  . | . | . |  . |    .
--+-----------+------------+---+----+---+---+----+-----
 1| Anderson  |Chicago     |134|1314| 65| 20|1399| .985
 2| Connor    |New York    |133|1337| 43| 26|1406| .981
 3| Beckley   |Pittsburg   | 71| 744| 19| 16| 779| .979
  | Farrar    |Philadelphia|130|1345| 53| 30|1428| .979
  | Morrill   |Boston      |134|1398| 72| 31|1501| .979
 4| Esterbrook|Indianapolis| 61| 628| 20| 16| 654| .976
 5| Coleman   |Pittsburg   | 25| 235|  4|  6| 245| .975
  | O'Brien   |Washington  |132|1272| 38| 33|1343| .975
 6| Shoeneck  |Indianapolis| 48| 501| 16| 14| 531| .973
 7| Brouthers |Detroit     |129|1345| 48| 42|1435| .970
 8| Maul      |Pittsburg   | 37| 392|  9| 13| 414| .968
 9| Shomberg  |Indianapolis| 15| 136|  0|  5| 141| .964

SECOND BASEMEN.
  |           |            |   |    | T | F |    | P
  |           |            |   |  N | i | i |    | e
  |           |            |   |  u | m | e |  T | r
  |           |            | G |  m | e | l |  o | c
  |           |            | a |  b | s | d |  t | e
  |           |            | m |  e |   | i |  a | n
  |           |            | e |  r | A | n |  l | t
  |           |            | s |    | s | g |    | a  A
  |           |            |   |  P | s |   |  C | g  c
  |           |            | P |  u | i | E |  h | e  c
  |           |            | l |  t | s | r |  a |    e
R |           |            | a |    | t | r |  n |    p
a |           |            | y |  O | i | o |  c |    t
n |           |            | e |  u | n | r |  e |    e
k |           |            | d |  t | g | s |  s |    d
. |NAME.      |CLUB.       | . |  . | . | . |  . |    .
--+-----------+------------+---+----+---+---+----+-----
 1| Bastian   |Philidelphia| 65| 145|258| 23| 427| .946
 2| Richardson|New York    |135| 321|423| 46| 790| .942
 3| Danlap    |Pittsburg   | 81| 237|276| 33| 546| .939
 4| Nicholson |Detroit     | 24|  44| 71|  8| 123| .935
 5| Pfeffer   |Chicago     |135| 421|457| 65| 943| .931
 6| Richardson|Detroit     | 57| 173|185| 29| 387| .925
 7| Bassett   |Indianapolis|128| 250|423| 57| 730| .921
 8| Meyers    |Washington  |132| 271|399| 60| 730| .918
 9| Kinsman   |Boston      | 28|  63| 75| 13| 151| .914
10| Quinn     |  "         | 38|  97|115| 20| 232| .913
11| Smith     |Pittsburg   | 56| 131|184| 33| 348| .905
12| Nash      |Boston      | 31|  90|108| 21| 219| .904
13| Burdock   |  "         | 21|  53| 68| 13| 134| .903
14| Ganzell   |Detroit     | 51| 110|168| 31| 309| .899
15| Delehanty |Philadelphia| 56| 129|170| 44| 343| .871

THIRD BASEMEN.
  |           |            |   |    | T | F |    | P
  |           |            |   |  N | i | i |    | e
  |           |            |   |  u | m | e |  T | r
  |           |            | G |  m | e | l |  o | c
  |           |            | a |  b | s | d |  t | e
  |           |            | m |  e |   | i |  a | n
  |           |            | e |  r | A | n |  l | t
  |           |            | s |    | s | g |    | a  A
  |           |            |   |  P | s |   |  C | g  c
  |           |            | P |  u | i | E |  h | e  c
  |           |            | l |  t | s | r |  a |    e
R |           |            | a |    | t | r |  n |    p
a |           |            | y |  O | i | o |  c |    t
n |           |            | e |  u | n | r |  e |    e
k |           |            | d |  t | g | s |  s |    d
. |NAME.      |CLUB.       | . |  . | . | . |  . |    .
--+-----------+------------+---+----+---+---+----+-----
 1| Nash      |Boston      |104| 139|250| 37| 426| .913
 2| Kuhne     |Pittsburg   | 74|  95|166| 26| 287| .909
 3| McShannie |    "       | 26|  39| 49|  9|  97| .907
 4| Burns     |Chicago     |134| 194|273| 49| 516| .905
 5| Denny     |Indianapolis| 96| 158|214| 44| 416| .894
 6| Mulvey    |Philadelphia| 99|  87|174| 32| 293| .890
 7| Whitney   |New York    | 90|  90|184| 35| 309| .886
 8| Donnelly  |Washington  |117| 126|230| 51| 407| .874
 9| Sutton    |Boston      | 27|  82| 47| 13|  92| .858
10| White     |Detroit     |125| 146|244| 65| 455| .857
11| Ewing     |New York    | 21|  32| 29| 15|  76| .802
12| Buckley   |Indianapolis| 21|  17| 28| 12|  57| .789
13| Cleveland |NY & Pitts'g| 40|  27| 57| 23| 107| .785

SHORT STOPS.
  |           |            |   |    | T | F |    | P
  |           |            |   |  N | i | i |    | e
  |           |            |   |  u | m | e |  T | r
  |           |            | G |  m | e | l |  o | c
  |           |            | a |  b | s | d |  t | e
  |           |            | m |  e |   | i |  a | n
  |           |            | e |  r | A | n |  l | t
  |           |            | s |    | s | g |    | a  A
  |           |            |   |  P | s |   |  C | g  c
  |           |            | P |  u | i | E |  h | e  c
  |           |            | l |  t | s | r |  a |    e
R |           |            | a |    | t | r |  n |    p
a |           |            | y |  O | i | o |  c |    t
n |           |            | e |  u | n | r |  e |    e
k |           |            | d |  t | g | s |  s |    d
. |NAME.      |CLUB.       | . |  . | . | . |  . |    .
--+-----------+------------+---+----+---+---+----+-----
 1| Denny     |Indianapolis| 23|  65| 88| 14| 167| .916
 2| Kuhne     |Pittsburgh  | 63| 112|159| 25| 296| .915
 3| Smith     |Pittsburgh  | 74|  90|246| 37| 373| .900
 3|{Glasscock |Indianapolis|109| 201|334| 59| 594| .900
  |{Irwin     |Philadelphia|121| 204|374| 64| 642| .900
  |{Shock     |Washington  | 52|  84|168| 28| 280| .900
  |{Sutcliffe |Detroit     | 24|  39| 88| 14| 141| .900
 4| Williamson|Chicago     |132| 120|375| 62| 557| .888
 5| Wise      |Boston      | 89| 179|271| 57| 507| .887
 6| Ray       |Boston      | 47|  58|130| 26| 214| .878
 7| Rowe      |Detroit     |103| 133|312| 72| 517| .860
 8| Irwin     |Washington  | 27|  54| 87| 23| 164| .859
 9| Ward      |New York    |122| 185|331| 86| 602| .857
10| Fuller    |Washington  | 47|  67|140| 38| 245| .854

FIELDERS
  |            |            |   |    | T | F |    | P
  |            |            |   |  N | i | i |    | e
  |            |            |   |  u | m | e |  T | r
  |            |            | G |  m | e | l |  o | c
  |            |            | a |  b | s | d |  t | e
  |            |            | m |  e |   | i |  a | n
  |            |            | e |  r | A | n |  l | t
  |            |            | s |    | s | g |    | a  A
  |            |            |   |  P | s |   |  C | g  c
  |            |            | P |  u | i | E |  h | e  c
  |            |            | l |  t | s | r |  a |    e
R |            |            | a |    | t | r |  n |    p
a |            |            | y |  O | i | o |  c |    t
n |            |            | e |  u | n | r |  e |    e
k |            |            | d |  t | g | s |  s |    d
. |NAME.       |CLUB.       | . |  . | . | . |  . |    .
--+------------+------------+---+----+---+---+----+-----
 1|{O'Rourke   |New York    | 87| 136| 13|  6| 149| .959
  |{Tiernan    |New York    |113| 174| 16|  8| 198| .959
 2| Glenn      |Boston      | 19|  42|  2|  2|  46| .956
 3| Sanders    |Philadelphia| 25|  38|  5|  2|  46| .955
 4| Hornung    |Boston      |107| 151| 10|  9| 170| .947
 5| Maul       |Pittsburgh  | 34|  59|  8|  4|  71| .943
 6| Seery      |Indianapolis|133| 258| 19| 18| 295| .939
 7| Sunday     |Pittsburgh  |119| 292| 27| 21| 340| .938
 8|{Campau     |Detroit     | 70| 101| 10|  8| 119| .932
  |{McGeachy   |Indianapolis|117| 194| 27| 16| 237| .932
 9| Petit      |Chicago     | 43|  46|  8|  4|  58| .931
10| Fogarty    |Philadelphia|116| 239| 26| 20| 285| .929
11|{Sullivan   |Chicago     | 75| 114| 13| 10| 137| .927
  |{Coleman    |Pittsburgh  | 90| 160| 20| 14| 194| .927
12|{Slattery   |New York    |103| 187| 16| 18| 221| .918
  |{Hanlon     |Detroit     |108| 230|  7| 21| 258| .918
13| Miller     |Pittsburgh  | 32|  58|  7|  6|  71| .915
14| Daily      |Washington  |100| 179| 19| 19| 217| .912
15| Hines      |Indianapolis|124| 255| 13| 26| 294| .911
15| Delehanty  |Philadelphia| 17|  28|  3|  3|  34| .911
16| Duffy      |Chicago     | 67| 103| 19| 12| 134| .910
17| Dalrymple  |Pittsburgh  | 57|  80|  9|  9|  98| .908
18| Wood       |Philadelphia|103| 175| 15| 20| 210| .904
19| Andrews    |Philadelphia|123| 210| 23| 25| 258| .903
20| Johnston   |Boston      |135| 286| 30| 36| 352| .897
20| Hoy        |Washington  |136| 296| 26| 37| 359| .897
21| Brown      |Boston      |107| 172| 18| 22| 212| .896
22| Shock      |Washington  | 35|  59|  7|  8|  74| .892
23| Fields     |Pittsburgh  | 29|  49|  6|  7|  62| .887
24| Twitchell  |Detroit     |129| 195| 13| 27| 235| .885
25| Farrell    |Chicago     | 31|  50|  3|  7|  60| .883
26| Thompson   | Detroit    | 55|  86|  4| 12| 102| .882
27| Ryan       |Chicago     |125| 217| 84| 35| 286| .877
28| Van Haltren|Chicago     | 54|  73|  9| 12|  94| .872
28| Wilmot     |Washington  |119| 260| 19| 41| 320| .872
29| Foster       |New York  | 37|  64|  5| 12|  81| .851
30| Scheffler    |Detroit   | 27|  49|  1|  9|  59| .847
31| Gore         |New York  | 64|  88|  4| 18| 110| .836
32| Carroll      |Pittsburg | 38|  45|  2| 10|  57| .824
33| Kelly        |Boston    | 31|  28|  4| 12|  44| .727

CATCHERS' AVERAGES.

  |          |            |  |   | T | F|  |   | P
  |          |            |  | N | i | i|  |   | e
  |          |            |  | u | m | e|  | T | r
  |          |            | G| m | e | l| P| o | c
  |          |            | a| b | s | d| a| t | e
  |          |            | m| e |   | i| s| a | n
  |          |            | e| r | A | n| s| l | t
  |          |            | s|   | s | g| e|   | a  A
  |          |            |  | P | s |  | d| C | g  c
  |          |            | P| u | i | E|  | h | e  c
  |          |            | l| t | s | r| B| a |    e
R |          |            | a|   | t | r| A| n |    p
a |          |            | y| O | i | o| L| c |    t
n |          |            | e| u | n | r| L| e |    e
k |          |            | d| t | g | s| S| s |    d
. |NAME.     |CLUB.       | .| . | . | .| .| . |    .
--+----------+------------+--+---+---+--+--+---+-----
 1| Bennett  |Detroit     |72|424| 94|18|14|550| .941
 2| Ganzell  |Detroit     |25|156| 41| 9|15|221| .891
 3| Daily    |Chicago     |69|400|107|33|36|576| .880
 4| Clements |Philadelphia|84|494|104|47|39|684| .874
 5| Ewing    |New York    |78|480|143|35|65|723| .861
 6| Wells    |Detroit     |16| 96| 25|11| 9|141| .858
 7| Myers    |Indianapolis|46|211| 63|21|27|322| .851
 8| Flint    |Chicago     |22| 96| 42|11|14|163| .846
 9| Mack     |Washington  |79|361|152|47|48|608| .843
10|{Deasley  |Washington  |31|177| 60|20|25|282| .840
  |{Murphy   |New York    |28|186| 56|23|23|288| .840
11| Darling  |Chicago     |20|139| 26|12|21|198| .833
12| Buckley  |Indianapolis|48|213| 60|31|28|332| .822
13| Miller   |Pittsburg   |68|268| 76|35|48|427| .805
14| O'Rourke |Boston      |20| 89| 37|17|14|157| .803
15| Tate     |Boston      |40|188| 64|43|19|314| .802
16| Kelly    |Boston      |74|367|146|77|54|644| .796
17| Carroll  |Pittsburg   |53|265| 58|37|46|406| .795
18| Daily    |Indianapolis|42|215| 69|34|41|359| .791
19| Brown    |New York    |17|134| 24|19|26|203| .778
20| Farrell  |Chicago     |31|171| 50|32|34|287| .770
21| Schriver |Philadelphia|27|148| 39|28|29|244| .760
22| Arundel  |Washington  |16| 63| 16|15|21|115| .687

PITCHERS' RECORD IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

[**Proofreaders note: To fit the page I broke this chart into 2 tables*]



           |             |  |T    |R   |     |R   |     |F  M|
           |             |  |I    |u   |     |u   |     |i  a|
           |             |  |m    |n   |     |n   |     |r  d|
           |             |  |e    |s   |     |s   |     |s  e|
           |             |  |s    |    |     |    |     |t   |
           |             | G|   o |S  b|     |E  b|     |   b|
           |             | a|a  f |C  y|     |a  y|     |B  y|
           |             | m|t    |o   |     |r   |     |a   | P
           |             | e|   O |r  O|     |n  O|     |s  O| e
           |             | s|B  p |e  p|     |e  p|     |e  p| r
           |             |  |a  p |d  p|     |d  p|     |   p| c
           |             | P|t  o |   o|     |   o|     |H  o| e
           |             | l|   n |   n|     |   n|     |i  n| n
           |             | a|   e |   e|     |   e|     |t  e| t
           |             | y|   n |   n|     |   n|     |s  n| a
           |             | e|   t |   t|Ave. |   t|Ave. |   t| g
           |             | d|   s |   s|per  |   s|per  |   s| e
NAME.      |CLUB.        | .|   . |    |Game.|   .|Game.|   .| .
-----------+-------------+--+-----+----+-----+----+-----+----+----
Buffinton  |Philadelphia |44|1492 | 134|3.04 |  72| 1.63| 321|.215
Baldwin    |Chicago      |28| 960 | 125|4.46 |  65| 2.32| 233|.242
Burdick    |Indianapolis |20| 700 |  88|4.40 |  52| 2.60| 167|.238
Boyle      |   "    "    |37|1294 | 181|4.89 |  90| 2.43| 317|.245
Conway     |Detroit      |44|1508 | 168|3.82 |  84| 1.81| 315|.208
Clarkson   |Boston       |53|1885 | 239|4.51 | 120| 2.26| 436|.231
Casey      |Philadelphia |32|1141 | 153|4.78 |  86| 2.69| 296|.259
Getzein    |Detroit      |45|1626 | 224|4.98 | 137| 3.04| 402|.247
Gleason    |Philadelphia |23| 791 | 106|4.61 |  57| 2.48| 200|.252
Galvin     |Pittsburg    |50|1760 | 193|3.86 | 123| 2.46| 437|.248
Gruber     |Detroit      |27| 934 | 124|4.59 |  57| 2.11| 199|.213
Healy      |Indianapolis |37|1326 | 204|5.51 | 128| 3.46| 357|.269
Krock      |Chicago      |39|1294 | 143|3.66 |  74| 1.89| 293|.226
Keefe      |New York     |50|1643 | 149|2.99 |  75| 1.50| 329|.200
Madden     |Boston       |19| 648 |  84|4.42 |  53| 2.79| 154|.237
Morris     |Pittsburg    |54|1911 | 213|3 94 | 114| 2.11| 459|.240
O'Day      |Washington   |46|1545 | 215|4.67 | 108| 2.34| 374|.242
Radbourne  |Boston       |24| 791 | 110|4.58 |  67| 2.79| 192|.242
Shreve     |Indianapolis |35|1235 | 210|6.00 | 134| 3.82| 356|.2*8
Sowders    |Boston       |35|1219 | 155|4.43 |  69| 1.97| 283|.232
Staley     |Pittsburg    |24| 774 | 103|4.29 |  58| 2.41| 186|.240
Sanders    |Philadelphia |31|1097 | 113|3.64 |  57| 1.84| 247|.225
Titcomb    |New York     |23| 756 |  97|4.21 |  41| 1.78| 159|.210
Van Haltren|Chicago      |27| 967 | 160|5.92 |  81| 3 00| 264|.273
Welch      |New York     |47|1592 | 156|3.32 |  80| 1.70| 330|.207
Whitney    |Washington   |39|1309 | 181|4.64 |  94| 2.41| 317|.242


           |            |  | T | F|  |B      |   |P
           |            | N| i | i|  |a      |   |e
           |            | u| m | e|  |s  o   | T |r
           |            | m| e | l| W|e  p  c| o |c
           |            | b| s | d| i|s  p  a| t |e
           |            | e|   | i| l|   o  l| a |n
           |            | r| A | n| d|g  n  l| l |t
           |            |  | s | g|  |i  e  e|   |a  A
           |            | P| s |  | P|v  n  d| C |g  c
           |            | u| i | E| i|e  t   | h |e  c
           |            | t| s | r| t|n  s  b| a |   e
           |            |  | t | r| c|      a| n |   p
           |            | O| i | o| h|   o  l| c |   t
           |            | u| n | r| e|   n  l| e |   e
           |            | t| g | s| s|      s| s |   d
NAME       |CLUB        | .| . | .| .|      .| . |   .
-----------+------------+--+---+--+--+-------+---+-----
Buffinton  |Philadelphia|31|322|10|12|    62 |437| .808
Baldwin    |Chicago     |11|208| 5|18|    99 |341| .642
Burdick    |Indianapolis|14| 87| 5|14|    44 |164| .616
Boyle      |   "    "   |14|180| 7|20|    59 |280| .692
Conway     |Detroit     |10|267| 7|12|    57 |353| .784
Clarkson   |Boston      |24|351|22|37|   119 |553| .678
Casey      |Philadelphia|15|176| 9|15|    48 |263| .726
Getzein    |Detroit     |29|276|16|24|    52 |397| .768
Gleason    |Philadelphia| 6|128|13|14|    53 |214| .626
Galvin     |Pittsburg   |23|224|10|11|    58 |326| .758
Gruber     |Detroit     | 4|121| 8|14|    42 |189| .661
Healy      |Indianapolis| 5|206|15|22|    81 |329| .641
Krock      |Chicago     | 4|217|12|18|    45 |296| .746
Keefe      |New York    |29|410|17|24|    86 |566| .775
Madden     |Boston      | 4| 95| 4| 8|    28 |139| .712
Morris     |Pittsburg   |20|240| 8|17|    70 |355| .732
O'Day      |Washington  |19|252| 7|23|   123 |424| .639
Radbourne  |Boston      |14|104| 6| 9|    44 |177| .666
Shreve     |Indianapolis| 7|173|16|31|    94 |321| .560
Sowders    |Boston      |23|192| 8|16|    71 |310| .693
Staley     |Pittsburg   | 8|127| 5| 8|    52 |200| .675
Sanders    |Philadelphia|17|194| 7|10|    34 |262| .805
Titcomb    |New York    | 1|157| 8| 9|    48 |223| .708
Van Haltren|Chicago     |25|181| 5|24|    53 |288| .715
Welch      |New York    |16|248|17|20|   113 |414| .637
Whitney    |Washington  |24|145|11|10|    60 |250| .676


BATTING AND FIELDING RECORD

Of Clubs, Members of the National League of Professional B. B. Clubs.

       *       *       *       *       *

SEASON OF 1888.

[**Proofreaders note: Table split into three parts to fit on page]

R |            |      |     ||BATTING
a |            |      |     ||Times|      |Ave.|      |Ave.
n |            |Games |Games||at   |Runs  |per |Runs  |per
k |CLUB        |Played|Won  ||Bat  |Scored|Game|Earned|Game
--+------------+------+-----++-----+------+----+------+-----
 1|New York    |  137 |  84 || 4751|  659 |4.81|  334 | 2.44
 2|Chicago     |  135 |  77 || 4616|  734 |5.43|  441 | 3.26
  |            |      |  [1]||     |      |    |      |
 3|Philadelphia|  130 |  69 || 4496|  535 |4.11|  272 | 2.09
 4|Boston      |  137 |  70 || 4835|  669 |4.88|  355 | 2.59
 5|Detroit     |  134 |  68 || 4859|  721 |5.38|  423 | 3.15
 6|Indianapolis|  137 |  66 || 4678|  531 |3.87|  308 | 2.27
  |            |      |  [2]||     |      |    |      |
 7|Pittsburg   |  136 |  50 || 4626|  600 |4.41|  269 | 1.97
 8|Washington  |  136 |  48 || 4548|  482 |3.54|  225 | 1.65

[Footnote 1: 1 game forfeited to Philadelphia]
[Footnote 2: 1 game forfeited to New York]

            |BATTING
            |First|       |     |Ave.  |      |Ave.
            |Base |Per-   |Total| per  |Bases |per
CLUB        |Hits |centage|Bases| Game |Stolen|Game
------------+-----+-------+-----+------+------+------
New York    |1150 |  .242 |1581 |11.54 |  314 | 2.29
Chicago     |1202 |  .260 |1753 |12.98 |  292 | 2.16
Philadelphia|1017 |  .226 |1298 | 9.98 |  246 | 1.89
Boston      |1180 |  .244 |1673 |12.21 |  292 | 2.13
Detroit     |1268 |  .261 |1724 |12.86 |  192 | 1.43
Indianapolis|1061 |  .226 |1359 | 9.92 |  287 | 2.09
Pittsburg   |1112 |  .240 |1443 |10.61 |  351 | 2.58
Washington  | 944 |  .207 |1233 | 9.06 |  336 | 2.47



            |FIELDING
            |      | T    | F   |       |         |       |P
            |      | i    | i   |       |         |       |e
            |      | m    | e   |       |         |       |r
            |      | e  A | l   |       |         |       |c A
            |      | s  s | d   |       |         |       |e c
            |      |    s | i   |       |         |       |n c
            |      |    i | n  E|       |         |       |t e
            |      |    s | g  r|Passed |Bases    |       |a p
            |      |    t |    r|Balls  |given    |       |g t
            |Number|    i |    o|and    |Opponents|       |e e
            | Put  |    n |    r|Wild   |on Called|Total  |  d
CLUB        |  Out |    g |    s|Pitches|Balls    |Chances|
------------+------+------+-----+-------+---------+-------+-----
New York    | 3633 | 2349 | 432 |   205 |     302 |  6921 |.864
Chicago     | 3549 | 2305 | 409 |   200 |     289 |  6752 |.867
Philadelphia| 3469 | 2189 | 429 |   144 |     200 |  6431 |.879
Boston      | 3652 | 2288 | 520 |   162 |     270 |  6892 |.861
Detroit     | 3579 | 2172 | 474 |   128 |     181 |  6534 |.880
Indianapolis| 3581 | 2048 | 408 |   159 |     225 |  6421 |.876
Pittsburg   | 3545 | 2097 | 453 |   189 |     296 |  6580 |.857
Washington  | 3497 | 2062 | 522 |   173 |     313 |  6567 |.846


TIE GAMES.--New York 7, Chicago 1, Philadelphia 1, Boston 3, Detroit 3,
Pittsbnrg 4, Indianapolis 1, Washington 2.

THE VETERANS OF THE LEAGUE.

Those of the players who have taken part in League contests for not less
than ten years are entitled to the honor of belonging to the ranks of the
veterans of the League, and they include the following representative
players, the majority of whom are now in League Clubs:

                 |Number |Number |       |      |
                 |of     |of     |       |First |
                 |Seasons|Games  |Times  | Base | Perc-
Name.            |played.|played.|at bat.| hits.| entage
-----------------+-------+-------+-------+------+-------
Adrian C. Anson  |    13 |  1173 |  4904 | 1751 | .357
James O'Rourke   |    13 |  1133 |  4832 | 1519 | .314
James L. White   |    13 |  1101 |  4610 | 1439 | .312
Paul Hines       |    13 |  1184 |  5112 | 1591 | .311
E. B. Sutton     |    13 |  1007 |  4196 | 1216 | .289
John F. Morrill  |    13 |  1194 |  4685 | 1253 | .267
John J. Burdock  |    13 |   871 |  3584 |  911 | .254
M. J. Kelly      |    11 |  1080 |  4370 | 1421 | .325
A. Dalrymple     |    11 |   909 |  4041 | 1198 | .296
Joseph Start     |    11 |   776 |  3366 |  995 | .295
E. N. Williamson |    11 |  1071 |  4163 | 1133 | .274
Geo. F. Gore     |    10 |   886 |  3689 | 1157 | .313
Hardy Richardson |    10 |   910 |  3974 | 1230 | .309
John W. Glasscock|    10 |   952 |  3847 | 1089 | .283
Chas. W. Bennett |    10 |   709 |  2720 |  761 | .279
Joseph Hornung   |    10 |   858 |  3706 |  988 | .266
F. S. Flint      |    10 |   708 |  2759 |  669 | .242
Jas. McCormick   |    10 |   499 |  1957 |  464 | .237
D. W. Force      |    10 |   746 |  2873 |  598 | .208

Of these Sutton, Dalrymple, Burdock, and Force are in the service of
minor League Clubs, while the retired players include Start and McCormick.

Those who have played for less than ten years and not less than seven
include the following second class of veterans, the first class being
limited to players who have a credit of a decade of service:

                 |Number |Number |       |      |
                 |of     |of     |       |First |
                 |Seasons|Games  |Times  | Base | Perc-
Name.            |played.|played.|at bat.| hits.| entage
-----------------+-------+-------+-------+------+-------
Dennis Brouthers |     9 |   845 |  3578 | 1267 | .354
Rodger Connor    |     9 |   943 |  3870 | 1309 | .338
J. C. Howe       |     9 |   827 |  3548 | 1067 | .300
Geo. A. Wood     |     9 |   854 |  3677 | 1024 | .278
M. C. Dorgan     |     9 |   660 |  2719 |  756 | .277
Thomas Burns     |     9 |   900 |  3597 |  990 | .275
Edwin Hanlon     |     9 |   893 |  3629 |  972 | .267
Jno. M. Ward     |     9 |  1046 |  4403 | 1169 | .265
A. A. Irwin      |     9 |   796 |  3136 |  796 | .254
Jno. Farrell     |     9 |   729 |  3048 |  776 | .254
M. Welch         |     9 |   491 |  1817 |  433 | .238
B. Gilligan      |     9 |   510 |  1848 |  380 | .209
Jos. F. Galvin   |     9 |   524 |  2000 |  418 | .208
Wm. Ewing        |     8 |   640 |  2708 |  812 | .299
Fred Dunlap      |     8 |   707 |  2972 |  867 | .292
P. Gillespie     |     8 |   703 |  2907 |  817 | .278
Thomas York      |     8 |   566 |  2291 |  617 | .269
Robert Ferguson  |     8 |   538 |  2209 |  596 | .269
Jas. E. Whitney  |     8 |   525 |  2085 |  555 | .266
Jeremiah Denny   |     8 |   824 |  3308 |  881 | .266
Chas. Radbourn   |     8 |   530 |  2092 |  517 | .247
George Shaffer   |     7 |   521 |  2137 |  602 | .281
Sam W. Wise      |     7 |   698 |  2826 |  785 | .277
Jno. E. Clapp    |     7 |   398 |  1688 |  465 | .275
W. A. Purcell    |     7 |   500 |  2136 |  559 | .261
J P. Cassidy     |     7 |   416 |  1718 |  433 | .252
J. J. Gerhardt   |     7 |   565 |  2182 |  489 | .224
Geo. E. Weidman  |     7 |   338 |  1273 |  22* | .1*4
                 |       |       |       |  [A] |  [A]
[**Proofreaders note A: * Indecipherable number**]

Of the above Gillespie, Dorgan, Clapp, York, Ferguson and Cassidy have
retired from field service.

One of the most interesting records of the games played in the
professional arena during the past eighteen years of the existence, first
of the old National Association from 1871 to 1875 inclusive, and then of
the National League from 1876 to 1888 inclusive, is that of the contests
each year between the rival Boston and Chicago  clubs, the former winning
the pennant in 1872, '73, '74, '75, '77 and '78, and also in 1883; while
Chicago won it in 1876 and in 1880, '81, '82, '85 and '86. As a matter for
interesting reference,  we give below the full record of victories and
defeats scored by the two clubs from 1871 to 1888 inclusive. The Chicago
Club did not play in 1872 and 1873, having been burned out in the great
fire of '71.

       |1871 |1872 |1873 |1874 |1875 |1876 |1877 |1878 |1879
-------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----
       |W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.
-------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--
Boston |22|10|39| 8|43|16|52|18|71| 8|39|31|31|17|41|19|49|20
Chicago|20| 9| -| -| -| -|27|31|30|37|52|14|18|30|30|30|44|32


       |1880|1881|1882|1883|1884|1885|1886|1887|1888
-------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----
       |W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.
-------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--
Boston |40|44|38|45|45|39|63|35|73|38|46|66|56|61|61|60|70|64
Chicago|67|17|56|28|55|29|59|39|62|50|87|25|90|31|71|50|77|58

THE LEAGUE'S PRESIDENT.

The close of the League campaign of 1888 saw the President of the League,
Mr. N. E. Young, enter upon a new era in the history of his official
duties, first as Secretary, then as President-Secretary, two positions he
has so faithfully and efficiently filled since the organization of the
League. Mr. Young was prominent in organizing the first professional
National Association; and but for him Mr. Chadwick would not have been
able to have carried out his project of dividing the baseball fraternity
into the two officially recognized classes which he did when he started
the first professional Association in 1871. From that year to 1875
inclusive, Mr. Young acted as Secretary of the old National Association,
and when it was superseded by the National League in 1876 he was elected
Secretary of the new organization, Mr. Bulkely, the present Governor of
Connecticut, being the League's first President. Mr. Young was also
Secretary under the Presidency of Mr. A. G. Mills, and when that gentleman
resigned, the worthy Secretary was elected to the joint offices of
President, Secretary and Treasurer of the League, and this position he has
most capably filled ever since.

A Washington journalist has this well-merited compliment to say of the
veteran:

"The rugged honesty of the League president is a matter with which those
interested in base ball have long been familiar. His residence is in
Washington, and he was for years a player and umpire, having all the ups
and downs usual to their lot, but he is now in very comfortable
circumstances. The duties of his office require a cool-headed man, able to
do justice to all without fear or favor. It is singularly trying at times,
but though the intense rivalry of the different clubs sometimes causes the
managers to lose their heads and charge unfairness against the umpires,
not a word has ever been said that would in any way compromise Nick Young.
It is an honor and credit to the baseball magnates that they have such a
man at the head of the League."

THE JOINT RULES COMMITTEE AND THEIR WORK.

[Illustration: N.E. Young.]

The work accomplished by the Joint Rules Committee of the National League
and the American Association at their meeting in New York in November,
1888, ranks with the best on record in the revision of the playing rules
of the game, and the successful results achieved in improving the code was
largely due to the marked efficiency evinced by the chairman of the
Committee, Mr. Chas. H. Byrne, the president of the Brooklyn club, who was
indefatigable in doing the large amount of revisory work which was thrown
upon the committee. In the face of a very noisy and sensational demand for
radical changes in the rules governing the game, the committee, as a
whole, manifested a wise conservatism in several respects, which cannot
help but be of material assistance in advancing the welfare of the game at
large. In the first place, by reducing the powers of the attack nearer to
an equality with those of the defence--which result was accomplished when
they reduced the number of called balls from five to four--they not only
adopted a rule which will moderate the dangerous speed in delivering the
ball to the bat, but they thereby afforded the batsman an additional
chance for more effective work at the bat. This latter point, too, has
been aided by reducing the number of outs the batsman has hitherto been
unfairly subjected to. The rule which puts batsmen out on catches of foul
balls, which, since the game originated, has been an unfair rule of play,
has seen its best day; and this year the entering wedge to its ultimate
disappearance has been driven in, with the practical result of the repeal
of the foul tip catch. This improvement, too, is in the line of aiding the
batting side, as it gets rid of one of the numerous ways of putting the
batsman out.

The argument brought to bear in favor of the elimination of outs from
foul balls from the code was in the main as follows:

When the batsman hits a fair ball, while at the same time that he gives
the fielders a chance to put him out, he himself is also given an equal
chance of making a base or of scoring a run; but when he hits a foul ball,
while he affords the fielders an opportunity to catch him out, no such
compensating advantage is given him in the way of earning a base or a run
as in the case of a fair hit ball; and it is in this that the working of
the foul ball rule becomes so palpably unjust. It is sufficient punishment
for hitting a foul ball that he, as batsman, be deprived of making a base,
without adding the unjust penalty of an out. This one sided condition of
things, too, is increased when a double play is made on the catch of a
foul ball, for not only is the batsman unfairly punished, but also the
base runner who may have made the base by a clean hit.

It is this latter unfair rule which the committee repealed in getting rid
of the foul fly tip; and now a batsman who has earned his base by a safe
hit and who runs to the next base on a foul fly tip ball caught by the
catcher, can no longer be put out on the double play, as he is now allowed
to return to the base he left on the hit, as in the case of a foul ball
not caught.

Another step in advance was made by the committee when they officially
recognized a sacrifice hit as a factor in team work at the bat. Hitherto
far too great stress has been laid upon the alleged skill of the batsman
in making extra hits--two and three baggers and home runs--at the cost of
giving due credit to the batting which forwards base runners and sends in
runs. The work of the slugging batsman who, nearly every time he goes to
the bat when no one is on the bases, makes an extra hit, does not compare
with that of the team worker who either by a single base hit or a
sacrifice hit forwards a runner round the bases, or sends a run in. Here
is where the batting averages prove to be complete failures so far as
affording a criterion of a batsman's value in team work is concerned;
which work, by the way, is neither more nor less than that of forwarding
base runners or sending runs in by batting--for one batsman may make four
extra base hits in a game without forwarding a runner or sending in a run
in a single instance, while another batsman may make but one safe hit and
three sacrifice hits, and yet either forward as many runners or send in as
many runs.

Probably the best piece of work done by the committee was the amendment
they made to the rules governing the umpire, wherein, in defining the
powers of an umpire to impose a fine of not less than $5 nor more than $25
for abusive, threatening or improper language to the umpire, an amendment
was made as follows:

"A repetition of the offence shall subject such player to a removal from
the game, and the immediate substitution of another player then in
uniform."

Lastly, the rule admitting of an extra substitute being allowed to play
in the game, at the option of the captain of either of the contesting
teams, though an experiment, gives promise of being a desirable amendment.
The classifying of the code of rules so as to facilitate the finding of
any special rule during the hurry of a contest in progress, was also a
desirable improvement. Take it altogether, the present committee did
excellent work at their Fall meeting of 1888.

OVERRUNNING THE BASES.

Twenty odd years ago George Wright suggested to the Chairman of the old
National Association's Committee of Rules that it would be a good plan to
allow base runners to overrun first base, giving them the privilege to
return and touch the base again without being put out, before attempting
to make another base. The suggestion was adopted, and the rule went into
effect in 1870, and it has been in operation ever since. When the
amendment was presented at the convention of 1869, a delegate wanted the
rule applied to all bases, but the majority preferred to test the
experiment as proposed at first base. The rule of extending the
over-running to all the bases was advocated at the last meeting in
1888 of the Joint Committee of Rules, but it was not adopted. The rule
is worthy of consideration, in view of the constant sprains and
injuries of one kind and another arising from sliding to bases. There has
not been a single instance of an injury occurring from the working of the
rule of overrunning first base since the rule was adopted, while serious
injuries are of daily occurrence in match games, arising from collisions at
other bases than first, and these are due entirely to the absence of the
overrunning rule. The most irritating disputes caused by questions involved
in sliding to bases and in running up against base players, are also due to
the same cause. Why not put a stop to these injuries and these disputes by
giving the base runner the same privileges in overrunning second, third and
home bases that he now has in overrunning first base? In every way will the
adoption of the rule suggested be an improvement, and not the least of its
advantages will be its gain to base running, which is, next to fielding,
the most attractive feature of our game.

THE PATRONS OF BALL GROUNDS.

There are two classes of the patrons of professional baseball grounds
which club Presidents and Directors have their choice in catering to for
each season, and these are, first, the reputable class, who prefer to see
the game played scientifically and by gentlemanly exemplars of the
beauties of the game; and second, the hoodlum element, who revel in noisy
coaching, "dirty ball playing," kicking against the umpires, and exciting
disputes and rows in every inning. The Chicago, Philadelphia and Boston
Clubs in the League have laid out nearly $200,000 within the past two
years in constructing their grounds for the express purpose of eliciting
the very best patronage of their respective cities. The Brooklyn Club have
excelled in this respect in the American Association by constructing their
grounds for a similar class of patrons. But all of the clubs have not
followed this example, the majority committing the blunder of considering
only the tastes and requirements of the hoodlum class apparently in
catering for patronage. This is a great financial mistake. Experience has
shown conclusively that it pays best to cater solely for the best class of
patronage. The work in doing this is so much more satisfactory for one
thing, and it is sure to be the most remunerative. If there is any sport
which yields a fair equivalent in the special attractions it presents for
an admission fee of half a dollar, it is such ball playing as was
exhibited during the past season on the grounds of the leading clubs of
the National League. A feature of the attendance at the League games of
1888 was the presence of the fair sex in such goodly numbers. Where the
ladies congregate as spectators of sports a refining influence is brought
to bear which is valuable to the welfare of the game. Besides which, the
patronage of ladies improves the character of the assemblages and helps to
preserve the order without which first-class patronage cannot be obtained.

THE VALUE OF TEAM WORK.

Nothing has been more gratifying to the admirers of the game in the
practical experience of improved points of play realized during the season
of 1888, than the growing appreciation, by the most intelligent patrons of
the game, of the value of team work at the bat, and its great superiority
as an element of success in winning pennants, to the old school plan of
record batting as shown in the efforts to excel solely in home run hitting
and the slugging style of batting.

So intent have been the general class of batsmen on making big batting
averages that the science of batting and the advantages to be derived from
"playing for the side of the bat" have been entirely lost sight of until
within the past year. Now, however, the best judges of play in the game
have begun to "tumble to" the benefits and to the attractions of team work
at the bat, as illustrated by skillful sacrifice hits, batting to help
base-runners around and to bring runs in, and not that of going to the bat
with the sole idea of trying to "hit the ball out of the lot," or "knock
the stuffing out of it," in the effort to get in the coveted home run.
with its costly expenditure of physical strength in the 120 yards spurt in
running which it involves.

There is one thing the season's experience has shown, and that is that
field captains of intelligence and judgment, like Anson, Comiskey, Ward,
Irwin, et al. have come to realize the fact that team batting is a very
important element in bringing about pennant winning, and by team batting
is meant the rule which makes everything secondary in the work of the
batsman to the important point to forward men around the bases and to
bring runs in. The batsman who excels in the essentials of the art of
batting is the true leader, though he may not make a three-bagger or a
home run more than half a dozen times in a season's batting. And a part of
team work at the bat is sacrifice hitting--sacrifice hits being hits
which, while they result in the striker's retirement, nevertheless either
forward runners to the bases or bring runs in. After a batsman has become
a base-runner, whether by a hit, a fielding error, or a battery error, if
he be forwarded to second by a safe bunt or a neat tap of the ball, both
being base hits; or by a sacrifice hit, the batsman is equally entitled to
credit if he forward a runner by such hit.

In regard to the slugging tactics which the batsman goes in for extra
hits at all costs, it may partly be regarded as a very stupid piece of
play at the bat to endeavor to make a home run when there is no one on the
bases to benefit by it, and for the reason that it subjects the batsman to
a violent sprinting of 120 yards, and professional sprint-runners who
enter for runs of that distance, even when in training for the effort,
require a half-hour's good rest before making another such effort. And yet
there are batsmen who strive to make hits which necessitate a 120 yards
run two or three times in a single game. Do field captains who go in for
this sluggish style of batting ever think of the wear and tear of a
player's physical strength in this slugging business?

EVILS IN THE PROFESSIONAL ARENA.

The two great obstacles in the way of the success of the majority of
professional ball players are wine and women. The saloon and the brothel
are the evils of the baseball world at the present day; and we see it
practically exemplified in the failure of noted players to play up to the
standard they are capable of were they to avoid these gross evils. One day
it is a noted pitcher who fails to serve his club at a critical period of
the campaign. Anon, it is the disgraceful escapade of an equally noted
umpire. And so it goes from one season to another, at the cost of the loss
of thousands of dollars to clubs who blindly shut their eyes to the costly
nature of intemperance and dissipation in their ranks. We tell you,
gentlemen of the League and Association, the sooner you introduce the
prohibition plank in your contracts the sooner you will get rid of the
costly evil of drunkenness and dissipation among your players. Club after
club have lost championship honors time and again by this evil, and yet
they blindly condone these offences season after season. The prohibition
rule from April to October is the only practical rule for removing
drunkenness in your teams.

PRIVATE SIGNALS IN COACHING.

The coaching of base runners by private signals is an improvement in the
game which is bound to come into vogue eventually. The noisy method of
coaching which disgraced most of the American Association club teams in
1888 is doomed to die out. In the case of the coaching of deaf mutes, like
Hoy and others, private signals had to be employed, and it can readily be
seen how effective these can be made to be when properly systematized.
There is not a single point in noisy verbal coaching which aids
base-runners. In fact, in five cases out of six, it is a detriment to
the runner. The fact is, the whole object of rowdy coaching is to annoy
and confuse the battery players and not to help base-running. The way to
rattle both the catcher and pitcher with the best effect, and to do it
legitimately, is by private coaching. In this way a pitcher is more likely
to get bothered in his endeavors to interpret the private signals than by
the noisiest of verbal coaching.

 [Illustration: Brooklyn Grounds.]

THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION.

THE CHAMPIONSHIP CAMPAIGN OF 1888.

The championship campaign of the American Association in 1888 proved to
be exceptionally interesting in one respect, and that was in the close
contest for the lead between the St. Louis, Brooklyn, Athletic and
Cincinnati Clubs. Another feature was the fact that the best managed and
most ably captained team of the eight clubs deservedly bore off the
championship honors of the season; and that, too, against the strong team
of picked star players which the Brooklyn Club gathered together at such
cost to oppose the champions. The season was also made specially
noteworthy by the fact that the St. Louis Club came in victors in the race
for the fourth consecutive season, a record no other club except the
Boston has ever been able to equal, and in the case of the Boston Club it
was done before the organization of the National League. The pennant race
was commenced on April 18, on which date the Louisville team began play at
St. Louis, and the Cincinnatis at Kansas City in the West; while the
Cleveland team opened at Brooklyn, and the Baltimore at Philadelphia in
the East, the victors being the St. Louis, Cincinnati, Brooklyn, and
Baltimore teams. By the end of April the Cincinnati and Athletic teams led
in the West and East, with St. Louis and Brooklyn occupying fourth and
fifth positions respectively, in the race. Before the end of May, while
Cincinnati stood in the van, St. Louis had pulled up to second place, and
Brooklyn had secured third position, the Athletics being fourth. In June
Cincinnati fell off and St. Louis went to the front, with Brooklyn a close
second, and the Athletics third. In July, Cincinnati rallied well and
pushed the Athletics down to fourth place, while St. Louis and Brooklyn
still occupied the leading positions. It was during the week ending July
15 that Brooklyn held first place with a percentage of .676 to
St. Louis .639; before the month ended, however, St. Louis pulled up
to .662, while Brooklyn stood at .641.

August proved to be a fatal month for Brooklyn, they only winning 8 games
out of 22 won and lost this month, the result of their tumble being their
retirement to fourth place, Cincinnati rallying well this month, while St.
Louis began to look sure for the pennant, the Athletics ending the month a
good third in the race. In September the Athletics pressed the Cincinnatis
hard, and drove them out of second place, and before the month ended it
was made evident that the closing part of the campaign would see a hot
fight for the second position in the race between the Athletic and
Brooklyn teams, September seeing the St. Louis team a fixture for first
place, while Cincinnati was kept back in fourth position. By the close of
September, St. Louis held first with a percentage of .691; the Athletics
were second, with .615; Brooklyn third with .606, and Cincinnati fourth
with .574. October saw a close struggle between the Athletic and Brooklyn
teams for second place, and had the former team been kept temperate they
would have finished second; but they "boozed" too much in October, and
this gave Brooklyn the chance to take the position from them, and when the
campaign ended on the 17th of October the record left the eight clubs
occupying the following relative positions:

          | Won. | Lost. | Per Ct.
----------+------+-------+-------
St. Louis |   92 |    43 | .681
Brooklyn  |   88 |    52 | .629
Athletic  |   81 |    52 | .609
Cincinnati|   80 |    54 | .597
Baltimore |   57 |    80 | .416
Cleveland |   50 |    82 | .378
Louisville|   48 |    87 | .355
Kans. City|   43 |    89 | .326

In the above record the Athletic Club is credited with one victory and
Baltimore with one defeat less than they were given credit for in the
records published at the close of the season. The game was taken out of
the record by the following order of President Wikoff:

                                            NEW YORK, October 16.
  W.S. KAMES, Esq, Secretary Athletic Base Ball Club, Philadelphia:

  _Dear Sir:_--I find on examination that the Baltimore Athletic game of
  June 10, 1888, played at Gloucester, N.J., and won by your club, and
which
  has been counted in the regular championship series as a postponed game
of
  April 21, was irregular, for the reason that the said postponed game of
  April 21 was played off by your club in Philadelphia as per authority of
  my official circular No. 36, on May 16, 1888. Therefore, the game won by
  the Athletic Club on June 10 cannot be counted in the regular
championship
  series.     Yours truly,
                                 WHEELER C. WIKOFF, Secy.


It will be seen that the St. Louis Club won the championship, and for the
fourth consecutive time, thus breaking the record. The Brooklyns, by a
liberal expenditure of money toward the close of the season, succeeded in
strengthening sufficiently to head off the Athletics for second place, and
the latter had to be content with third position. The Cincinnatis did good
work toward the close, despite the sale of several valuable players, and
almost succeeded in closing the gap between fourth and third places; as it
was, they ended a close fourth. Baltimore secured fifth place by a goodly
margin over the sixth club, Cleveland. Louisville finished  seventh, the
lowest position the club ever occupied. Kansas City, though the
tail-ender, nevertheless made an excellent first-season  record. Neither
the St. Louis nor Brooklyn Clubs lost a series. They split even with ten
victories each in their games, and Brooklyn stood alone in winning the
series from every other club. The Brooklyn Club alone played its full
schedule of 140 games.

The following is a full and complete summary of the work done by the
eight clubs in the championship arena during 1888:


                       |    |    |    |    |    |    |    |  K
                       |    |    |    |  C |    |    |  L |  a
                       |  S |    |    |  I |  B |  C |  o |  n
                       |  t |  B |  A |  n |  a |  l |  u |  s
                       |  . |  r |  t |  c |  l |  e |  i |  a
                       |    |  o |  h |  i |  t |  v |  s |  s
                       |  L |  o |  l |  n |  i |  e |  v |
                       |  o |  k |  e |  n |  m |  l |  i |  C
                       |  u |  l |  t |  a |  o |  a |  l |  i
                       |  i |  y |  i |  t |  r |  n |  l |  t
                       |  s |  n |  c |  i |  e |  d |  e |  y
                       |  . |  . |  . |  . |  . |  . |  . |  .
-----------------------+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----
Victories              |  92|  88|  81|  80|  57|  50|  48|  43
Defeats                |  43|  52|  52|  54|  80|  82|  87|  89
Drawn Games            |   2|   3|   3|   3|   0|   3|   4|   0
Total Played           | 137| 143| 136| 137| 137| 135| 139| 132
Per Cent. of Victories |.681|.629|.609|.597|.416|.378|.355|.326
Series Won             |   4|   6|   4|   3|   2|   0|   1|   0
Series Lost            |   0|   0|   1|   1|   4|   3|   5|   6
Series Tied            |   1|   1|   1|   1|   0|   0|   0|   0
Series Unfinished      |   2|   0|   1|   2|   1|   4|   1|   1
"Chicago" Victories    |  12|   9|  13|   9|   3|   5|   6|   4
"Chicago" Defeats      |   4|   9|   5|   7|   8|  12|   6|  10
Home Victories         |  60|  52|  51|  56|  30|  32|  26|  25
Home Defeats           |  21|  20|  20|  24|  26|  27|  29|  33
Victories Abroad       |  29|  36|  30|  24|  27|  18|  22|  18
Defeats Abroad         |  22|  32|  32|  50|  31|  23|  58|  56
Extra Innings Victories|   3|   7|   5|   8|   3|   1|   2|   1
Extra Innings Defeats  |   6|   3|   7|   4|   3|   1|   5|   2
Extra Innings Drawn    |   2|   2|   2|   2|   0|   1|   1|   0
Single Figure Victories|  73|  74|  57|  56|  48|  37|  37|  32
Single Figure Defeats  |  38|  46|  46|  44|  59|  58|  62|  65
Double Figure Victories|  19|  14|  24|  24|   9|  13|  11|  11
Double Figure Defeats  |   5|   6|   6|  10|  21|  24|  25|  24
Batting Average        |.250|.243|.263|.240|.231|.235|.248|.221
Fielding Average       |.930|.924|.934|.940|.928|.941|.913|.921
Highest Score in a Game|  18|  18|  28|  18|  12|  23|  18|  26
Worst Defeat           | 5-0| 7-0| 8-0|12-0|14-0|15-0| 9-0|14-0
Won by One Run         |  15|  20|  11|  19|  16|  14|  11|  16
Lost by One Run        |  18|  15|  15|  14|  10|  19|  10|  15
Total Runs Scored      | 790| 757| 828| 734| 653| 641|.678| 578
Total Stolen Bases     | 526| 413| 568| 464| 374| 399| 368| 266


THE CHAMPION CLUB TEAM OF 1888.

There were fourteen players of the St. Louis team who took part in forty
games and over, the first nine being as follows:

King, pitcher, 65 games; Boyle, catcher, 71 games; Comiskey, first
baseman, 137 games; Robinson, second baseman, 134 games; Latham, third
baseman, 133 games; White, shortstop, 109 games; O'Neill, left field, 130
games; Lyons, center field, 123 games; and McCarthy, right field, 131
games. The other battery players were Hudson, pitcher, 55 games; Milligan,
catcher, 63 games; Chamberlain, pitcher, 40 games; Herr, shortstop, 43
games, and McGarr, second base, 35 games. The other players are not named
in the official averages. The first nine who played in one hundred games
and over, and who led in batting averages, were O'Neill, McCarthy,
Comiskey, Latham, Robinson, White, and Lyons; Hudson, Milligan, Boyle,
King and Chamberlain, all of whom played in less than one hundred games,
following in order.

In fielding averages, Comiskey, Milligan, O'Neill, Boyle, McCarthy,
Lyons, Robinson and Latham.

The feature of the work of the team in winning the pennant was the
ability shown by Captain Comiskey in his position; the fine infield work,
too, of Latham and Robinson, and the outfielding of O'Neill and McCarthy
greatly aiding the batteries of the team. The full summary of the team's
work is given below:

                       |    |    |    |    |    |    |  K ||
                       |    |    |  C |    |    |  L |  a ||
                       |    |    |  i |  B |  C |  o |  n ||
                       |  B |  A |  n |  a |  l |  u |  s ||
                       |  r |  t |  c |  l |  e |  i |  a ||
                       |  o |  h |  i |  t |  v |  s |  s || T
                       |  l |  l |  n |  i |  e |  v |    || o
                       |  k |  e |  n |  m |  l |  i |  C || t
                       |  l |  t |  a |  o |  a |  l |  I || a
                       |  y |  i |  t |  r |  n |  l |  t || l
                       |  n |  c |  i |  e |  d |  e |  y || s
                       |  . |  . |  . |  . |  . |  . |  . || .
-----------------------+----+----+----+----+----+----+----++---
Victories              |  10|  10|  10|  14|  16|  16|  16|| 92
Defeats                |  10|   7|   8|   6|   4|   4|   4|| 43
Drawn Games            |   1|   1|   0|   0|   0|   0|   0||  2
Series Won             |   0|   0|   0|   1|   1|   1|   1||  4
Series Tied            |   1|   0|   0|   0|   0|   0|   0||  1
Series Unfinished      |   0|   1|   1|   0|   0|   0|   0||  2
"Chicago" Victories    |   3|   2|   0|   2|   4|   1|   0|| 12
"Chicago" Defeats      |   1|   1|   1|   0|   1|   0|   0||  4
Single Figure Victories|   9|  10|   8|  11|  13|  10|  14|| 75
Single Figure Defeats  |   9|   5|   7|   6|   4|   3|   4|| 38
Double Figure Victories|   1|   0|   2|   3|   4|   6|   2|| 18
Double Figure Defeats  |   1|   2|   1|   0|   0|   1|   0||  5
Extra Innings Games    |   2|   2|   0|   1|   0|   0|   0||  5
Victories at Home      |   6|   6|   6|   8|   9|  11|  14|| 60
Defeats at Home        |   4|   3|   4|   3|   1|   2|   3|| 21
Victories Abroad       |   4|   4|   4|   6|   7|   5|   2|| 32
Defeats Abroad         |   6|   4|   4|   2|   3|   2|   1|| 22
Won by One Run         |   2|   3|   2|   0|   3|   4|   1|| 15
Lost by One Run        |   5|   1|   4|   4|   1|   1|   2|| 18
Highest Score in a Game|13-4| 8-1|17-5|16-9|14-4|18-1|14-5|
Worst Defeat           |2-11| 0-5|1-10| 2-6| 2-8|4-10| 7-9|

The pitching record of the champion team for 1888 is appended:

[**Proofreaders note: Table split into two parts to fit on page]


            |     |     |     |     |     |     |  K
            |     |     |  C  |     |     |  L  |  a
            |     |     |  i  |  B  |  C  |  o  |  n
            |  B  |  A  |  n  |  a  |  l  |  u  |  s
            |  r  |  t  |  c  |  l  |  e  |  i  |  a
            |  o  |  h  |  i  |  t  |  v  |  s  |  s
            |  l  |  l  |  n  |  i  |  e  |  v  |
            |  k  |  e  |  n  |  m  |  l  |  i  |  C
            |  l  |  t  |  a  |  o  |  a  |  l  |  i
            |  y  |  i  |  t  |  r  |  n  |  l  |  t
            |  n  |  c  |  i  |  e  |  d  |  e  |  y
            |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .
------------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+---
            |W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.
------------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--
King        | 8| 4| 6| 3| 5| 4| 6| 5| 1| 6| 3| 6| 1| 1
Hudson      | 1| 3| 3| 2| 2| 0| 5| 1| 7| 2| 6| 0| 2| 2
Chamberlain | 1| 1| 1| 1| 3| 0| 1| 0| 1| 0| 2| 0| 2| 0
Devlin      | 0| 1| 0| 1| 0| 2| 0| 0| 1| 0| 1| 0| 4| 1
Knauff      | 0| 1| 0| 0| 0| 2| 2| 0| 0| 1| 1| 0| 2| 0
Freeman     | 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 1| 0| 0
------------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--
Totals      |10|10|10| 7|10| 8|14| 6|16| 4|16| 4|16| 4


            |              |Per
            |              |Cent
            |              |of
            |Totals.       |Victories.
------------+--------------+---------
            | W. | L. | P. |
------------+----+----+----+---------
King        | 44 | 21 | 65 | .671
Hudson      | 26 | 10 | 36 | .722
Chamberlain | 11 |  2 | 13 | .853
Devlin      |  6 |  5 | 11 | .545
Knauff      |  5 |  4 |  9 | .555
Freeman     |  0 |  1 |  1 | .000
------------+----+----+----+---------
Totals      | 92 | 43 |135 |



The appended record of the six years' work in the American Association
championship arena, showing the winning clubs and their managers, as also
their victories, defeats and percentage of victories, will be found
interesting:


     |WINNING     |        |          |        |      |
YEAR.|CLUB.       |MANAGER.|Victories.|Defeats.|Games.|Percentage.
-----+------------+--------+----------+--------+------+-----------
1882 |Cincinnati  |Thorner |       55 |     25 |   80 | .680
1883 |Athletic    |Simmons |       66 |     32 |   98 | .670
1884 |Metropolitan|Mutrie  |       75 |     32 |  107 | .700
1885 |St. Louis   |Comiskey|       79 |     33 |  112 | .705
1886 |St. Louis   |Comiskey|       93 |     46 |  139 | .669
1887 |St. Louis   |Comiskey|       95 |     40 |  135 | .704
1888 |St. Louis   |Comiskey|       92 |     43 |  135 | .681

THE MONTHLY RECORD.

The record of the victories and defeats scored each month of the
championship campaign is appended, by which it will be seen that the
record of the Brooklyn team for October surpassed that of any other club's
monthly record of the season. Cincinnatis led in April, Brooklyn in May,
the Athletics in June, Cincinnatis in July, St. Louis in August, while in
September St. Louis and Brooklyn tied, Brooklyn leading in October. St.
Louis's best month's work was done in August, Brooklyn's in October, the
Athletics' in June, the Cincinnatis' in July, the Baltimores' in
September, the Clevelands' in September, the Louisvilles' in July, and the
Kansas Citys' in August. Kansas City was the only club which failed in at
least one month to score more victories than defeats, their best record
for any month being a tie in victories and defeats. Here is the table in
full:

           |April.|May. |June.|July.|Aug. |Sept.  |Oct. ||Totals.
-----------+------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-------+-----++-------
           |W.| L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.| W.|L. |W.|L.|| W.|L.
-----------+--+---+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+---+---+--+--++---+---
St. Louis  | 5| 3 |14| 5|16| 7|15|12|18| 3| 18|  8| 6| 5|| 92| 43
Brooklyn   | 7| 5 |18| 4|14| 9|12|11| 8|14| 18|  8|11| 1|| 88| 52
Athletic   | 7| 4 | 7|11|18| 4|12|11|16| 6| 14| 12| 7| 4|| 81| 52
Cincinnati | 8| 3 |15| 6| 9|13|16| 7|12| 9| 11| 14| 9| 2|| 80| 54
Baltimore  | 6| 4 | 7|11|12|12| 9|17| 7|17| 13| 12| 3| 8|| 57| 80
Cleveland  | 2| 9 | 9|11| 6|15|12|13| 6|12| 12| 12| 3|10|| 50| 82
Louisville | 4| 7 | 5|16| 7|15|13|10| 8|14|  7| 18| 4| 7|| 47| 87
Kansas City| 2| 6 | 5|16| 7|14| 9|17|11|11|  8| 15| 2| 8|| 43| 89
-----------+--+---+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+---+---+--+--++---+---
Totals     |41|41 |80|80|89|89|98|98|86|86|100|100|45|45||539|539

The Athletics' victory over Baltimore on June 10, is not counted in the
above table.

The official record of the American Association for the season of 1888 as
sent us by President Wikoff, will be found in full below:

BATTING RECORD.

(In the following, no in or outfielders' record is given unless twenty
games have been played in the position, and no pitcher or catcher's record
is given unless fifteen games have been played.)

[**Proofreaders note: Table split into two parts to fit on page]
    |           |                        |No. of
Rank| Name.     | Club.                  |Games.
----+-----------+------------------------+------
   1| O'Neill   |St. Louis               | 130
   2| Stovey    |Athletic                | 130
   3| Lyons     |Athletic                | 111
   4| Reilly    |Cincinnati              | 126
   5| Collins   |Louisville and Brooklyn | 126
   6| Browning  |Louisville              |  99
   7| Orr       |Brooklyn                |  95
   8| Burns     |Baltimore and Brooklyn  | 129
   9| Wolf      |Louisville              | 127
  10| McKean    |Cleveland               | 130
  11|{Tucker    |Baltimore               | 136
    |{Welch     |Athletic                | 136
  12| Corkhill  |Cincinnati and Brooklyn | 137
  13|{Foutz     |Brooklyn                | 140
    |{Larkin    |Athletic                | 135
  14| Bierbauer |Athletic                | 134
  15| Sullivan  |Athletic                |  28
  16| McCarthy  |St. Louis               | 131
  17|{Trott     |Baltimore               |  31
    |{O'Brien   |Brooklyn                | 136
  18| Weaver    |Louisville              |  26
  19| Comiskey  |St. Louis               | 137
  20| Carpenter |Cincinnati              | 135
  21|{Robinson  |Athletic                |  67
    |{Mattimore |Athletic                |  41
  22|{Davis     |Kansas City             | 122
    |{Herr      |St. Louis               |  43
    |{Stratton  |Louisville              |  65
  23| Smith     |Athletic and            |  35
    |           |Baltimore               |
  24|{Latham    |St. Louis               | 133
    |{Fantz     |Cleveland               | 120
  25| Hudson    |St. Louis               |  55
  26| Griffin   |Baltimore               | 137
  27| Pinkney   |Brooklyn                | 143
  28| Hecker    |Louisville              |  55
  29|{Kappell   |Cincinnati              |  35
    |{Terry     |Brooklyn                |  30
  30| Milligan  |St. Louis               |  63
  31|{McTamany  |Kansas City             | 110
    |{Mullane   |Cincinnati              |  51
  32|{Hamilton  |Kansas City             |  35
    |{Zimmer    |Cleveland               |  63
    |{Goodfellow|Cleveland               |  69
    |{Hotaling  |Cleveland               |  97
  33| Smith     |Louisville              |  56
  34|{Boyle     |St. Louis               |  71
    |{Clark     |Brooklyn                |  45
  35| Cline     |Kansas City             |  73
  36| Donohue   |Kansas City             |  87
  37| Kerins    |Louisville              |  81
  38|{Nicol     |Cincinnati              | 134
    |{Hogan     |Cleveland               |  77
  39| Phillips  |Kansas City             | 129
  40| Gilks     |Cleveland               | 118
  41|{Robinson  |St. Louis               | 134
    |{Stricker  |Cleveland               | 126
  42|{McPhee    |Cincinnati              | 110
    |{Carruthers|Brooklyn                |  94
  43| Keenan    |Cincinnati              |  84
  44|{Tebean    |Cincinnati              | 121
    |{Mack      |Louisville              | 110
  45|{Goldsby   |Baltimore               |  44
    |{Poorman   |Athletic                |  85
  46| Esterbrook|Louisville              |  23
  47|{O'Brien   |Baltimore               |  57
    |{Radford   |Brooklyn                |  91
  48|{Gleason   |Athletic                | 123
    |{Purcell   |Baltimore               | 119
    |           |and Athletic            |
  49| White     |Louisville              | 109
    |           |and St Louis.           |
  50|{Barkley   |Kansas City             | 116
    |{Smith     |Cincinnati              |  40
    |{_Bushong__|Brooklyn                |  69
    |{Baldwin   |Cincinnati              |  66
  51|{Weybing   |Athletic                |  49
    |{Fagan     |Kansas City             |  18
  52| Gunning   |Athletic                |  23
  53|{Shindle   |Baltimore               | 135
    |{Snyder    |Cleveland               |  63
  54|{McClellan |Brooklyn and            |  97
    |           |Cleveland               |
    |{Sommer    |Baltimore               |  79
    |{Allen     |Kansas City             |  37
  55| _Smith_   |Brooklyn                | 103
  56| Cross     |Louisville              |  47
  57| King      |St. Louis               |  65
  58| Werrick   |Louisville              | 109


    |           |No. of|No. of|
    |           |Base  |Stolen|Av. B.H.
Rank| Name.     |Hit.  |Bases.|to A.B.
----+-----------+------+------+-------
   1| O'Neill   |  176 |   24 |  .332
   2| Stovey    |  171 |  156 |  .318
   3| Lyons     |  145 |   45 |  .325
   4| Reilly    |  167 |   80 |  .324
   5| Collins   |  164 |   91 |  .318
   6| Browning  |  120 |   39 |  .313
   7| Orr       |  119 |   16 |  .303
   8| Burns     |  158 |   48 |  .298
   9| Wolf      |  159 |   40 |  .298
  10| McKean    |  161 |   66 |  .297
  11|{Tucker    |  152 |   49 |  .291
    |{Welch     |  160 |  121 |  .291
  12| Corkhill  |  159 |   41 |  .285
  13|{Foutz     |  159 |   40 |  .283
    |{Larkin    |  154 |   19 |  .283
  14| Bierbauer |  148 |   56 |  .279
  15| Sullivan  |   31 |    8 |  .277
  16| McCarthy  |  141 |  109 |  .276
  17|{Trott     |   30 |    3 |  .275
    |{O'Brien   |  147 |   68 |  .275
  18| Weaver    |   31 |   12 |  .274
  19| Comiskey  |  156 |   77 |  .271
  20| Carpenter |  147 |   56 |  .269
  21|{Robinson  |   67 |   15 |  .268
    |{Mattimore |   38 |   14 |  .268
  22|{Davis     |  131 |   45 |  .266
    |{Herr      |   46 |    9 |  .266
    |{Stratton  |   64 |   15 |  .266
  23| Smith     |   31 |    3 |  .265
  24|{Latham    |  150 |  124 |  .264
    |{Fantz     |  124 |   68 |  .264
  25| Hudson    |   51 |    6 |  .262
  26| Griffin   |  141 |   53 |  .261
  27| Pinkney   |  150 |   56 |  .260
  28| Hecker    |   53 |   23 |  .255
  29|{Kappell   |   35 |   22 |  .254
    |{Terry     |   29 |   13 |  .254
  30| Milligan  |   55 |    8 |  .252
  31|{McTamany  |  130 |   56 |  .251
    |{Mullane   |   44 |   13 |  .251
  32|{Hamilton  |   32 |   23 |  .250
    |{Zimmer    |   53 |   18 |  .250
    |{Goodfellow|   68 |    7 |  .250
    |{Hotaling  |  103 |   33 |  .250
  33| Smith     |   48 |   48 |  .246
  34|{Boyle     |   63 |   15 |  .245
    |{Clark     |   37 |   12 |  .245
  35| Cline     |   71 |   30 |  .243
  36| Donohue   |   80 |   12 |  .241
  37| Kerins    |   74 |   20 |  .239
  38|{Nicol     |  128 |  104 |  .236
    |{Hogan     |   63 |   35 |  .236
  39| Phillips  |  120 |   11 |  .235
  40| Gilks     |  110 |   19 |  .232
  41|{Robinson  |  106 |   62 |  .231
    |{Stricker  |  113 |   68 |  .231
  42|{McPhee    |  104 |   53 |  .230
    |{Carruthers|   77 |   33 |  .230
  43| Keenan    |   72 |    8 |  .225
  44|{Tebean    |   95 |   33 |  .228
    |{Mack      |  100 |   23 |  .228
  45|{Goldsby   |   37 |   19 |  .227
    |{Poorman   |   87 |   43 |  .227
  46| Esterbrook|   21 |    6 |  .226
  47|{O'Brien   |   44 |   15 |  .224
    |{Radford   |   70 |   36 |  .224
  48|{Gleason   |  112 |   37 |  .224
    |{Purcell   |  105 |   25 |  .224
  49| White     |  104 |   30 |  .221
  50|{Barkley   |  106 |   16 |  .220
    |{Smith     |   29 |    3 |  .220
    |{_Bushong__|   55 |   11 |  .220
    |{Baldwin   |   58 |    2 |  .220
  51|{Weybing   |   40 |    8 |  .219
    |{Fagan     |   14 |    0 |  .219
  52| Gunning   |   20 |   15 |  .217
  53|{Shindle   |  111 |   59 |  .216
    |{Snyder    |   50 |   10 |  .216
  54|{McClellan |   75 |   29 |  .215
    |{Sommer    |   64 |   15 |  .215
    |{Allen     |   29 |    5 |  .215
  55| _Smith_   |   86 |   31 |  .214
  56| Cross     |   39 |    9 |  .213
  57| King      |   42 |    5 |  .212
  58| Werrick   |   86 |   21 |  .210

A mistake is made in the above record in placing the names of batsmen
whose averages are alike, in the wrong order. Thus, Pratt who played in
but 31 games is placed ahead of O'Brien, who played in 136, both making
the same batting averages.

The official record of the American Association for the season of 1888 as
sent us by President Wikoff, will be found in full below:

BATTING RECORD.

 (In the following, no in or outfielders' record is given unless twenty
games have been played in the position, and no pitcher or catcher's record
is given unless fifteen games have been played.)

R |               |           |      |      |      |Av.
a |               |           |      |No. of|No. of|B.H.
n |               |           |No. of|Base  |Stolen|to
k | Name.         | Club.     |Games.|Hit.  |Bases.|A.B.
--+---------------+-----------+------+------+------+-----
 1| O'Neill       |St. Louis  |  130 |  176 |   24 | .332
 2| Stovey        |Athletic   |  130 |  171 |  156 | .318
 3| Lyons         |Athletic   |  111 |  145 |   45 | .325
 4| Reilly        |Cincinnati |  126 |  167 |   80 | .324
 5| Collins       |Louisville |  126 |  164 |   91 | .318
  |               |and        |      |      |      |
  |               |Brooklyn   |      |      |      |
 6| Browning      |Louisville |   99 |  120 |   39 | .313
 7| Orr           |Brooklyn   |   95 |  119 |   16 | .303
 8| Burns         |Baltimore  |  129 |  158 |   48 | .298
  |               |and        |      |      |      |
  |               |Brooklyn   |      |      |      |
 9| Wolf          |Louisville |  127 |  159 |   40 | .298
10| McKean        |Cleveland  |  130 |  161 |   66 | .297
11|{Tucker        |Baltimore  |  136 |  152 |   49 | .291
  |{Welch         |Athletic   |  136 |  160 |  121 | .291
12| Corkhill      |Cincinnati |  137 |  159 |   41 | .285
  |               |and        |      |      |      |
  |               |Brooklyn   |      |      |      |
13|{Foutz         |Brooklyn   |  140 |  159 |   40 | .283
  |{Larkin        |Athletic   |  135 |  154 |   19 | .283
14| Bierbauer     |Athletic   |  134 |  148 |   56 | .279
15| Sullivan      |Athletic   |   28 |   31 |    8 | .277
16| McCarthy      |St. Louis  |  131 |  141 |  109 | .276
17|{Trott         |Baltimore  |   31 |   30 |    3 | .275
  |{O'Brien       |Brooklyn   |  136 |  147 |   68 | .275
18| Weaver        |Louisville |   26 |   31 |   12 | .274
19| Comiskey      |St. Louis  |  137 |  156 |   77 | .271
20| Carpenter     |Cincinnati |  135 |  147 |   56 | .269
21|{Robinson      |Athletic   |   67 |   67 |   15 | .268
  |{Mattimore     |Athletic   |   41 |   38 |   14 | .268
22|{Davis         |Kansas City|  122 |  131 |   45 | .266
  |{Herr          |St. Louis  |   43 |   46 |    9 | .266
  |{Stratton      |Louisville |   65 |   64 |   15 | .266
23| Smith         |Athletic   |   35 |   31 |    3 | .265
  |               |and        |      |      |      |
  |               |Baltimore  |      |      |      |
24|{Latham        |St. Louis  |  133 |  150 |  124 | .264
  |{Fantz         |Cleveland  |  120 |  124 |   68 | .264
25| Hudson        |St. Louis  |   55 |   51 |    6 | .262
26| Griffin       |Baltimore  |  137 |  141 |   53 | .261
27| Pinkney       |Brooklyn   |  143 |  150 |   56 | .260
28| Hecker        |Louisville |   55 |   53 |   23 | .255
29|{Kappell       |Cincinnati |   35 |   35 |   22 | .254
  |{Terry         |Brooklyn   |   30 |   29 |   13 | .254
30| Milligan      |St. Louis  |   63 |   55 |    8 | .252
31|{McTamany      |Kansas City|  110 |  130 |   56 | .251
  |{Mullane       |Cincinnati |   51 |   44 |   13 | .251
32|{Hamilton      |Kansas City|   35 |   32 |   23 | .250
  |{Zimmer        |Cleveland  |   63 |   53 |   18 | .250
  |{Goodfellow    |Cleveland  |   69 |   68 |    7 | .250
  |{Hotaling      |Cleveland  |   97 |  103 |   33 | .250
33| Smith         |Louisville |   56 |   48 |   48 | .246
34|{Boyle         |St. Louis  |   71 |   63 |   15 | .245
  |{Clark         |Brooklyn   |   45 |   37 |   12 | .245
35| Cline         |Kansas City|   73 |   71 |   30 | .243
36| Donohue       |Kansas City|   87 |   80 |   12 | .241
37| Kerins        |Louisville |   81 |   74 |   20 | .239
38|{Nicol         |Cincinnati |  134 |  128 |  104 | .236
  |{Hogan         |Cleveland  |   77 |   63 |   35 | .236
39| Phillips      |Kansas City|  129 |  120 |   11 | .235
40| Gilks         |Cleveland  |  118 |  110 |   19 | .232
41|{Robinson      |St. Louis  |  134 |  106 |   62 | .231
  |{Stricker      |Cleveland  |  126 |  113 |   68 | .231
42|{McPhee        |Cincinnati |  110 |  104 |   53 | .230
  |{Carruthers    |Brooklyn   |   94 |   77 |   33 | .230
43| Keenan        |Cincinnati |   84 |   72 |    8 | .225
44|{Tebean        |Cincinnati |  121 |   95 |   33 | .228
  |{Mack          |Louisville |  110 |  100 |   23 | .228
45|{Goldsby       |Baltimore  |   44 |   37 |   19 | .227
  |{Poorman       |Athletic   |   85 |   87 |   43 | .227
46| Esterbrook    |Louisville |   23 |   21 |    6 | .226
47|{O'Brien       |Baltimore  |   57 |   44 |   15 | .224
  |{Radford       |Brooklyn   |   91 |   70 |   36 | .224
48|{Gleason       |Athletic   |  123 |  112 |   37 | .224
  |{Purcell       |Baltimore  |  119 |  105 |   25 | .224
  |               |and        |      |      |      |
  |               |Athletic   |      |      |      |
49| White         |Louisville |  109 |  104 |   30 | .221
  |               |and St.    |      |      |      |
  |               |Louis      |      |      |      |
50|{Barkley       |Kansas City|  116 |  106 |   16 | .220
  |{Smith         |Cincinnati |   40 |   29 |    3 | .220
  |{_Bushong_     |Brooklyn   |   69 |   55 |   11 | .220
  |{Baldwin       |Cincinnati |   66 |   58 |    2 | .220
51|{Weybing       |Athletic   |   49 |   40 |    8 | .219
  |{Fagan         |Kansas City|   18 |   14 |    0 | .219
52| Gunning       |Athletic   |   23 |   20 |   15 | .217
53|{Shindle       |Baltimore  |  135 |  111 |   59 | .216
  |{Snyder        |Cleveland  |   63 |   50 |   10 | .216
54|{McClellan     |Brooklyn   |   97 |   75 |   29 | .215
  |               |and        |      |      |      |
  |               |Cleveland  |      |      |      |
  |{Sommer        |Baltimore  |   79 |   64 |   15 | .215
  |{Allen         |Kansas City|   37 |   29 |    5 | .215
55| _Smith_       |Brooklyn   |  103 |   86 |   31 | .214
56| Cross         |Louisville |   47 |   39 |    9 | .213
57| King          |St. Louis  |   65 |   42 |    5 | .212
58| Werrick       |Louisville |  109 |   86 |   21 | .210
59| Raymond       |Louisville |   32 |   26 |    6 | .208
60| McGuire       |Cleveland  |   25 |   18 |    1 | .207
61| Ewing         |Louisville |   21 |   16 |    6 | .205
62| Daniels       |Kansas City|   61 |   46 |   19 | .205
63| Vaughn        |Louisville |   49 |   37 |    5 | .203
64| Greenwood     |Baltimore  |  113 |   82 |   54 | .202
64| Andrews       |Louisville |   27 |   20 |    5 | .202
65| O'Connor      |Cincinnati |   36 |   28 |   13 | .201
66| Cook          |Louisville |   53 |   35 |   15 | .200
67| _Peoples_     |Brooklyn   |   33 |   21 |    9 | .198
68| Farrell       |Baltimore  |  103 |   79 |   32 | .197
69| Fennelly      |Cincinnati |  127 |   96 |   49 | .196
  |               |and        |      |      |      |
  |               |Athletic   |      |      |      |
70| Esterday      |Kansas City|  114 |   78 |   18 | .195
70| Rowe          |Kansas City|   32 |   24 |    1 | .195
71| Albert        |Cleveland  |  101 |   69 |   32 | .192
72| Lyons         |St. Louis  |  123 |   95 |   42 | .190
73| Cunningham    |Baltimore  |   51 |   33 |    2 | .198
74| McGarr        |St. Louis  |   35 |   25 |   25 | .187
75| O'Brien       |Cleveland  |   31 |   20 |    2 | .185
76| McGlone       |Cleveland  |   55 |   37 |   26 | .183
77| Fulmer        |Baltimore  |   51 |   30 |   17 | .179
78| Hankinson     |Kansas City|   37 |   27 |    2 | .175
79| Brennan       |Kansas City|   34 |   20 |    6 | .174
80| Kilroy        |Baltimore  |   43 |   24 |   12 | .166
81| Cantz         |Baltimore  |   37 |   21 |    1 | .165
82| Chamberlain   |Louisville |   40 |   23 |   12 | .161
  |               |and St.    |      |      |      |
  |               |Louis      |      |      |      |
83| Seward        |Athletic   |   64 |   35 |   12 | .154
84| Townsend      |Athletic   |   43 |   24 |    1 | .150
84| Hughes        |Brooklyn   |   39 |   20 |    3 | .150
85| Tomney        |Louisville |   34 |   18 |   12 | .149
86| Porter        |Kansas City|   55 |   27 |    1 | .137
87| Bakely        |Cleveland  |   60 |   25 |    1 | .131
88| Burdock       |Brooklyn   |   60 |   30 |    9 | .125
89| Ramsey        |Louisville |   41 |   17 |    0 | .123
90| Holbert       |Brooklyn   |   15 |    6 |    1 | .115
91| Sullivan      |Kansas City|   28 |   10 |    7 | .109
92| Mays          |Brooklyn   |   18 |    6 |    2 | .095
93| Viau          |Cincinnati |   41 |   12 |    3 | .085
94| Crowell       |Louisville |   19 |    5 |    2 | .080
  |               |and        |
  |               |Cleveland  |


FIELDING RECORD.

CATCHERS.

Rank|NAME.     |CLUB.      |Number|Chances|Per Cent.
    |          |           |Games.|Offered|Accepted.
----+----------+-----------+------+-------+---------
 1  | Donohue  |Kansas City|   66 |   395 | .965
 2  |(Robinson |Athletic   |   66 |   595 | .955
    |{Keenan   |Cincinnati |   70 |   536 | .955
 3  | Milligan |St. Louis  |   58 |   429 | .944
 4  | Holbert  |Brooklyn   |   15 |   106 | .934
 5  | Boyle    |St. Louis  |   70 |   539 | .933
 6  | Cross    |Louisville |   38 |   292 | .928
 7  | Snyder   |Cleveland  |   43 |   334 | .922
 8  | Zimmer   |Cleveland  |   56 |   443 | .921
 9  | Trott    |Baltimore  |   27 |   205 | .917
10  |{Vaughn   |Louisville |   25 |   184 | .913
    |{Baldwin  |Cincinnati |   64 |   483 | .913
11  | Bushong  |Brooklyn   |   68 |   489 | .9**
    |          |           |      |       |   [A]
12  | Townsend |Athletic   |   43 |   330 | .906
13  | O'Brien  |Baltimore  |   38 |   274 | .905
14  | Fulmer   |Baltimore  |   46 |   309 | .903
15  | Cook     |Louisville |   50 |   316 | .902
16  | Gunning  |Athletic   |   23 |   192 | .896
17  | Cantz    |Baltimore  |   33 |   227 | .890
18  | Kerins   |Louisville |   30 |   320 | .888
19  | Brennan  |Kansas City|   25 |   176 | .887
20  | McGuire  |Cleveland  |   16 |   131 | .885
21  | Daniels  |Kansas City|   31 |   232 | .875
22  | Clark    |Brooklyn   |   36 |   307 | .857
23  | Peoples  |Brooklyn   |   26 |   252 | .841

[*Proofreaders Note A: * number indecipherable.]

PITCHERS.
Rank| NAME.      |CLUB.      |Number|Chances|Per Cent.
    |            |           |Games.|Offered|Accepted.
----+------------+-----------+------+-------+--------
 1  | Chamberlain|Louisville |   37 |   255 | .988
    |            |and St.    |      |       |
    |            |Louis      |      |       |
 2  | Ewing      |Louisville |   21 |   135 | .985
 3  | Terry      |Brooklyn   |   24 |   186 | .978
 4  | Mays       |Brooklyn   |   18 |   12O | .975
 5  | Foutz      |Brooklyn   |   19 |   115 | .974
 6  | Sullivan   |Kansas City|   24 |   167 | .970
 7  | Stratton   |Louisville |   34 |   184 | .968
 8  |(Hudson     |St. Louis  |   37 |   230 | .962
    |{Kilroy     |Baltimore  |   42 |   229 | .965
 9  |{Hughes     |Brooklyn   |   39 |   261 | .962
    |{King       |St. Louis  |   65 |   397 | .962
10  |{Crowell    |Cleveland  |      |       |
    |            |and        |      |       |
    |            |Louisville |   19 |   103 | .961
    |{Bakely     |Cleveland  |   60 |   359 | .961
    |{Mullane    |Cincinnati |   44 |   284 | .961
    |{Viau       |Cincinnati |   41 |   257 | .961
11  | Seward     |Athletic   |   57 |   428 | .957
12  | O'Brien    |Cleveland  |   29 |   213 | .953
13  | Porter     |Kansas City|   55 |   507 | .951
14  |{Weyhing |Athletic      |   48 |   328 | .948
    |{Smith      |Cincinnati |   4O |   211 | .948
15  | Carruthers |Brooklyn   |   45 |   273 | .945
16  | Hecker     |Louisville |   28 |   154 | .942
17  | Smith      |Athletic   |   38 |   248 | .940
    |            |and        |      |       |
    |            |Baltimore  |      |       |
19  | Cunningham |Baltimore  |   51 |   335 | .934
20  | Ramsey     |Louisville |   37 |   290 | .924
21  | Mattimore  |Athletic   |   26 |   162 | .914
81  | Fagan      |Kansas City|   17 |    92 | .913
{sic.}|

This table is rendered useless as a criterion of a pitcher's skill as a
fielder, on account of the mixing up of assistances on strikes with
fielding assistances, which are distinct and separate figures for data.

FIRST BASEMEN.

Rank|NAME.       |CLUB.      |Number|Chances|Per Cent.
    |            |           |Games.|Offered|Accepted.
----+------------+-----------+------+-------+--------
 1  | Andrews    |Louisville.|   27 |   302 | .993
 2  |{Foutz      |Brooklyn   |   42 |   371 | .986
    |{Faatz      |Cleveland  |  120 |  1247 | .986
 3  | Orr        |Brooklyn   |   95 |  1044 | .980
 4  | Reilly     |Cincinnati |  116 |  1313 | .979
 5  | Phillips   |Kansas City|  119 |  1500 | .977
 6  | Tucker     |Baltimore  |  129 |  1441 | .975
 7  | Smith      |Louisville |   56 |   578 | .974
 8  |{Larkin     |Athletic   |  121 |  1294 | .972
    |{Comiskey   |St. Louis  |  133 |  1379 | .972
 9  | Esterbrook |Louisville |   23 |   238 | .958
10  |Hecker      |Louisville |   27 |   294 | .952


SECOND BASEMEN.

Rank|NAME.       |CLUB.      |Number|Chances|Per Cent.
    |            |           |Games.|Offered|Accepted.
----+------------+-----------+------+-------+--------
 1  | Berkley    |Kansas City|  116 |   683 | .941
 2  |{Striekler  |Cleveland  |  122 |   791 | .938
    |{McPhee     |Cincinnati |  110 |   776 | .938
 3  | Bierbauer  |Athletics  |  122 |   795 | .935
 4  | Collins    |Louisville |   30 |   170 | .926
    |            |and        |      |       |
    |            |Brooklyn   |      |       |
 5  | McClellan  |Brooklyn   |   62 |   346 | .920
    |            |and        |      |       |
    |            |Cleveland. |      |       |
 6  | Burdock    |Brooklyn   |   69 |   431 | .919
 7  | Mack       |Louisville |  110 |   703 | .915
 8  |{Greenwood  |Baltimore  |   87 |   442 | .914
    |{Farrell    |Baltimore  |   47 |   174 | .913
 9  | McGarr     |St. Louis  |   34 |   193 | .915
10  | Robinson   |St. Louis  |  100 |   496 | .904

SHORT STOPS.

Rank|NAME.    |CLUB.        |Number|Chances|Per Cent.
    |         |             |Games.|Offered|Accepted.
----+---------+-------------+------+-------+--------
 1  |Farell   |Baltimore    |   56 |   395 | .937
 2  |Tomney   |Louisville   |   34 |   174 | .914
 3  |Esterday |Kansas City  |  114 |   640 | .900
 4  |McKean   |Cleveland    |   75 |   380 | .895
 5  |Sommer   |Baltimore    |   32 |   161 | .885
 6  |Herr     |St.Louis     |   28 |   133 | .872
 7  |Fenelly  |Cincinnati   |  120 |   723 | .871
    |         |and          |      |       |
    |         |Athletic     |      |       |
 8  |Gleason  |Athletic     |  121 |   565 | .865
 9  |Wolf     |Louisville   |   38 |   222 | .860
10  |Alberts  |Cleveland    |   52 |   272 | .857
11  |Burns    |Baltimore    |   53 |   277 | .848
    |         |and          |      |       |
    |         |Brooklyn     |      |       |
12  |Smith    |Brooklyn     |  103 |   600 | .847
13  |Robinson |St. Louis    |   34 |   168 | .845
14  |Greenwood|Baltimore    |   26 |   118 | .831
15  |White    |Louisville   |   96 |   596 | .827
    |         |and St. Louis|      |       |
16  |Kapell   |Cincinnati   |   21 |   107 | .785


LEFT FIELDERS.

Rank|NAME.       |CLUB.      |Number|Chances|Per Cent.
    |            |           |Games.|Offered|Accepted.
----+------------+-----------+------+-------+--------
 1  |Stovey   |Athletic   |  117 |   226 | .950
 2  |Browning |Louisville |   21 |    35 | .943
 3  |Allen    |Kansas City|   33 |    80 | .938
 4  |O'Neill  |St. Louis  |  130 |   257 | .934
 5  |O'Brien  |Brooklyn   |  136 |   261 | .931
 6  |Collins  |Louisville |   57 |   152 | .921
    |         |and        |      |       |
    |         |Brooklyn   |      |       |
 7  |{Sommer  |Baltimore  |   30 |    56 | .911
    |{Tebeau  |Cincinnati |  121 |   235 | .911
 8  |Vaughn   |Louisville |   20 |    40 | .900
 9  |Goldsby  |Baltimore  |   42 |    58 | .893
10  |McKean   |Cleveland  |   43 |    88 | .886
11  |{Hogan   |Cleveland  |   26 |    41 | .878
    |{Gilks   |Cleveland  |   58 |   115 | .878
12  |Burns    |Baltimore  |   47 |   120 | .833
    |         |and        |      |       |
    |         |Brooklyn   |      |       |
13  |Cline    |Kansas City|   26 |    46 | .826
14  |Sullivan |Kansas City|   16 |    25 | .800
15  |Stratton |Louisville |   23 |    37 | .730


THIRD BASEMEN.

Rank|NAME.    |CLUB.      |Number|Chances|Per Cent.
    |         |           |Games.|Offered|Accepted.
----+---------+-----------+------+-------+--------
 1  |Shindle  |Baltimore  |  135 |   606 | .919
 2  |Pinkney  |Brooklyn   |  143 |   470 | .896
 3  |Albert   |Cleveland  |   48 |   198 | .894
 4  |Lyons    |Athletic   |  111 |   397 | .889
 5  |Latham   |St. Louis  |  132 |   525 | .882
 6  |Carpenter|Cincinnati |  135 |   491 | .878
 7  |Raymond  |Louisville |   31 |   129 | .876
 8  |Davis    |Kansas City|  114 |   576 | .849
 9  |Werrick  |Louisville |   89 |   321 | .822
10  |Gilks    |Cleveland  |   26 |   109 | .798
11  |McGlone  |Cleveland  |   48 |   198 | .793

RIGHT FIELDERS

Rank|NAME.     |CLUB.      |Number|Chances|Per Cent.
    |          |           |Games.|Offered|Accepted.
----+----------+-----------+------+-------+---------
 1  |Hogan     |Cleveland  |   51 |    90 | .988
 2  |McClellan |Brooklyn   |   32 |    52 | .962
    |          |and        |      |       |
    |          |Cleveland  |      |       |
 3  |Nicol     |Cincinnati |  124 |   218 | .959
 4  |Hamilton  |Kansas City|   29 |    35 | .943
 5  |Foutz     |Brooklyn   |   78 |   251 | .932
 6  |McCarthy  |St. Louis  |  118 |   276 | .924
 7  |Purcell   |Athletic   |  111 |   182 | .923
    |          |and        |      |       |
    |          |Baltimore  |      |       |
 8  |Carruthers|Brooklyn   |   31 |    80 | .900
 8  |Cline     |Kansas City|   44 |    80 | .900
 9  |Poorman   |Athletic   |   85 |   134 | .896
10  |Wolf      |Louisville |   83 |   158 | .892
11  |McTamany  |Kansas City|   48 |    92 | .891
12  |Goodfellow|Cleveland  |   51 |   100 | .850
13  |Kerins    |Louisville |   35 |    61 | .820

CENTER FIELDERS.

Rank|NAME.   |CLUB.      |Number |Chances |Per Cent.
    |        |           |Games. |Offered |Accepted.
----+--------+-----------+-------+--------+---------
 1  |Welch   |Athletic   |   135 |    309 | .968
 2  |Corkhill|Cincinnati |   131 |    320 | .966
    |        |and        |       |        |
    |        |Brooklyn   |       |        |
 3  |Gilks   |Cleveland  |    26 |     50 | .960
 4  |Radford |Brooklyn   |    84 |    208 | .947
 5  |Griffin |Baltimore  |   137 |    323 | .941
 6  |McTamany|Kansas City|    68 |    206 | .932
 7  |Lyons   |St. Louis  |   108 |    267 | .910
 8  |Weaver  |Louisville |    26 |     49 | .898
 8  |Rowe    |Kansas City|    32 |     68 | .897
 9  |Browning|Louisville |    78 |    181 | .884
10  |Hotaling|Cleveland  |    97 |    200 | .875
11  |Collins |Louisville |    24 |     61 | .852
    |        |and        |       |        |
    |        |Brooklyn   |       |        |
12  |O'Connor|Cincinnati |    19 |     39 | .846

CLUB BATTING RECORD


Rank|Clubs      |Number  |Times |Runs|Number |Stolen|Per cent
    |           |of Games|at Bat|    |of Base|Bases |B. H. to
    |           |        |      |    |Hits   |      |A. B.
----+-----------+--------+------+----+-------+------+------
1   |Athletic   |    136 | 4801 | 828|  1262 |  568 | .263
2   |St. Louis  |    137 | 4753 | 790|  1188 |  526 | .250
3   |Louisville |    137 | 4807 | 678|  1190 |  368 | .248
4   |Brooklyn   |    143 | 4868 | 757|  1183 |  413 | .243
5   |Cincinnati |    136 | 4762 | 734|  1143 |  464 | .240
6   |Cleveland  |    134 | 4560 | 641|  1073 |  399 | .235
7   |Baltimore  |    137 | 4654 | 653|  1073 |  379 | .231
8   |Kansas City|    132 | 4582 | 578|  1011 |  266 | .221
                +--------+------+----+-------+------+------
    |Total      |   1092 |37787 |5659|  9123 | 3383 | .241


CLUB FIELDING RECORD.

Rank|Clubs       |Number|Put  |Assists.|Errors.|Total   |Per c.
    |            |Of    |Outs.|        |       |Chances |Chances
    |            |Games |     |        |       |Offered.|Accepted.
----+------------+------+-----+--------+-------+--------+---------
   1|Cincinnati  |  136 | 3671|   2266 |   445 |   6382 | .940
   2|Athletic    |  136 | 3623|   2315 |   422 |   6360 | .934
   3|St. Louis   |  137 | 3635|   2092 |   432 |   6159 | .930
   4|Baltimore   |  137 | 3597|   2226 |   452 |   6269 | .928
   5|Brooklyn    |  143 | 3851|   2318 |   508 |   6677 | .924
   6|{Kansas City|  132 | 3471|   2321 |   500 |   6292 | .921
    |{Cleveland  |  134 | 3484|   2217 |   487 |   6188 | .921
   7|Louisville  |  137 | 3631|   2307 |   566 |   6504 | .913
                        +-----+--------+-------+--------+-------
    |Total       |      | 8963|  18056 |  3812 |  50831 | .927


CHICAGO GAMES.

The following is the record of the "Chicago" games played in the American
Association championship arena in 1888, games in which the defeated nine
fails to score a single run:

CLUBS.     |   |   |   |   |   |   |   | K ||
           |   |   |   | C |   |   | L | a ||
           | S |   |   | i | B | C | o | n || V
           | t | B | A | n | a | l | u | s || i
           | . | r | t | c | l | e | i | a || c
           |   | o | h | i | t | v | s | s || t
           | L | o | l | n | i | e | v |   || o
           | o | k | e | n | m | l | i | C || r
           | u | l | t | a | o | a | l | i || i
           | i | y | i | t | r | n | l | t || e
           | s | n | c | i | e | d | e | y || s
           | . | . | . | . | . | . | . | . || .
-----------+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++--
St. Louis  | --|  3|  2|  0|  2|  4|  1|  0||12
Brooklyn   |  1| --|  1|  1|  0|  3|  1|  1|| 8
Athletic   |  1|  1| --|  2|  2|  1|  1|  5||13
Cincinnati |  1|  1|  1| --|  1|  2|  1|  2|| 9
Baltimore  |  0|  0|  1|  1| --|  0|  0|  1|| 3
Cleveland  |  1|  0|  0|  2|  1| --|  0|  2|| 6
Louisville |  0|  2|  0|  1|  1|  2| --|  0|| 6
Kansas City|  0|  2|  0|  0|  1|  0|  1| --|| 4
           +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++---
Defeats    |  4|  9|  5|  7|  8| 12|  5| 11||61


EXTRA INNINGS GAME.

The ganes-victories, defeats and drawn-which required extra innings to be
played, were as follows:

Clubs      |   |   |   |   |   |   |   | K ||  |
           |   |   |   | C |   |   | L | a ||  |
           | S |   |   | i | B | C | o | n ||V |
           | t | B | A | n | a | l | u | s ||I |
           | . | r | t | c | l | e | i | a ||c |
           |   | o | h | i | t | v | s | s ||t |
           | L | o | l | n | i | e | v |   ||o | D
           | o | k | e | n | m | l | i | C ||r | r
           | u | l | t | a | o | a | l | I ||i | a
           | i | y | i | t | r | n | l | t ||e | w
           | s | n | c | i | e | d | e | y ||s | n
           | . | . | . | . | . | . | . | . ||. | .
-----------+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++--+---
St. Louis  | --|  2|  2|  0|  1|  0|  1|  0|| 5|  2
Brooklyn   |  2| --|  2|  3|  0|  0|  2|  1||10|  2
Athletic   |  1|  1| --|  2|  1|  0|  2|  0|| 7|  2
Cincinnati |  3|  2|  2| --|  1|  2|  1|  0||11|  2
Baltimore  |  2|  0|  0|  0| --|  0|  1|  0|| 3|  0
Cleveland  |  0|  0|  1|  1|  0| --|  0|  0|| 2|  1
Louisville |  0|  0|  2|  0|  0|  0| --|  1|| 3|  1
Kansas City|  0|  0|  0|  1|  0|  0|  0| --|| 1|  0
           +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---++--+---
Defeats    |  8|  5|  9|  7|  3|  2|  6|  2||42| 10

The record of the series of games won and lost by each club with every
other club in the American Association championship arena in 1888 is as
follows:

           |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |  K  ||
           |     |     |     |  C  |     |  L  |     |  a  ||
           |     |  S  |     |  i  |  B  |  o  |  C  |  n  ||
           |  B  |  t  |  A  |  n  |  a  |  u  |  l  |  s  ||
           |  r  |  .  |  t  |  c  |  l  |  i  |  e  |  a  ||
           |  o  |     |  h  |  i  |  t  |  s  |  v  |  s  ||
           |  o  |  L  |  l  |  n  |  i  |  v  |  e  |     ||
           |  k  |  o  |  e  |  n  |  m  |  i  |  l  |  C  ||
           |  l  |  u  |  t  |  a  |  o  |  l  |  a  |  i  ||
           |  y  |  I  |  i  |  t  |  r  |  l  |  n  |  t  ||
           |  n  |  s  |  c  |  i  |  e  |  e  |  d  |  y  ||Series
Clubs      |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  |  .  ||Totals.
-----------+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----++--------
           |W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.|W.|L.||W.|L.
-----------+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--++--+-----
Brooklyn   |--|--|10|10|12| 8|14| 6|12| 8|13| 8|16| 4|11| 9|| 6| 0
St. Louis  |10|10|--|--|10| 7|10| 8|15| 5|16| 4|16| 4|16| 4|| 4| 0
Athletic   | 8|12| 7|10|--|--|10|10|15| 5|15| 5|13| 7|11| 3|| 4| 1
Cincinnati | 6|14| 8|10|10|10|--|--|14| 6|17| 3|10| 7|15| 4|| 3| 1
Baltimore  | 8|12| 5|15| 5|15| 6|14|--|--|11| 9|10| 9|11| 9|| 2| 4
Louisville | 8|13| 4|16| 5|15| 3|17| 9|11|--|--| 8| 9|11| 6|| 1| 5
Cleveland  | 4|16| 4|16| 7|13| 7|10| 9|10| 9| 8|--|--| 9| 9|| 0| 3
Kansas City| 9|11| 4|16| 3|14| 4|15| 9|11| 6|11| 9| 9|--|--|| 0| 6

The St. Louis, Brooklyn, Athletic and Cincinnati Clubs, each had one
series tied; while the Baltimore Club had four unfinished series; the St.
Louis and Cincinnati Clubs two each, and the Athletic, Baltimore,
Louisville and Kansas City Clubs one each, The Brooklyn Club playing their
full quota of scheduled games.

THE YEARLY RECORD.

The appended table gives the number of games won by all the clubs which
have competed for the American Association championship from 1882 to 1888
inclusive:


Clubs       |1882|1883|1884|1885|1886|1887|1888|Yrs.||Total
            |    |    |    |    |    |    |    |    ||Vict'r's
------------+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----++---------
St. Louis   |  37|  65|  67|  79|  92|  94|  92|   7|| 526
Cincinnati  |  55|  62|  68|  63|  64|  80|  80|   7|| 472
Athletic    |  41|  66|  61|  55|  60|  64|  81|   7|| 428
Baltimore   |  19|  28|  63|  41|  48|  76|  57|   7|| 332
Louisville  |  42|  52|  68|  53|  66|  76|  48|   7|| 405
Metropolitan|  --|  54|  75|  44|  53|  43|  --|   6|| 269
Pittsburg   |  39|  30|  30|  56|  78|  --|  --|   5|| 233
Brooklyn    |  --|  --|  40|  53|  76|  59|  88|   5|| 316
Columbus    |  --|  32|  69|  --|  --|  --|  --|   2|| 104
Cleveland   |  --|  --|  --|  --|  --|  38|  50|   2||  88
Indianapolis|  --|  --|  29|  --|  --|  --|  --|   1||  29
Washington  |  --|  --|  12|  --|  --|  --|  --|   1||  12
Virginia    |  --|  --|  12|  --|  --|  --|  --|   1||  12
Kansas City |  --|  --|  --|  --|  --|  --|  43|   1||  43
Toledo      |  --|  --|  46|  --|  --|  --|  --|   1||  46
            +----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----------
Total       | 233| 389| 640| 444| 537| 530| 539|

A COMPARATIVE RECORD.

The following table gives the comparative figures of the League and the
Association in their Championship contests in 1888:

Clubs        |Vic.|Def |Pct.  ||Clubs      |Vic.|Def.|Pct.
-------------+----+----+------++-----------+----+----+------
New York     | 84 | 47 | .641 ||St. Louis  | 92 | 43 | .681
Chicago      | 77 | 58 | .570 ||Brooklyn   | 88 | 52 | .629
Philadelphia | 69 | 61 | .531 ||Athletic   | 82 | 52 | .612
Boston       | 70 | 64 | .522 ||Cincinnati | 80 | 54 | .597
Detroit      | 68 | 63 | .519 ||Baltimore  | 57 | 81 | .413
Pittsburg    | 66 | 68 | .493 ||Cleveland  | 50 | 82 | .379
Indianapolis | 50 | 85 | .370 ||Louisville | 48 | 87 | .356
Washington   | 48 | 86 | .358 ||Kansas City| 43 | 89 | .328

NEW YORK AND BROOKLYN RECORDS.

The New York League Club and the Brooklyn American Association Club
closed the first six years of their existence in 1888. The New York Club
joined the League in 1883, and won the championship in 1888. The principal
statistics of the club's work on the diamond field during that period is
shown in the appended table:

Years |Won. |Lost.|Drawn.|Played.|Batting |Fielding
      |     |     |      |       |Average.|Average
------+-----+-----+------+-------+--------+--------
1883  |  46 |  50 |    2 |    98 |   .256 | .825
1884  |  62 |  50 |    4 |   116 |   .257 | .816
1885  |  85 |  27 |    0 |   112 |   .269 | .866
1886  |  75 |  44 |    5 |   124 |   .269 | .853
1887  |  68 |  55 |    6 |   129 |   .331 | .886
1888  |  84 |  47 |    7 |   138 |   .240 | .918
      +-----+-----+------+-------+--------+------
Totals| 420 | 273 |   24 |   717 |   .270 | .860

During these six seasons the New Yorks played 398 games with the
Chicagos, Detroits, Bostons and Philadelphias, winning 223 and losing 175.
Of these four clubs the New Yorks found the Chicagos to be their strongest
opponents, and the Bostons their weakest. One hundred games were played
with each of the two clubs, the New Yorks winning sixty-one from Boston,
and only forty-one from Chicago.

The Brooklyn Club began its career in 1883 by winning the championship of
the Interstate Association of that year, and in 1884 the club entered the
American Association.

The following is the record of the Brooklyn Club's field work in the
first six years of its history:

Years.   |Victories.|Defeats.|Games  |Drawn.|Pr. Ct. of
         |          |        |Played.|      |Champ. Victs.
---------+----------+--------+-------+------+------------
1883     |       65 |     33 |   101 |    3 |   .643
1884     |       57 |     75 |   136 |    4 |   .384
1885     |       83 |     67 |   142 |    2 |   .473
1886     |       91 |     63 |   160 |    6 |   .557
1887     |       78 |     80 |   156 |    4 |   .448
1888     |       88 |     52 |   160 |    3 |   .629
Totals   +----------+--------+-------+------+---------
six years|      462 |    370 |   875 |   22

Each club won championship honors in but one season out of six, the
Brooklyns beginning by winning a pennant, and the New Yorkers ending with
championship honors.

THE PHILADELPHIA CITY CHAMPIONSHIP.

The Philadelphia League Club and the American Association Athletic Club
played a spring and fall exhibition game series for the professional
championship of Philadelphia, the result of which was a victory for the
American teams, as will be seen by the appended record:

ATHLETIC VICTORIES.

ATHLETIC VS. PHILADELPHIA.
-------------------------------------
DATE.       PITCHERS.          Score.
-------------------------------------
April 9     Seward, Gleason     4-2
April 11    Seward, Sanders    15-4
April 12    Weyhing Casey       7-1
April 14    Seward, Gleason     3-1
April 16    Weyhing, Tyng      13-7
October 18  Seward, Sanders     8-5
-------------------------------------

PHILADELPHIA VICTORIES.

PHILADELPHIA VS. ATHLETIC.
----------------------------------------
DATE.          PITCHERS.          Score.
---------------------------------------
April 13      Gleason, Mattimore   8-2
April 17      Buffinton, Blair     7-1
October 19    Casey, Weyhing       8-0
October 20    Buffinton, Smith    12-0

THE EXHIBITION GAME CAMPAIGN.

The experience of the season of 1888 in the playing of exhibition games
during the spring and fall between League and American Clubs, shows that
while the spring series prove attractive, owing to the desire of the
patrons of the game to see how the club teams of the two organizations
compare with each other in relative strength, preparatory to the opening
of the championship campaign in each arena; those played in the fall,
after the two championships have been decided, have ceased to draw paying
patronage. This decrease of interest in the fall exhibition games, too,
has been largely due to the introduction of the World's Championship
series, which now monopolize public interest after the regular
championship season has ended. It has been proposed to substitute a series
of regular championship matches, on the basis of the series of the world's
championship contests for the old time fall exhibition games, the plan in
question including not only games between the championship teams of the
League and the Association, but also between all the eight clubs of each
organization,  so as to show which are the eight leading club teams of the
League, and the American Association. Had this plan been carried out in
1888, we should not only have had the interesting series between the two
champion teams of New York and St. Louis, but also those between Chicago
and Brooklyn, Philadelphia  and Athletic, Boston and Cincinnati, Detroit
and Baltimore, Pittsburg and Cleveland, Indianapolis and Louisville, and
Washington and Kansas City. It is to be hoped that a grand test series of
games of this character will mark the closing professional campaign of
1889, for such a series would substitute very interesting championship
matches for October in the place of the unmeaning and useless exhibition
games of the past fall campaigns.


THE WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP.

THE FULL RECORD OF THE SERIES.

It has now become an established rule of the National League and the
American Association, to close each season with a supplementary
championship series of games between the teams of the two leading clubs
winning the respective championships of the two organizations each year,
to decide as to which of the two champion clubs is entitled to the honor
of being the champion club of the United States, and consequently the
world's champions in base ball. This supplementary series of games has
grown in importance each year since the inaugural trial games of 1884,
when a short series of games of this character took place on the Polo
Grounds in October, 1884, between the League championship team of the
Providence Club and the American championship team of the Metropolitan
Club. It was a short series of best two games of the three played, the
result being an easy victory for the League team, as the appended record
shows:

THE SERIES OF 1884.

Oct. 23, Providence vs. Metropolitan, at the Polo Grounds    6--0
Oct. 24, Providence vs. Metropolitan, at the Polo Grounds    3--1
Oct. 25, Providence vs. Metropolitan, at the Polo Grounds   12--2
Total                                                       21--3


THE SERIES OF 1885.

In 1885 the St. Louis Club first won the honors in the American pennant
race, and the Chicago team in that of the League, and in October of that
year the rival teams contested for the United States championship in a
series of best four out of seven games. Though the series was a far more
important one than that of 1884, still the rules governing the special
games were not what they should have been, and consequently the result was
not satisfactory, as a dispute, followed by a forfeited game, led to a
draw contest and an equal division of the gate receipts.

In this series $1,000 was the prize competed for, and as neither team won
the series, each club received $500 of the prize money, each winning three
games after the first game had been drawn. The record of these games is
appended:

Oct. 14, St, Louis vs. Chicago, at Chicago (8 innings)               5-5
Oct. 15, Chicago vs. St. Louis, at St. Louis (6 innings) forfeited   5-4
Oct. 16, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at St. Louis                         7-4
Oct. 17, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at St.Louis                          3-2
Oct. 22, Chicago vs. St. Louis, at Pittsburg (7 innings)             9-2
Oct 23, Chicago vs. St. Louis, at Cincinnati                         9-2
Oct. 24, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at Cincinnati                       13-4

Total victories for Chicago, 3: for St. Louis, 3, with one game drawn
Total runs scored by Chicago, 43: by St. Louis, 41.


THE SERIES OF 1886.

In 1886 the Chicago and St. Louis club teams again won the championship
honors of their respective associations, and they again entered the lists
for the "world's championship," this series being best out of six games,
three being played at Chicago, and three at St. Louis; the winner of the
series taking ail the gate receipts. The result was the success of the St.
Louis team, the scores being as follows:

Oct. 18, Chicago vs. St. Louis, at Chicago                  6-0
Oct. 19, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at Chicago (8 innings)     12-0
Oct. 20, Chicago vs. St. Louis, at Chicago (8 innings)     11-4
Oct. 21, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at St. Louis (7 innings)    8-5
Oct. 22, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at St. Louis (6 innings)   10-3
Oct. 23, St. Louis vs. Chicago, at St. Louis (10 innings)   4-3

Total runs for St. Louis, 38; for Chicago, 29.


THE SERIES OF 1887.

In 1887 the world's championship series had become an established
supplementary series of contests, and in this year these contests excited
more interest than had previously been manifested in regard to them, the
demands made upon the two contesting teams--the Detroit champions of the
League and the St. Louis champions  of the American Association--for a
game of the series from the large cities of the East and West being such
as to lead the two clubs to extend the series to one of best out of
fifteen games. These were played at St. Louis, Detroit, Chicago, and
Pittsburg in the W st, and at New York, Brooklyn, Boston, Philadelphia,
and Baltimore in the East. The series began in St. Louis, and the eighth
victory of the Detroits was won at Baltimore, St. Louis winning the last
game of the series at St. Louis. The record of the fifteen games, showing
the pitchers in each contest, is as follows:

Date.  |Contesting   |Cities.     |Pitchers.     |Innings.|Score.
       |Clubs.       |            |              |        |
-------+-------------+------------+--------------+--------+------
Oct. 10|St. Louis v. |St. Louis   |Carruthers,   |      9 |  6-1
       | Detroit     |            |Getzein       |        |
 "   11|Detroit v.   |St. Louis   |Conway, Foutz |      9 |  5-3
       | St. Louis   |            |              |        |
 "   12| "    "    " |Detroit     |Getzein,      |     13 |  2-1
       |             |            |Carruthers    |        |
 "   13| "    "    " |Pittsburg   |Baldwin, King |      9 |  8-0
 "   14|St. Louis v. |Brooklyn    |Carruthers,   |      9 |  5-2
       | Detroit     |            |Conway        |        |
 "   15|Detroit v.   |New York    |Getzein, Foutz|      9 |  9-0
       | St. Louis   |            |              |        |
 "   17|"    "     " |Philadelphia|Baldwin,      |      9 |  3-1
       |             |            |Carruthers    |        |
 "   18| "    "    " |Boston      |Baldwin,      |      9 |  9-2
       |             |            |Carruthers    |        |
 "   19| "    "    " |Philadelphia|Conway, King  |      9 |  4-2
 "   21|St. Louis v. |Washington  |Carruthers,   |      9 | 11-4
   [1] | Detroit     |            |Getzein       |        |
 "   21|Detroit v.   |Baltimore   |Baldwin, Foutz|      9 | 13-3
   [2] | St. Louis   |            |              |        |
 "   22|"    "     " |Baltimore   |Baldwin, Foutz|      9 | 13-3
 "   24|"    "     " |Detroit     |Baldwin,      |      9 |  6-3
       |             |            |Carruthers    |        |
 "   25|"    "     " |Chicago     |Getzein, King |      9 |  4-3
 "   26|St. Louis v. |St. Louis   |Carruthers,   |      6 |  9-2
       | Detroit     |            |Baldwin       |        |
----------------------------------------------------------------
[Footnote 1: A.M.]
[Footnote 2: P.M.]


THE SERIES OF 1888.

The contest for the world's championship in 1888 was the most exciting
and important of any yet played; and the public attention given to the
series throughout the entire base ball world, was such as to show that it
would be a paying policy on the part of the League and the Association to
establish a supplementary championship season, to begin on the first of
October each year, the series of games to be played including not only
that for the world's championship, but also to include contests between
the other clubs of each organization so as to settle the question as to
which were the eight leading professional teams of the country.

Prior to 1888 but three clubs had participated in the regular series, and
these were: St. Louis on the one hand, and Chicago (twice) and Detroit on
the other. In 1888, however, a new League candidate entered the field
against the St. Louis champions, and that was the New York club team, it
being the first time the two clubs had ever encountered each other. The
series arranged between the two clubs was one of ten games, the first six
victories to decide the contest. They were commenced at the Polo Grounds
on October 16, and the opening contest gave promise of a very interesting
series of games, and when the St. Louis team "Chicagoed" their League
adversaries the next day the interest in the matches doubled. But the
close of the first week's games left New York in the van with a credit of
four victories out of the five games played. The contest of the 19th took
place in Brooklyn, but the other four were played at the Polo Grounds, the
largest attendance of the whole series being that of Saturday, Oct. 20,
when the receipts exceeded $5,000. At the four games played at the Polo
Grounds the aggregate of receipts was $15,405, while the aggregate of
receipts at the four games at St. Louis, was but $5,612, less than that at
the Saturday game at the Polo Grounds the previous week. The game at
Brooklyn was marred by the bad weather, while that at Philadelphia was
dampened by the lead the New York team had previously attained. The series
virtually ended at St. Louis on October 25, when New York won their sixth
victory and the championship. After that Ward left the New York team to
join the Australian tourists, and the interest in the games ended, the
receipts falling off from $2,365 on October 25 to $411 on October 26. The
last game of the series was a mere ordinary exhibition game, Titcomb
pitching in four innings and Hatfield in four. The player's game on the
28th was even less attractive, the St. Louis team winning easily by 6 to
0, Keefe, Welch and George taking turns in the box for New York. The
record of the series in full is as follows:


Date.  |Contesting   |Cities.   |Pitchers.   |In's.|Scr.  |Rec
       |Clubs.       |          |            |     |      |
-------+-------------+----------+------------+-----+------+
Oct 16 |N. York v.   |New York  |Keefe       |     |      |
       | St. Louis   |          |King        |   9 |  2-1 | $2,876
 "  17 |St. Louis v. |  "    "  |Chamberlain |     |      |
       | N. York     |          |Welch       |   9 |  3-0 |  3,375
 "  18 |N. York v.   |  "    "  |Keefe       |     |      |
       | St. Louis   |          |King        |   9 |  4-2 |  3,530
 "  19 | "    "    " |Brooklyn  |Crane       |     |      |
       |             |          |Chamberlain |   9 |  6-3 |  1,502
 "  20 | "    "    " |New York  |Keefe       |     |      |
       |             |          |King        |   8 |  6-4 |  5,624
 "  22 | "    "    " |Phild'l'a |Welch       |     |      |
       |             |          |Chamberlain |   8 | 12-5 |  1,781
 "  24 |St. Louis v. |St. Louis |King        |     |      |
       | N. York     |          |Crane       |   8 |  7-5 |  2,624
 "  25 |N. York v.   |  "    "  |King        |     |      |
       | St. Louis   |          |Chamberlain |   9 | 11-3 |  2,365
 "  26 |St. Louis v. |  "    "  |King        |     |      |
       | N. York     |          |George      |  10 | 14-11|    411
 "  27 | "    "    " |  "    "  |Chamberlain,|     |      |
       |             |          |Titcomb     |   9 | 18-7 |    212
                                    Hatfeld, |
-------+-------------+----------+------------+-----+------+------------
Total  |             |          |            |     |      | $24,362
Total Runs--New York, 64; St. Louis, 60.

Pitchers' Victories--Keefe, 4; Welch, 1; King, 2; Chamberlain, 2; Crane, 1.

Pitchers' Defeats--Keefe, 0; Welch, 1; Crane, 1; Titcomb, 1; King, 3;
Chamberlain, 3.


THE STATISTICS OF THE GAMES.

THE BATTING FIGURES.

The batting figures of those of the New York team who played in five
games and over, are as follows:

PLAYERS.   |Games.|A.B.|R. |B.H.|S.B.|Per ct.
           |      |    |   |    |    |B.H.
-----------+------+----+---+----+----+------
Ward       |    8 | 28 | 4 | 11 |  6 | .393
Ewing      |    7 | 26 | 5 |  9 |  5 | .346
Tiernan    |   10 | 38 | 8 | 13 |  5 | .342
O'Rourke   |   10 | 36 | 4 | 12 |  3 | .333
Whitney    |   10 | 37 | 7 | 11 |  3 | .297
Connor     |    7 | 24 | 7 |  6 |  4 | .250
Slattery   |   10 | 39 | 6 |  8 |  5 | .205
Richardson |    9 | 36 | 6 |  6 |  2 | .167
------------------------------------------

Of those who played in less than five games, the batting figures were as
follows:

PLAYERS. |Games.|A.B.|R. |B.H.|S.B.|Per cent.
         |      |    |   |    |    |B.H.
         |      |    |   |    |    |
---------+------+----+---+----+----+-----
Titcomb  |    1 |  4 | 1 |  1 |  O | .500
Gore     |    3 | 11 | 5 |  5 |  2 | .454
Brown    |    2 |  8 | 1 |  3 |  0 | .375
George   |    2 |  9 | 2 |  3 |  0 | .333
Welch    |    2 |  7 | 2 |  2 |  0 | .286
Hatfield |    2 |  8 | 2 |  2 |  1 | .250
Crane    |    2 |  7 | 2 |  2 |  0 | .143
Murphy   |    3 | 10 | 1 |  1 |  0 | .100
Keefe    |    4 | 11 | 2 |  2 |  0 | .090
------------------------------------------

Of those of the St. Louis team who took part in five games and over, the
batting figures were as follows:

PLAYERS.    |Games.|A.B.| R. |B.H.|S.B.|Per cent.
            |      |    |    |    |    |B.H.
------------+------+----+----+----+----+-------
Milligan    |    8 | 25 |  5 | 10 |  0 | .400
Comiskey    |   10 | 38 |  6 | 10 |  4 | .263
Robinson    |   10 | 38 |  7 | 10 |  2 | .263
O'Neil      |   10 | 38 |  9 | 10 |  0 | .263
McCarthy    |   10 | 41 | 10 | 10 |  4 | .244
Latham      |   10 | 41 | 10 |  9 | 10 | .219
White       |   10 | 35 |  4 |  5 |  1 | .143
Lyons       |    5 | 18 |  0 |  2 |  0 | .111
King        |    5 | 16 |  1 |  1 |  0 | .063
Chamberlain |    5 | 13 |  3 |  0 |  1 | .000
---------------------------------------------

Of those who played in less than five games, the batting figures were as
follows:

PLAYERS.|Games.|A.B.|R. |B.H.|S.B.|Per ct.
        |      |    |   |    |    |B.H.
--------+------+----+---+----+----+-------
Boyle   |    4 | 16 | 4 |  6 |  3 | .375
Herr    |    3 | 11 | 2 |  0 |  1 | .000
Devlin  |    1 |  3 | 0 |  0 |  0 | .000

THE PITCHERS' FIGURES

The pitchers' figures showing their work in the box, are as follows:

NEW YORK.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
PLAYERS. |Games.|At   |Runs.|Earned|Hits.|Totals.|Wild    |Struck |Bases
         |      |Bat. |     |Runs. |     |       |Pitches.|Out.   |on
         |      |     |     |      |     |       |        |       |Balls.
---------+------+-----+-----+------+-----+-------+--------+-------+-------
Keefe    |    4 | 123 |  10 |    2 |  18 |    19 |      0 |    32 |  9
Welch    |    2 |  56 |   8 |    2 |  10 |    14 |      1 |     3 |  6
Crane    |    2 |  62 |  10 |    3 |  14 |    17 |      3 |    12 |  6
         +------+-----+-----+------+-----+-------+--------+-------+----
Total    |    8 | 241 |  28 |    7 |  42 |    50 |      4 |    47 | 21
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

ST. LOUIS.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
PLAYERS.   |Games.|At   |Runs.|Earned|Hits.|Totals.|Wild    |Struck |Bases
           |      |Bat. |     |Runs. |     |       |Pitches.|Out.   |on
           |      |     |     |      |     |       |        |       |Balls.
-----------+------+-----+-----+------+-----+-------+--------+-------+-----
--
King       |    5 | 137 |  25 |    8 |  34 |    43 |      2 |    11 |   9
Chamberlain|    4 | 210 |  43 |   22 |  64 |    94 |      7 |    14 |  20
           +------+-----+-----+------+-----+-------+--------+-------+-----
---
Total      |   10 | 347 |  68 |   30 |  98 |   137 |      9 |    25 |  29
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
---

In the fielding figures of pitchers the assistances on strikes were mixed
up with the fielding assistances which rendered them useless.

The record of the batting and fielding of the two club teams as a whole,
is as follows:

CLUB BATTING.
CLUBS.    |Games.|At Bat.|Runs.|Base |S.B.|Average.
          |      |       |     |Hits.|    |
----------+------+-------+-----+-----+----+--------
New York  |   10 |  366  |  64 |  96 | 37 |  .289
St. Louis |   10 |  333  |  61 |  73 | 26 |  .219


CLUBS.    |Games | P.O. | A. | E.|Total   |Per Cent
          |      |      |    |   |Chances.|Accepted.
----------+------+------+----+---+--------+--------
New York  |   10 | 213  | 174| 40|     427|   .906
St. Louis |   10 | 249  | 157| 42|     449|   .906

THE FINANCIAL RECORD.

The appended figures showing the gate receipts of each day in
each city, are as follows:

Where Played.|When Played.         |Receipts.
-------------+---------------------+----------
New York City|Tuesday, October 16  |  $2,876.50
             |Wednesday, October 17|   3,375.50
             |Thursday, October 18 |   3,530.00
Brooklyn     |Friday, October 19   |   1,562.00
New York City|Saturday, October 20 |   5,624.50
Philadelphia |Monday, October 22   |   1,781.60
             |Wednesday, October 24|   2,024.00
St. Louis    |Thursday, October 25 |   2,365.00
             |Friday, October 26   |     411.00
             |Saturday, October 27 |     212.00
                                   +-----------
Total                              | $24,362.10
Total expenses                     |   8,000.00
Total amount divided               |  16,362.10
Fifty per cent. each amounted to   |   8,181.05

Of the New York's share of the receipts, $200 was paid to each of their
eighteen players, reducing the club's profits by some $3,600. The general
expense account includes traveling expenses and advertising for both
clubs. The following table shows the figures for the series between St.
Louis and Detroit in 1887:

RECEIPTS.--At St. Louis, $9,000; Detroit, $6,750; Pittsburgh, $2,300;
Brooklyn, $5,800; New York, $4,100; Philadelphia, $8,000; Washington,
$800; Boston, $3,100; Baltimore, $2,000; Chicago, $200; total $42,000. The
expenses of the trip was $18,000, leaving a balance of $24,000. This was
divided evenly, so that St. Louis received $12,000 and Detroit $12,000.

The St. Louis papers complimented the visiting New York team highly. In
fact, the St. Louis _Post-Dispatch_ said that no more gentlemanly
appearing or behaving set of men belonging to a ball club ever played in
St. Louis. Messrs. Von der Ahe and the secretary of his club, Mr. George
Munson, did everything in their power for the visiting newspaper men.

THE FIELDING FIGURES.

NEW YORK.
PLAYERS.   |Positions.|Games.|Fielding
           |          |      |Average.
-----------+----------+------+--------
Ewing      |C         |     7|   .875
Brown      |C         |     2|  1.000
Murphy     |C         |     3|   .759
Connor     |1B        |     7|   .975
Richardson |2B        |     9|   .978
Whitney    |3B        |    10|   .862
Ward       |S S       |     8|   .919
O'Rourke   |L F       |    10|   .955
Slattery   |C F       |    10|   .826
Tiernan    |R F       |    10|   .783

ST. LOUIS.
PLAYERS. |Positions.|Games.|Fielding
         |          |      |Average.
---------+----------+------+-------
Milligan |C         |     8|   .932
Comiskey |1B        |    10|   .966
Robinson |2B        |    10|   .891
Latham   |3B        |    10|   .923
White    |S S       |    10|   .796
O'Neill  |L F       |    10|   .885
Lyons    |C F       |     5|   .941
McCarthy |R F       |    10|   .765

THE AMERICAN PENNANT HOLDERS OF
1886, 1887 AND 1888.

An interesting chapter of American club history is the record made by the
four leading clubs of the Association in their games together during the
seasons of 1886, 1887 and 1888. In each year the St. Louis Club occupied
the leading position at the end of the season, while the other three
followed close after the champions. Here is the record of 1886:

1886.     |St. Louis.|Brooklyn.|Athletic.|Cincinnati.||Won.
----------+----------+---------+---------+-----------++-----
St. Louis |        --|       13|       15|         15||  43
Brooklyn  |         7|       --|       12|         13||  32
Athletic  |         5|        7|       --|         10||  22
Cincinnati|         5|        7|       10|         --||  22
          +----------+---------+---------+-----------++---
Lost      |        17|       27|       37|         38|| 119

It will be seen that while St. Louis led in 1886 Brooklyn stood second,
with the Athletics third, and Cincinnati fourth. The record of 1887 is
appended:

1887.      |Cincinnati.|Brooklyn.|Athletic.|St. Louis.||Won.
-----------+-----------+---------+---------+----------++-----
Cincinnati |         --|       12|       11|        13||  36
St. Louis  |          6|       --|       12|        16||  34
Athletic   |          9|        8|       --|         8||  25
Brooklyn   |          4|        4|       10|        --||  18
           +-----------+---------+---------+----------++---
Lost      |          19|       24|       33|        37|| 113

This year, though St. Louis won the pennant, it will be seen that in
their games together Cincinnati held the lead, the Athletics being second,
the St. Louis third and Brooklyn last, the season being a very hard one
for Brooklyn through the drinking habits of the players, which the
management failed to repress. The record for 1888 is as follows:

1888.      |Brooklyn.|St. Louis.|Athletic.|Cincinnati.||Won.
-----------+-----------+---------+---------+----------++-----
Brooklyn   |       --|        10|       12|         14||  36
St. Louis  |       10|        --|       10|          9||  29
Athletic   |        7|         8|       --|         10||  25
Cincinnati |        7|         6|       10|         --||  23
           +-----------+---------+---------+----------++-----
Lost       |       24|        24|       32|         33|| 113

Last season, it will be seen, that while St. Louis again won the pennant,
in their games together Brooklyn took the lead, St. Louis being second,
the Athletics third, and Cincinnati last.


EAST vs. WEST.

THE LEAGUE GAMES.

The contests between the four clubs of the East and the four of the West
in the League in 1888 ended in favor of the East, as will be seen by the
appended record:

EAST VS. WEST.


CLUBS.      |   |   |   | I ||    | G |
            |   |   |   | n ||    | a |
            |   |   | P | d ||    | m | P
            |   |   | i | i || G  | e | e
            |   |   | t | a || a  | s | r
            | C | D | t | n || m  |   | c
            | h | e | s | a || e  | P | e
            | I | t | b | p || s  | l | n
            | c | r | u | o ||    | a | t
            | a | o | r | l || W  | y | a
            | g | i | g | i || o  | e | g
            | o | t | h | s || n  | d | e
            | . | . | . | . || .  | . | .
------------+---+---+---+---++----+---+---
Philadelphia| 10|  7| 14| 13||  44| 73|.693
New York    |  8| 11| 10| 14||  43| 73|.589
Boston      |  7| 10| 10| 11||  38| 75|.567
Washington  |  6|  7|  9|  8||  30| 76|.359
            ----+---+---+---++----+---+
Games lost  | 31| 35| 43| 46|| 155|297|

WEST VS. EAST.

CLUBS.      | P |   |   |   ||    | G |
            | h |   |   |   ||    | a |
            | i |   |   | W ||    | m | P
            | l |   |   | a || G  | e | e
            | a | N |   | s || a  | s | r
            | d | e |   | h || m  |   | c
            | e | w | B | i || e  | P | e
            | l |   | o | n || s  | l | n
            | p | Y | s | g ||    | a | t
            | h | o | t | t || W  | y | a
            | i | r | o | o || o  | e | g
            | a | k | n | n || n  | d | e
            | . | . | . | . || .  | . | .
------------+---+---+---+---++----+---+-----
Chicago     |  8| 11| 12| 13||  44| 76|.587
Detroit     | 11|  7|  8| 11||  37| 72|.614
Pittsburg   |  6|  1|  8| 10||  31| 74|.419
Indianapolis|  4|  5|  9| 12||  30| 76|.305
            +---+---+---+---++----+---+
Games lost  | 29| 30| 37| 46|| 142|297|

It will be seen that the four Eastern clubs won 155 victories to 142 by
the four Western clubs.

THE AMERICAN GAMES.

The struggle between the East and the West in the American arena in 1888
resulted as follows:

EAST VS. WEST.

CLUBS.    |   |   | K |   ||    |  G |
          |   | C | a | L ||    |  a |
          | S | i | n | o ||    |  m | P
          | t | n | s | u || G  |  e | e
          | . | c | a | i || a  |  s | r
          |   | i | s | s || m  |    | c
          | L | n |   | v || e  |  P | e
          | o | n | C | i || s  |  l | n
          | u | a | i | l ||    |  a | t
          | i | t | t | l || W  |  y | a
          | s | i | y | e || o  |  e | g
          | . | . | . | . || n  |  d | e
          |   |   |   |   || .  | .  | .
----------+---+---+---+---++----+----+-----
Athletic  |  7| 10| 14| 15||  46|  74|.622
Brooklyn  | 10| 14| 11| 13||  48|  80|.600
Baltimore |  6|  6| 11| 11||  34|  79|.430
Cleveland |  4|  7| 10|  9||  30|  73|.411
          +---+---+---+---++----+----+
Games lost| 27| 37| 40| 48|| 158| 306|


WEST VS. EAST.

CLUBS.      |   |   |   |   ||    | G  |
            |   |   |   |   ||    | a  |
            |   |   |   |   ||    | m  | P
            |   |   | B | C || G  | e  | e
            | A | B | a | l || a  | s  | r
            | t | r | l | e || m  |    | c
            | h | o | t | v || e  | P  | e
            | l | o | i | e || s  | l  | n
            | e | k | m | l ||    | a  | t
            | t | l | o | a || W  | y  | a
            | i | y | r | n || o  | e  | g
            | c | n | e | d || n  | d  | e
            | . | . | . | . || .  | .  | .
------------+---+---+---+---++----+----+-----
St. Louis   | 10| 10| 14| 16||  50|  77|.649
Cincinnati  | 10|  6| 14| 10||  40|  77|.519
Kansas City |  3|  9|  8|  9||  29|  75|.387
Louisville  |  5|  7|  9|  8||  29|  77|.377
            +---+---+---+---++----+----+-----
Games lost  | 28| 32| 45| 43|| 148| 306|

It will be seen that the East won by 158 to 148.


PHENOMENAL CONTEST.

The most noteworthy contest of the season in the League championship
arena in 1888, was the game played at the Polo Grounds on September 4,
between the New York and Philadelphia teams. In this game eleven innings
had been completed without either side being able to score a single run
when sunset obliged the umpire to call the game on account of darkness.
The turnstile count showed that 9,505 people had passed through the gates.

It was a pitchers' contest from start to finish, both Keefe and Sanders
doing great work in the curving line. But ten base hits were made in the
eleven innings, six against Sanders and but four against Keefe. O'Rourke,
Richardson and Andrews led the little batting that was done.

The fielding play was of a phenomenal order, brilliant stops, catches and
throws occurring in every inning, and being loudly applauded.

The Philadelphians all but had the game in the tenth inning, but over
anxiety lost them the chance. Farrar was on third and might have scored on
Mulvey's fly to Slattery. He left the base, however, before the ball was
caught, and was promptly declared out. The score was:

NEW YORK.
              | T.| R.| B.| P.| A.| E.
--------------+---+---+---+---+---+---
Slattery, cf  |  5|  0|  0|  1|  1| 0
Ewing, c      |  5|  0|  0|  8|  3| 0
Tiernan, rf   |  5|  0|  0|  1|  0| 0
Connor, 1b    |  3|  0|  0| 15|  0| 0
Ward, ss      |  4|  0|  0|  2|  3| 1
Richardson, 2b|  4|  0|  2|  3|  2| 0
Whitney, 3b   |  3|  0|  1|  1|  5| 1
O'Rourke, lf  |  4|  0|  2|  1|  1| 0
Keefe, p      |  4|  0|  1|  1| 10| 0
              +---+---+---+---+---+---
Totals        | 37|  0|  6| 33| 25| 2

PHILADELPHIA.
             | T.| R.| B.| P.| A.| E.
-------------+---+---+---+---+---+---
Andrew, 3 cf |  5|  0|  2|  1|  0| 0
Fogarty, rf  |  4|  0|  1|  1|  0| 0
Farrar, 1b   |  4|  0|  0| 12|  1| 0
Delahanty, lf|  4|  0|  0|  2|  0| 0
Mulvey, 3b   |  4|  0|  0|  0|  2| 0
Sanders, p   |  4|  0|  0|  1|  7| 0
Schriver, c  |  4|  0|  1|  9|  4| 0
Irwin, ss    |  4|  0|  0|  5|  4| 0
Bastian, 1b  |  3|  0|  0|  2|  3| 0

             +---+---+---+---+---+---
Totals       | 36|  0|  4| 33| 18| 0


Philadelphia      0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0--0
NewYork           0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0--0

Two-base hit--O'Rourke. Double plays--Keefe and Connor, Farrar and
Sanders. First base on balls--Connor, Whitney, Bastain. First base on
errors--Philadelphia, 1. Struck out--Tiernan, Whitney, Keefe, 2; Andrews,
Fogarty, 2: Delehanty, Mulvey, Sanders, Schriver, Irwin. Wild pitches--
Keefe, 2; Sanders, 1. Time--Two hours. Umpire--Kelly.

REMARKABLE EVENTS.

LONGEST GAME.--Played at Boston May 11, 1877, between the Harvard College
nine and the Manchester professional team, twenty-four innings, score 0 to
0.

BEST LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP MATCH.--Played August 17, 1882, at Providence,
between the Providence and Detroit teams, eighteen innings, score 1 to 0--
_seventeen innings without a run!_

NEXT BEST LEAGUE CLUB GAME.--Played at St. Louis on May 1, 1877, between
the St. Louis team and the Syracuse Stars, fifteen innings, score 0 to 0--
a drawn match.

BEST INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION GAME.--Played May 7, 1878, at Lynn, Mass.,
between the Live Oak team of Lynn, and the Crickets of Binghamton, fifteen
innings, score 1 to 0.

BEST JUNIOR GAME.--Played at Hoboken, August 19, 1878, fifteen innings,
score 1 to 0.

SHORTEST GAME.--Excelsior vs. Field in Brooklyn on Excelsior's grounds,
in May, 1861--50 minutes, 9 innings.

LONGEST THROW.--By John Hatfield, made at Union Grounds, Brooklyn, Oct.
15, 1872. Distance 133 yards, 1 foot, 7 inches-- over 400 feet.

GREATEST SCORE.--In match between the Niagara Club, of Buffalo, and a
visiting nine at Buffalo in 1864, score 202 to 26.

THE THROWING CONTESTS RECORDS.

The longest throw of a baseball on record up to 1872 was that made in
1868 by John Hatfield, then a member of the Cincinnati team, he then
throwing a ball 132 yards. In October, 1872, a throwing contest took place
on the old Union ball grounds, Brooklyn, in which John Hatfield--then of
the Mutuals--threw the ball 133 yds, 1 ft 7-1/2 in., the distance being
officially measured. The contest was also participated in by Andy Leonard,
whose record was 119 yds. 1 ft. 10 in.; George Wright, 117 yds. 1 ft. 1
in.; Billy Boyd, 115 yds. 1 ft. 7 in.; Fisler, 112 yds. 6 in., and Anson,
110 yds. 6 in. This throw of Hatfield's--over 400 ft.--has never been
equaled in any regular throwing contest.

On September 9, 1882, a throwing match took place on the Chicago ball
grounds between E. Williamson of the Chicago Club and Pfeffer of the
Troys. Three trials were had and Pfeffer's best throw was 132 yards and 5
inches. Williamson's best throw was 132 yards, 1 foot, or four feet seven
and one half inches short of Hatfield's champion throw.

In 1884, while connected with the Boston Union Association Club, Ed
Crane, while in Cincinnati October 12 of that year, was credited with
throwing a baseball 135 yards, 1 foot, and 1/2 inch, and also again at St.
Louis on October 19, he was credited with throwing a ball 134 yards, 5
inches. But the circumstances attendant upon both trials were not such as
to warrant an official record, so the _Clipper_ says, through its editor
for 1888, Mr. A. H. Wright, in his answer to a query on the subject. At
any rate, Crane has not since reached such figures, and he is as swift a
thrower now as ever.

The throwing contest which took place at Cincinnati in 1888, at intervals
through the summer and fall, failed to result in the record being beaten,
though some very good long distance throwing  was done, as will be seen by
the appended record:

Rank| PLAYERS.   |CLUB.      | Distance Thrown.
----+------------+-----------+------------------
 1  | Williamson |Chicago    | 399 feet 11 inches.
 2  | Griffin    |Baltimore  | 372   "   8    "
 3  | Stovey     |Athletic   | 369   "   2    "
 4  | Vaughn     |Louisville | 366   "   9    "
 5  | Burns      |Brooklyn   | 364   "   6    "
 6  | O'Brien    |Brooklyn   | 361   "   5    "
 7  | Collins    |Brooklyn   | 354   "   6    "
 8  | Tebeau     |Cincinnati | 353   "   0    "
 9  | Gilks      |Cleveland  | 343   "  11    "
10  | Reilly     |Cincinnati | 341   "   6    "
11  | Brennan    |Kansas City| 339   "   6    "
12  | Stricker   |Cleveland  | 337   "   8    "
13  | Foutz      |Brooklyn   | 335   "   4    "
14  | Davis      |Kansas City| 333   "   6    "
15  | O'Connor   |Cincinnati | 330   "   0    "
16  | McTamany   |Kansas City| 327   "   6    "

When Williamson threw, the grounds were slippery, but he managed to
easily win the $100 prize money and diamond locket. One hundred and thirty-
three yards eight inches, was the distance Williamson threw, and he would
have done still better and beaten Hatfield's throw, had the conditions
been more favorable.

The best throw of a cricket ball on record is that of W. F. Torbes, of
Eton College, England, in March, 1876, the distance foeing 132 yards.

The longest throw of a lacrosse ball is that made by W. B. Kenny, at
Melbourne, Australia, in September, 1886, the ball being thrown from his
lacrosse stick 446 feet. The longest in America was that of Ross McKenzie,
in Montreal, on October, 1882, he throwing the ball 422 feet.

THE TRIP TO ENGLAND IN 1874.

Mr. Spalding made an effort to introduce base ball in England in 1874,
but the experiment proved to be a costly one financially, and it did not
result favorably in popularizing the American game in England. The two
teams who visited England in July, 1874, included the following players of
the Boston and Athletic clubs of that year:

BOSTON.            POSITIONS.     ATHLETIC.
-------------------------------------------------
James White        Catcher       James E. Clapp.
A.G. Spalding     Pitcher       James D. McBride.
James O'Rourke     First Base    West D. Fisler.
Ross C. Barnes     Second Base   Joseph Battin.
Henry Shafer       Third Base    Edward B. Sutton.
George Wright      Short Stop    M.H. McGeary.
And. J. Leonard    Left Field    Albert W. Gedney.
Harry Wright       Center Field  James F. McMullen.
Col. C. McVey      Right Field   A.C. Arisen.
George W. Hall     Substitute    Al. J. Reach.
Thomas L. Beals    Substitute    J.P. Sensenderfer.
Sam Wright, Jr     Substitute   Thomas Murnan.[A]

[**Proofreaders note A: "Murnan" might be a typo, as it appears as
"Murnam" later on the page.]

The record of the games played in England on the trip is as follows:

DATE.  |CONTESTING CLUBS.  |CITIES.   |PITCHERS. |SCORES.
-------+-------------------+----------+----------+-------
July 30|Athletic vs. Boston|Liverpool |McBride,  |
       |                   |          |Spalding  |
       |                   |          |10in.     | 14-11
 "   31|Boston vs. Athletic|   "      |Spalding, |
       |                   |          |McBride   | 23-18
Aug. 1 |Athletic vs. Boston|Manchester|McBride,  |
       |                   |          |Spalding  | 13-12
 "   3 |Boston vs. Athletic|London    |Spalding, |
       |                   |          |McBride   |  24-7
 "   6 |   "     "     "   |    "     |Spalding, |
       |                   |          |McMullen  | 14-11
 "   8 |Athletic vs. Boston|Richmond  |McBride,  |
       |                   |          |Spalding  |  11-3
 "   10|Boston vs. Athletic|Crystal   |Spalding, |
       |                   | Pal.     |McBride   |  17-8
 "   11|Athletic vs. Boston|   "      |McBride,  |
       |                   |          |Spalding  |  19-8
 "   13|Boston vs. Athletic|Kensington|Spalding, |
       |                   |          |McBride   |  16-6
 "   14|Spalding's Nine vs.|    "     |Spalding, |
       |McMullen's Nine    |          |McMullen  | 14-11
 "   15|Boston vs. Athletic|Sheffield |  "   , " |  19-8
 "   17| "     "     "     |   "      |  "   , " | 18-17
 "   20|Athletic vs. Boston|Manchester|McBride,  |
       |                   |          |Spalding  |   7-2
 "   24|Boston vs. Athletic|Dublin    |Spalding, |
       |                   |          |McBride   |  12-7
 "   25|Athletic vs. Boston|    "     |McMullen, |
       |                   |          |H. Wright |  13-4

Boston victories 8, Athletic victories 6.

In the percentage of base hits of those who played in a majority of the
games on the Boston side McVey led with .435, Leonard being second, with
.418, and George Hall third, with .364, Barnes, O'Rourke, Schafer, Harry
and George Wright and Spalding following in order. On the Athletic side
Anson led with .437, McGeary being second, with .388, and McMullen third,
with .367. McBride, Clapp, Murnam, Sutter, Gedner and Battin following in
order, the latter having a percentage of .323. Sensenderfer only played in
9 games, Kent in 8, Fisler in 5, and Beals in 4. All the others played in
10 games and over.

In the description of the players of the team given in the London papers
at the time of their visit the following paragraph appeared, quoted from
Mr. Chadwick's comments in the _Clipper_:

"Spalding is justly regarded as one of the most successful of the
strategic class of pitchers. In judgment, command of the ball, pluck,
endurance, and nerve, in his position he has no superior; while his
education and gentlemanly qualities place him above the generality of base-
ball pitchers. As a batsman he now equals the best of what are called
'scientific' batsmen--men who use their heads more than their muscle in
handling the ash. His force in delivery is the success with which he
disguises a change of pace from swift to medium, a great essential in
successful pitching. Spalding is a thorough representative of the spirited
young men of the Western States, he being from Illinois."

Of George Wright the same writer said: "George Wright is generally
regarded as a model base-ball player, especially in his responsible
position of short-stop; and until he injured his leg he had no equal in
the position. He is a jolly, good-natured youth full of life and spirit,
up to all the dodges of the game, and especially is he noted for his sure
catching of high balls in the infield, and for his swift and accurate
throwing. At the bat, too, he excels; while as a bowler, fielder, and
batsman, in cricket, he ranks with the best of American cricketers. He
comes of real old English stock, his father being a veteran English
cricketer, and formerly the professional of the St. George Cricket Club of
New York."

Besides the base-ball matches played during the tour, the following table
shows what the two clubs combined did on the cricket field, against the
strongest players of London, Sheffield, Manchester and Dublin. The sides
in each contest were eighteen Americans against twelve British cricketers:

           |AMERICANS vs.      |AMERICANS.     |OPPONENTS.
-----------+-------------------+----------------+------------
           |                   |1st.|2d. |Total|1st.|2d. ||Total
-----------+-------------------+----+----+-----+----+----++------
Aug. 3,4   |12 Marylebone      | 107| ---| 107 | 105| ---|| 105
           |Club on Ground at  |    |    |     |    |    ||
           |Lords              |    |    |     |    |    ||
Aug. 6,7   |11 Prince's C. C.  | 110| ---| 110 |  21|  39||  60
           |at Prince's        |    |    |     |    |    ||
Aug. 8     |13 Richmond C at   |  45| ---|  45 | 108| ---|| 108
           |Richmond[1]        |    |    |     |    |    ||
Aug. 13,14 |11 Surrey C. S. at | 100| 111| 211 |  27|   2||  29
           |Ovalt[2]           |    |    |     |    |    ||
Aug. 15,17 |12 Sheffield, at   | 130| ---| 130 |  43|  45||  88
           |Sheffield          |    |    |     |    |    ||
Aug. 20, 21|11 Manchester, at  | 121| 100| 221 |  42|  53||  95
           |Manchester         |    |    |     |    |    ||
Aug. 24, 25|11 All Ireland, at |  71|  94| 165 |  47|  32||  79
           |Dublin             |____|____|_____|____|____||____
           |Totals             | 684| 305| 989 | 393| 171 || 564

[Footnote 1: Unfinished innings, only six wickets down.]
[Footnote 2: Second innings unfinished, only four wickets down.]

The ball players did not lose a single game, and had the best of it in
the games which were drawn from not having time to put them out. The trip
cost the two clubs over $2,000, exclusive of the amount received at the
gate. In fact, the Britishers did not take to the game kindly at all.

To show what the All England eleven could do in the way of playing base
ball, the score of a game played in Boston in October,  1868, after the
All England eleven had played their cricket match there, is given below:

American Nine              3   2   0   0   1   6   3   5   0 ||  20
English Cricketers' Nine   4   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0 ||   4

George Wright pitched for the cricketers, the nine including Smith c;
Tarrant 1b; Peeley 2b; Shaw 3b; Humphrey ss; Jupp lf; Clarkwood cf, and
Rowbotham rf.

The American nine was a weak picked nine, including O'Brien--a Boston
cricketer--and Archy Buch, of Harvard, as the battery; Shaw, Barrows and
Lowell on the bases; Pratt as short stop, and Smith Rogers and Conant in
the out field.

In all the base-ball games in which the English professional cricketers
took part during their visits to America from 1859 to 1880, they failed to
begin to equal in their ball play the work done by the ball players in
cricket in England.

       *       *       *       *       *

THE GREAT BASE BALL TRIP AROUND THE
WORLD IN 1888-'89.

[Illustration: ALL AMERICA.
BROWN FOGARTY CARROLL WARD HEALY HANLON WOOD CRANE MANNING EARLE.]

[Illustration: CHICAGO TEAM.]

The greatest historical event recorded in the annals of the national game
was undoubtedly the journey to Australia, which began in November, 1888,
and ended in March, 1889, on a trip around the world. While in 1874 Mr. A.
G. Spalding was the _avant cornier_ of the visiting party of base ball
players to England,  and also one of the most prominent of the victorious
team players; in 1888 Mr. Spalding was the originator of the trip, the
master spirit of the remarkable enterprise, and the leader of the band of
base ball missionaries to the antipodes. Of course, in recording the
Australian trip in the GUIDE for 1889, only a cursory glance can be taken
of the trip, as it would require a volume of itself to do the tour
justice. Suffice it to say that the pluck, energy and business enterprise
which characterized the unequaled event reflected the highest credit not
only on Mr. Albert G. Spalding, as the representative spirit of Western
business men, but also on the American name in every respect, and it did
for the extension of the popularity of our national game in six short
months what as many years of effort under ordinary circumstances would
have failed to do.

The party of tourists which started on their journey to Australia on
October 20, 1888, met with an enthusiastic welcome on their route to San
Francisco, and in that city they were given a reception on their arrival
and a send-off on their departure for Australia, unequaled in the history
of the game on the Pacific coast. The record of the series of games played
by the two teams--Chicago and All America--en route to San Francisco and
while in that city, is appended:

DATE   |CLUBS.      |CITIES.       |PITCHERS.       |SCORE.
-------+------------+--------------+----------------+-------
Oct. 20|Chicago vs. |Chicago       |Spalding,       | 11--6
       |America.    |              |Hutchinson      |
 "   21|"     "    "|St. Paul      |Baldwin, Healy  |  8--5
 "   22|"     "    "|Minneapolis   |Baldwin, Duryca |  1--0
 "   22|America vs. |     "        |Van Haltren,    |  6--3
       |Chicago.    |              |Tener           |
 "   23|Chicago vs. |Cedar Rapids  |Tener,          |  6--5
       |America.    |              |Hutchinson      |
 "   24|America vs. |Des Moines    |Hutchinson,     |  3--2
       |Chicago.    |              |Baldwin.        |
 "   25|"     "    "|Omaha         |Healy, Ryan     | 12--2
 "   26|Chicago vs. |Hastings      |Baldwin,        |  8--4
       |America.    |              | Van Haltren    |
 "   27|"     "    "|Denver        |Tener, Healy    | 16--2
 "   28|America vs. |  "           |Crane, Baldwin  |  9--8
       |Chicago.    |              |                |
 "   29|Chicago vs. |Colorado      |Ryan, Healy     |  3--9
       |America.    |  Spr's       |                |
 "   31|America vs. |Salt Lake     |Crane, Tener    | 19--3
       |Chicago.    |  City        |                |
Nov.  1|"    "    " | "   "    "   |Healy, Baldwin  | 10--3
 "    4|"    "    " |San Francisco.| "       "      |  4--4
 "   11|"    "    " |  "      "    |Van Haltren,    |  9--6
       |            |              |Tener           |
 "   14|Chicago vs. |Los Angeles   |Baldwin, Healy  |  5--0
       |America.    |              |                |
 "   15|America vs. |  "     "     |Crane, Tener    |  7--4
       |Chicago.    |              |                |

The teams, when they left San Francisco on November 18, 1888, included
the following players:

CHICAGO TEAM.
A. C. Anson,      Capt. and 1st baseman.
N. F. Pfeffer,     2d baseman.
Thos. Burns,       3d baseman.
E. N. Williamson, .short stop.
M. Sullivan,       left fielder.
Jas. Ryan,         center fielder.
R. Pettitt,        right fielder.
Thos. P. Daly,     catcher.
J. K. Tener,      .pitcher.
M. Baldwin,        pitcher.

ALL AMERICA TEAM.
J. M. Ward,      Capt. and short stop.
G. A. Wood,     1st baseman.
H. C. Long,     2d baseman.
H. Manning,     3d baseman.
J. Fogarty,     left fielder.
E. Hanlon,      center fielder.
J. C. Earl,     right fielder.
F. H. Carroll,  catcher.
John Healy,     pitcher.
F. N. Crane,    pitcher.

Earl also acted as change catcher. The All America team included players
from the League clubs of New York, Philadelphia, Detroit, Pittsburg and
Indianapolis, and from the American Association clubs of Cincinnati and
Kansas City. Mr. Spalding stood at the head of the tourist party, with Mr.
Leigh S. Lynch as his business manager, and H. H. Simpson as assistant,
Mr. J. K. Tener being the treasurer and cashier.

The record of the games played by the two teams with outside clubs en
route to San Francisco and in California is as follows:

DATE.  |CLUBS.              |CITIES.      |PITCHERS.      |SCORE.
-------+--------------------+-------------+---------------+-------
Oct. 21|St. Paul vs. Chicago|St. Paul     |Duryea, Tener  |  8-5
Nov.  6|Haverly vs. America |San Francisco|Anderson, Crane| 12-5
 "    8|Chicago vs. Stockton|Stockton     |Tener, Harper  |  2-2
 "    8|Pioneer vs. America |San Francisco|Purcell, Healy |  9-4
 "    9|America vs. Stockton|Stockton     |Crane, Baker   | 16-1
 "   10|Chicago vs. Haverly |San Francisco|Baldwin Inal   |  6-1

While en route to Australia the tourists stopped at Honolulu, where they
were given a public reception, by King Kalakaua, but their first game
played after they had left California was at Auckland,  where they first
realized what a cordial reception the Australians had prepared for them.
On their arrival at Sydney, and afterward at Melbourne, the hearty welcome
accorded them, not only as ball players but as representatives of the
great Western Republic, was such as to surpass all their anticipations,
the heartiness of the greeting, the boundless hospitality and the crowded
attendance at their games imparting to their visit a brilliancy of success
which fully remunerated Mr. Spalding for all the pecuniary risks he had
incurred by the trip. It was originally intended to have made the tour of
the colonies a more extended one than was afterward found possible, and so
the sojourn of the players on the Australian continent ended sooner than
anticipated, only four cities being visited, instead of eight or ten, as
laid out. The record of the games played in Australia is as follows:

DATE.  |CLUBS.             |CITIES.  |PITCHERS.     |Score.
-------+-------------------+---------+--------------+-------
Dec. 10|Chicago vs. America|Auckland |Baldwin, Crane| 22-13
 "   15|America vs. Chicago|Sydney   |Healy, Tener  |   5-4
 "   17|   "     "     "   |   "     |Healy, Baldwin|   7-5
 "   18|   "     "     "   |   "     |Healy, Tener  |   6-3
 "   22|Chicago vs. America|Melbourne|Tener, Crane  |   5-3
 "   24|America vs. Chicago|    "    |Healy, Ryan   | 10-13
 "   26|   "     "    "    |Adelaide |Healy, Tener  | 19-14
 "   27|Chicago vs. America|    "    |Baldwin, Healy|  12-9
 "   28|   "     "    "    |    "    |Ryan, Simpson |  11-4
Dec. 29|America vs. Chicago|Ballarat |Healy, Baldwin|  11-7
Jan. 1 |Chicago vs. America|Melbourne|Tener, Healy  |  14-7
 "   1 |   "    "    "     |   "     |Baldwin, Crane|   9-4
 "   5 |   "    "    "     |   "     |Baldwin, Crane|   5-0
 "  26 |America vs. Chicago|Colombo  |Crane, Baldwin|   3-3

After leaving Australia the tourists called at Colombo, Ceylon, and from
thence went to Cairo, and while in that city visited the Pyramids, and
they managed to get off a game on the sands in front of the Pyramid Cheops
on Feb. 9. Their first game in Europe was played at Naples on Feb. 19, and
from there they went to Rome, Florence and Nice, the teams reaching Paris
on March 3. The record of their games in Europe is as follows:

DATE.  |CLUBS.             |CITIES. |PITCHERS.      |Score.
-------+-------------------+--------+---------------+-------
Feb.  9|America vs. Chicago|Ghiz eh |Healy, Tener   |  9-1
"    19|   "    "    "     |Naples  |Healy, Baldwin |  8-2
"    23|Chicago vs. America|Rome    |Tener, Crane   |  3-2
"    25|America vs. Chicago|Florence|Healy, Baldwin |  7-4
March 3|                   |Paris

In commenting on the physique of the American ball players, the editor of
the Melbourne _Argus_ says:

"Right worthy of welcome did those visitors appear-stalwarts every man,
lumps of muscle showing beneath their tight fitting jersey garments, and a
springiness in every movement which denoted grand animal vigor and the
perfection of condition. We could not pick eighteen such men from the
ranks of all our cricketers, and it is doubtful if we could beat them by a
draft from the foot ballers. If base ball has anything to do with building
up such physique we ought to encourage it, for it must evidently be above
and beyond all other exercises in one at least of the essentials of true
athletics."

The Melbourne _Sporteman_ in its report of the inaugural game in that
city, said: "The best evidence offered that Melbournites were pleased and
interested in the exhibition lies in the fact that the crowd of nearly ten
thousand people remained through not only nine but twelve innings of play,
and then many of them stayed to see a four inning game between the Chicago
team and a nine composed mainly of our local cricket players, who made a
very creditable show, considering the strength of the team they were
playing against, and the fact that they were almost utter strangers to
base ball. Not only did the spectators remain upon the ground but they
heartily applauded the heavy batting, the base running and base sliding
and the brilliant fielding executed by our Yankee visitors. Perhaps the
truest realization of just how difficult it is to play a finished game of
base ball was obtained by the cricketers who went in against the Chicagos.
A man may be able to guard a wicket with a degree of skill that would win
him wide fame in cricket circles, but when it comes to standing beside the
home plate of a base ball diamond, and mastering the terrific delivery of
an American professional pitcher, the average cricketer is compelled to
acknowledge the wide difference existing between the two positions. Then
again, the quick handling of a batted or thrown ball, that it may be
returned with all accuracy and lightning like rapidity to the waiting
basemen are points which our cricketers are deficient in, when compared
with the American professional ball player. It can be seen at a glance
that the game is prolific of opportunities for quick and brilliant
fielding."

The following is the score of the first match at cricket played by the
base ball tourists with Australian cricketers in Sydney on December 18,
1888:

BASE BALL EIGHTEEN.

Anson, b. Charlton                   15
Williamson, c. Woolcott, b. Charlton  0
Ward, b. Charlton                     1
Spalding, b. Charlton                 0
Wright, b. Gregory                   11
Pfeffer, b. Gregory                  16
Wood, b. Gregory                      0
Carroll, c. Robinson, b. Gregory      0
Earle, st. Crane, b. Gregory          0
Fogarty, b. Charlton                  0
Burns, b. Charlton                   10
Hanlon, hit wicket, b. Gregory        2
Manning, c. Woolcott, b. Gregory     14
Pettit, b. Gregory                    3
Ryan, c. Robinson, b. Gregory         3
Sullivan, c. Halligan, b. Gregory,    0
Baldwin, not out                      0
Sundries                              5
                                    ----
Total                                81

SYDNEY ELEVEN.

Robinson, l. b. w., b. Earle        1
Halligan, c. Burns, b. Anson       21
Kidman, c. Pfeffer, b. Anson       19
Woolcott, c. and b. Anson           4
Crane, c. Williamson b. Earle      14
A. Gregory, c. Burns, b. Wright    35
Hemsley, not out                   18
Sundries                            3
                                 -----
Total for six wickets             115

We are compelled to omit the National Agreement for want of space. It
will be given in the Official League Book.

 [Illustration: A. G. MILLS.]

Mr. A. G. Mills was connected with the Chicago Club at the organization
of the National League, and he participated in the legislative work of the
League from 1876 to 1885 when he resigned his position as President, to
which position he was unanimously elected on the death of President
Hulbert. To his efficient services as President and one of the Board of
Directors is the success of the League after the death of its founder
largely due. He was the originator of the National Agreement which has so
firmly bound together the National League and the American Association.
Since he resigned his position as President of the League in 1885, he has
been practically out of Base Ball, although he still takes a deep interest
in the game. He was succeeded by the worthy President, Mr. N. E. Young.


       *       *       *       *       *


  INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS

       *       *       *       *       *
                                                     RULE.
  The Ground                                            1
  The Infield                                           2
  The Bases                                             3
      Number of                                  (1)    3
      The Home Bases                             (2)    3
      First, Second and Third                    (3)    3
      Position                                   (4)    3
  Foul Lines                                            4
  Pitcher's Lines                                       5
  Catcher's Lines                                       6
  Captain's Lines                                       7
  Player's Lines                                        8
  Batman's Lines                                        9
  Three Feet Lines                                     10
  Lines must be Marked                                 11
  The Ball                                             12
      Weight and Size                            (1)   12
      Number Balls Furnished                     (2)   12
      Furnished by Home Club                     (3)   12
      Replaced if Injured                        (4)   12
  The Bat                                              13
      Material of                                (1)   13
      Shape of                                   (2)   13

  THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS.

  Number of Players in Game                            14
  Players' Positions                                   15
  Players not to Sit with Spectators                   16
  Club Uniforms                                        17
  The Pitcher's Position                               18
  The Batsman's Position                               19
  Order of Batting                                     20
      Where Players Must Remain                  (1)   20
      Space Reserved for Umpire                  (2)   20
      Space Allotted Players "at Bat"            (3)   20
  The Players' Benches                                 21

  THE GAME.

  Time of Championship Game                      (1)   22
  Number of Innings                              (2)   22
  Termination of Game                            (a)   22
  The Winning Run                                (b)   22
  A Tie Game                                           23
  A Drawn Game                                         24
  A Called Game                                        25
  A Forfeited Game                                     26
      Failure of the Nine to Appear              (1)   26
      Refusal of One Side to Play                (2)   26
      Failure to Resume Playing                  (3)   26
      Willful Violation                          (4)   26
      Disobeying Order to Remove Player          (5)   26
      Written Notice to President                (6)   26
  No Game                                              27
  Substitutes                                          28
      One or More Substitute Players             (1)   28
      Extra Player                               (2)   28
      Base Runner                                (3)   28
  Choice of Innings                                    29
  A Fair Ball                                          30
  An Unfair Ball                                       31
  A Balk                                               32
      Motion to Deceive                          (1)   32
      Delay by Holding                           (2)   32
      Pitcher Outside of Lines                   (3)   32
  A Dead Ball                                          33
  A Foul Strike                                        34
  Block Balls                                          35
      Stopped by Person Not in Game              (1)   35
      Ball Returned                              (2)   35
      Base Runner Must Stop                      (3)   35
  The Scoring of Runs                                  36
  A Fair Hit                                           37
  A Foul Hit                                           38
  Batted Ball Outside Grounds                          39
  A Fair Batted Ball                                   40
  Strikes                                              41
      Ball Struck at by Batsman                  (1)   41
      A Fair Ball Delivered by Pitcher           (2)   41
      Attempt to Make Foul Hit                   (3)   41
  A Foul Strike                                        42
  The Batsman is Out                                   43
      Failure to Take Position at Bat in Order   (1)   43
      Failure to Take Position Within One Minute
          after Being Called                     (2)   43
      If He Makes a Foul Hit                     (3)   43
      If He Makes a Foul Strike                  (4)   43
      Attempt to Hinder Catcher                  (5)   43
      Three Strikes Called by Umpire             (6)   43
      If Ball Hits Him while Making Third Strike (7)   43
      Attempted Foul Hit after Two Strikes       (8)   43
  The Batsman Becomes a Base Runner                    44
      After a Fair Hit                           (1)   44
      After Four Balls are Called                (2)   44
      After Three Strikes are Declared           (3)   44
  If Hit by Ball While at Bat                    (4)   44
  After Illegal Delivery of Ball                 (5)   44
Bases to be Touched                                    45
Entitled to Base                                       46
  If Umpire Call Four Balls                      (1)   46
  If Umpire Award Succeeding Batsman Base        (2)   46
  If Umpire Calls Balk                           (3)   46
  If Pitcher's Ball Passes Catcher               (4)   46
  Ball Strikes Umpire                            (5)   46
  Prevented from Making Base                     (6)   46
  Fielder Stops Ball                             (7)   46
Returning to Bases                                     47
  If Foul Tip                                     (1)  47
  If Foul Strike                                  (2)  47
  If Dead Ball                                    (3)  47
  Ball Thrown to Intercept Base Runner            (4)  47
Base Runner Out                                        48
  Attempt to Hinder Catcher from Fielding Ball    (1)  48
  If Fielder Hold Fair Hit Ball                   (2)  48
  Third Strike Ball Held by Fielder               (3)  48
  Touched with Ball after Three Strikes           (4)  48
  Touching First Base                             (5)  48
  Running from Home Base to First Base            (6)  48
  Running from First to Second Base               (7)  48
  Failure to Avoid Fielder                        (8)  48
  Touched by Ball While in Play                   (9)  48
  Fair or Foul Hit Caught by Fielder             (10)  48
  Batsman Becomes a Base Runner                  (11)  48
  Touched by Hit Ball before Touching Fielder    (12)  48
  Running to Base                                (13)  48
  Umpire Calls Play                              (14)  48
When Batsman or Base Runner is Out                     49
Coaching Rules                                         50

THE UMPIRE.

Umpire's Power                                     51, 52
  When Master of the Field                        (1)  52
  Must Compel Observance of Playing Rules         (2)  52
Special Duties                                         53
  Is Sole Judge of Play                           (1)  53
  Shall see Rules Observed Before Commencing Game (2)  53
  Must Keep Contesting Nines Playing              (3)  53
  Must Count and Call Balls                       (4)  53
Attention of Umpire is Directed Against                54
  Laziness or Loafing   ,                         (1)  54
  Seeking to Disconcert Fielder                   (2)  54
  Violation of Rules by Base Runner               (3)  54
  Umpire Must Call Play                                55
  Umpire Allowed to Call Time                          56
  Umpire is Empowered to Inflict Fines                 57
      For Indecent Language                      (1)   57
      Wilful Failure of Captain to Remain within Bounds
                                                 (2)   57
      Disobedience of a Player                   (3)   57
      Shall Notify Captain                       (4)   57
      Repetition of Offenses                     (5)   57

  FIELD RULES.

  No Club Shall Allow Open Betting                     58
  Who Shall be Allowed in the Field                    59
  Audience Shall Not be Addressed                      60
  Every Club Shall Furnish Police Force                61

  GENERAL DEFINITIONS.

  Play                                                 62
  Time                                                 63
  Game                                                 64
  An Inning                                            65
  A Time at Bat                                        66
  Legal                                                67
  Scoring                                              68
      Batting                                    (1)   68
      Runs Made                                  (2)   68
      Base Hits                                  (3)   68
      Sacrifice Hits                             (4)   68
      Fielding                                   (5)   68
      Assists                                    (6)   68
      Error                                      (7)   68
      Stolen Bases                               (8)   68
      Runs Earned                                (9)   68
  The Summary                                          69
      Number of Earned Runs                      (1)   69
      Number of Two Base Hits                    (2)   69
      Number of Three Base Hits                  (3)   69
      Number of Home Runs                        (4)   69
      Number of Stolen Bases                     (5)   69
      Number of Double and Triple Plays          (6)   69
      Bases on Called Balls                      (7)   69
      Bases from Being Hit                       (8)   69
      Men Struck Out                             (9)   69
      Passed Balls                              (10)   69
      Wild Pitches                              (11)   69
      Time of Game                              (12)   69
      Name of Umpire                            (13)   69
  Amendments                                           70

NATIONAL PLAYING RULES OF

Professional Base Ball Clubs

AS ADOPTED JOINTLY BY THE NATIONAL LEAGUE AND AMERICAN ASSOCIATION,
AND GOVERNING ALL CLUBS PARTIES TO THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT.


1889.

       *       *       *       *       *

THE BALL GROUND.

RULE 1. The Ground must be an enclosed field, sufficient in size to
enable each player to play in his position as required by these Rules.

RULE 2. The Infield must be a space of ground thirty yards square.

THE BASES.

RULE 3. The Bases must be

SEC. 1. Four in number, and designated as First Base, Second Base, Third
Base and Home Base.

SEC. 2. The Home Base must be of whitened rubber twelve inches square, so
fixed in the ground as to be even with the surface, and so placed in the
corner of the infield that two of its sides will form part of the
boundaries of said infield.

SEC. 3. The First, Second and Third Bases must be canvas bags, fifteen
inches square, painted white, and filled with some soft material, and so
placed that the center of the second base shall be upon its corner of the
infield, and the center of the first and third bases shall be on the lines
running to and from second base and seven and one-half inches from the
foul lines, providing that each base shall be entirely within the foul
lines.

SEC. 4. All the bases must be securely fastened in their positions, and
so placed as to be distinctly seen by the Umpire.

THE FOUL LINES.

RULE 4. The Foul Lines must be drawn in straight lines from the outer
corner of the Home Base, along the outer edge of the First and Third
Bases, to the boundaries of the Ground.

THE POSITION LINES.

RULE 5. The Pitcher's Lines must be straight lines forming the boundaries
of a space of ground, in the infield, five and one-half feet long by four
feet wide, distant fifty feet from the center of the Home Base, and so
placed that the five and one half feet lines would each be two feet
distant from and parallel with a straight line passing through the center
of the Home and Second Bases. Each corner of this space must be marked by
a flat iron plate or stone six inches square, fixed in the ground even
with the surface.

RULE 6. The Catcher's Lines must be drawn from the outer corner of the
Home Base, in continuation of the Foul Lines, straight to the limits of
the Ground back of Home Base.

RULE 7. The Captain's or Coacher's Lines must be a line fifteen feet from
and parallel with the Foul Lines, said lines commencing at a line parallel
with and seventy-five feet distant from the catcher's lines, and running
thence to the limits of the grounds.

RULE 8. The Players' Lines must be drawn from the Catcher's Lines to the
limits of the Ground, fifty feet distant from and parallel with, the foul
lines.

RULE 9. The Batsman's Lines must be straight lines forming the boundaries
of a space on the right, and of a similar space on the left of the Home
Base, six feet long by four feet wide, extending three feet in front of
and three feet behind the center of the Home Base, and with its nearest
line distant six inches from the Home Base.

RULE 10. The Three Feet Lines must be drawn as follows: From a point on
the Foul Line from Home Base to First Base, and equally distant from such
bases, shall be drawn a line on Foul Ground, at a right angle to said Foul
Line, and to a point three feet distant from it; thence running parallel
with said Foul Line, to a point three feet distant from the First Base;
thence in a straight line to the Foul Line, and thence upon the Foul Line
to point of beginning.

RULE 11. The lines designated in Rules 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 must be
marked with chalk or other suitable material, so as to be distinctly seen
by the Umpire. They must all be so marked their entire length, except the
Captain's and Player's Lines, which must be so marked for a distance of at
least thirty-five yards from the Catcher's Lines.

THE BALL.

RULE 12. The Ball.

SEC. 1. Must not weigh less than five or more than five and one-quarter
ounces avoirdupois, and measure not less than nine nor more than nine and
one-quarter inches in circumference. The Spalding League Ball, or the
Reach American Association Ball must be used in all games played under
these rules.

SEC. 2. For each championship game two balls shall be furnished by the
Home Club to the Umpire for use. When the ball in play is batted over the
fence or stands, on to foul ground out of sight of the players, the other
ball shall be immediately put into play by the Umpire. As often as one of
the two in use shall be lost, a new one must be substituted, so that the
Umpire may at all times, after the game begins, have two for use. The
moment the Umpire delivers the alternate ball to the catcher or pitcher it
comes into play, and shall not be exchanged until it, in turn, passes out
of sight on to foul ground.

SEC. 3. In all games the ball or balls played with shall be furnished by
the Home Club, and the last ball in play becomes the property of the
winning club. Each ball to be used in championship games shall be
examined, measured and weighed by the Secretary of the Association,
inclosed in a paper box and sealed with the seal of the Secretary, which
seal shall not be broken except by the Umpire in the presence of the
captains of the two contesting nines after play has been called.

SEC. 4. Should the ball become out of shape, or cut or ripped so as to
expose the yarn, or in any way so injured as to be--in the opinion of the
Umpire--unfit for fair use, the Umpire, on being appealed to by either
captain, shall at once put the alternate ball into play and call for a new
one.

THE BAT.

RULE 13. The Bat.

SEC. 1. Must be made wholly of wood, except that the handle may be wound
with twine or a granulated substance applied, not to exceed eighteen
inches from the end.

SEC. 2. It must be round, except that a portion of the surface may be
flat on one side, but it must not exceed two and one-half inches in
diameter in the thickest part, and must not exceed forty-two inches in
length.

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS.

RULE 14. The players of each club in a game shall be nine in number, one
of whom shall act as Captain, and in no case shall less than nine men be
allowed to play on each side.

RULE 15. The players' positions shall be such as may be assigned them by
their Captain, except that the Pitcher must take his position within the
Pitcher's Lines, as defined in Rule 5. When in position on the field, all
players will be designated "Fielders" in these rules.

RULE 16. Players in uniform shall not be permitted to seat themselves
among the spectators.

RULE 17. Every Club shall be required to adopt uniforms for its players,
and each player shall be required to present himself upon the field during
said game in a neat and cleanly condition, but no player shall attach
anything to the sole or heel of his shoes other than the ordinary base
ball shoe plate.

THE PITCHER'S POSITION.

RULE 18. The pitcher shall take his position facing the batsman with both
feet square on the ground, one foot on the rear line of the "box." He
shall not raise either foot, unless in the act of delivering the ball, nor
make more than one step in such delivery. He shall hold the ball, before
the delivery, fairly in front of his body, and in sight of the Umpire.
When the pitcher feigns to throw the ball to a base he must resume the
above position and pause momentarily before delivering the ball to the bat.

THE BATSMEN'S POSITION--ORDER OF BATTING.

RULE 19. The batsmen must take their positions within the Batsmen's
Lines, as defined in Rule 9, in the order in which they are named on _the
score_, which must contain the batting order of both nines, and be
submitted by the Captains of the opposing teams to the Umpire before the
game, and when approved by him THIS SCORE must be followed except in the
case of a substitute player, in which case the substitute must take the
place of the original player in the batting order. After the first inning
the first striker in each inning shall be the batsman whose name follows
that of the last man who has completed his turn--time at bat--in the
preceding inning.

RULE 20. SEC. 1. When their side goes to the bat the players must
immediately return to and seat themselves upon the players' bench and
remain there until the side is put out, except when batsman or base
runner. All bats not in use must be kept in the bat racks, and the two
players next succeeding the batsman, in the order in which they are named
on the score, must be ready with bat in hand to promptly take position as
batsman; provided, that the Captain and one assistant only may occupy the
space between the players' lines and the Captain's lines to coach base
runners.

SEC. 2. No player of the side at bat, except when Batsman, shall occupy
any portion of the space within the Catcher's Lines, as defined in Rule 6.
The triangular space behind the Home Base is reserved for the exclusive
use of the Umpire, Catcher and Batsman, and the Umpire must prohibit any
player of the side "at bat" from crossing the same at any time while the
ball is in the hands of, or passing between, the Pitcher and Catcher,
while standing in their positions.

SEC. 3. The players of the side "at bat" must occupy the portion of the
field allotted them, but must speedily vacate any portion thereof that may
be in the way of the ball, or of any Fielder attempting to catch or field
it.

PLAYERS' BENCHES.

RULE 21. The Players' Benches must be furnished by the home club, and
placed upon a portion of the ground outside the Players' Lines. They must
be twelve feet in length, and must be immovably fastened to the ground. At
the end of each bench must be immovably fixed a bat rack, with fixtures
for holding twenty bats; one such rack must be designated for the
exclusive use of the Visiting Club, and the other for the exclusive use of
the Home Club.

THE GAME.

RULE 22 SEC. I. Every Championship Game must be commenced  not later than
two hours before sunset.

SEC. 2. A Game shall consist of nine innings to each contesting  nine,
except that,

(a) If the side first at bat scores less runs in nine innings than the
other side has scored in eight innings, the game shall then terminate.

(b) If the side last at bat in the ninth inning scores the winning run
before the third man is out, the game shall terminate, upon the return of
the ball to the pitcher.

A TIE GAME.

RULE 23. If the score be a tie at the end of nine innings to each side,
play shall only be continued until the side first at bat shall have scored
one or more runs than the other side, in an equal number of innings, or
until the other side shall score one or more runs than the side first at
bat.

A DRAWN GAME.

RULE 24. A Drawn Game shall be declared by the Umpire when he terminates
a game on account of darkness or rain, after five equal innings have been
played, if the score at the time is equal on the last even innings played;
but if the side that went second to bat is then at the bat, and has scored
the same number of runs as the other side, the Umpire shall declare the
game drawn, without regard to the score of the last equal innings.

A CALLED GAME.

RULE 25 If the Umpire calls "Game" on account of darkness  or rain at any
time after five innings have been completed by both sides, the score shall
be that of the last equal innings played, unless the side second at bat
shall have scored one or more runs than the side first at bat, in which
case the score of the game shall be the total number of runs made.

A FORFEITED GAME.

RULE 26. A Forfeited Game shall be declared by the Umpire in favor of the
club not in fault, at the request of such club, in the following cases:

SEC. 1. If the nine of a club fail to appear upon the field, or being
upon the field, fail to begin the game within five minutes after the
Umpire has called "Play," at the hour appointed for the beginning of the
game, unless such delay in appearing or in commencing the game be
unavoidable.

SEC. 2. If, after the game has begun, one side refuses or fails to
continue playing, unless such game has been suspended or terminated by the
Umpire

SEC. 3. If, after play has been suspended by the Umpire, one side fails
to resume playing within five minutes after the Umpire has called "Play."

SEC. 4. If, in the opinion of the Umpire, any one of these rules is
willfully violated.

SEC. 5. If, after ordering the removal of a player, as authorized by Rule
57, Sec. 5, said order is not obeyed within five minutes.

SEC. 6. In case the Umpire declares a game forfeited, he shall transmit a
written notice thereof to the President of the  Association within twenty
four hours thereafter.

NO GAME.

RULE 27. "No Game" shall be declared by the Umpire if he shall terminate
play on account of rain or darkness, before five innings on each side are
completed.

SUBSTITUTES.

RULE 28. SEC. 1. In every championship game each team shall be required
to have present on the field, in uniform, at least one or more substitute
players.

SEC. 2. One player, whose name shall be printed on the score card as an
extra player, may be substituted at the end of any completed innings by
either club, but the player retired shall not thereafter participate in
the game In addition thereto a substitute  may be allowed at any time in
place of a player disabled in the game then being played, by reason of
illness or injury, of the nature and extent of which the Umpire shall be
the sole judge.

SEC. 3. The Base Runner shall not have a substitute run for him, except
by consent of the Captains of the contesting teams.

CHOICE OF INNINGS--CONDITION OF GROUND.

RULE 29. The choice of innings shall be given to the Captain of the Home
Club, who shall also be the sole judge of the fitness  of the ground for
beginning a game after rain.

THE DELIVERY OF THE BALL--FAIR AND UNFAIR BALLS.

RULE 30. A Fair Ball is a ball delivered by the Pitcher while standing
wholly within the lines of his position, and facing the batsman, the ball,
so delivered to pass over the home base, not lower than the batsman's
knee, nor higher than his shoulder.

RULE 31. An Unfair Ball is a ball delivered by the Pitcher, as in Rule
30, except that the ball does not pass over the Home Base, or does pass
over the Home Base above the batsman's shoulder, or below the knee.

BALKING.

RULE 32. A Balk is

SEC. 1. Any motion made by the Pitcher to deliver the ball to the bat
without delivering it, and shall be held to include any and every
accustomed motion with the hands, arms or feet, or position of the body
assumed by the Pitcher in his delivery of the ball, and any motion
calculated to deceive a base runner, except the ball be accidentally
dropped.

SEC. 2. The holding of the ball by the Pitcher so long as to delay the
game unnecessarily; or

SEC. 3. Any motion to deliver the ball, or the delivering the ball to the
bat by the Pitcher when any part of his person is upon ground outside of
the lines of his position, including all preliminary motions with the
hands, arms and feet.

DEAD BALLS.

RULE 33. A Dead Ball is a ball delivered to the bat by the Pitcher that
touches the Batsman's bat without being struck at, or any part of the
Batsman's person or clothing while standing in his position without being
struck at; or any part of the Umpire's person or clothing, while on foul
ground, without first passing the Catcher.

RULE 34. In case of a Foul Strike, Foul Hit ball not legally caught out,
Dead Ball, or Base Runner put out for being struck by a fair hit ball, the
ball shall not be considered in play until it is held by the Pitcher
standing in his position.

BLOCK BALLS.

RULE 35. SEC. 1. A Block is a batted or thrown ball that is stopped or
handled by any person not engaged in the game.

SEC. 2. Whenever a Block occurs the Umpire shall declare it, and Base
Runners may run the bases, without being put out, until the ball has been
returned to and held by the Pitcher standing in his position.

SEC. 3. In the case of a Block, if the person not engaged in the game
should retain possession of the ball, or throw or kick it beyond the reach
of the Fielders, the Umpire should call "Time," and require each base
runner to stop at the last base touched by him until the ball be returned
to the Pitcher standing in his position.

THE SCORING OF RUNS.

RULE 36. One Run shall be scored every time a Base Runner, after having
legally touched the first three bases, shall touch the Home Base before
three men are put out. If the third man is forced out, or is put out
before reaching First Base, a run shall not be scored.

THE BATTING RULES.

RULE 37. A Fair Hit is a ball batted by the batsman, standing in his
position, that first touches the ground, the First Base, the Third Base,
any part of the person of a player, Umpire, or any other object that is in
front of or on either of the Foul Lines, or batted directly to the ground
by the Batsman, standing in his position, that (whether it first touches
Foul or Fair Ground) bounds or rolls within the Foul Lines, between Home
and First, or Home and Third Bases, without interference by a player.

RULE 38. A Foul Hit is a ball batted by the Batsman, standing in his
position, that first touches the ground, any part of the person of a
player, or any other object that is behind either of the Foul Lines, or
that strikes the person of such Batsman, while standing in his position,
or batted directly to the ground by the Batsman, standing in his position,
that (whether it first touches Foul or Fair Ground) bounds or rolls
outside the Foul Lines, between Home and First or Home and Third Bases,
without interference by a player. Provided, that a Foul Hit not rising
above the Batsman's head and caught by the Catcher playing within ten feet
of the Home Base, shall be termed a Foul Tip.

BALLS BATTED OUTSIDE THE GROUNDS.

RULE 39. When a batted ball passes outside the grounds, the Umpire shall
decide it Fair should it disappear within, or Foul should it disappear
outside of the range of the Foul Lines, and Rules 37 and 38 are to be
construed accordingly.

RULE 40. A Fair batted ball that goes over the fence at a less distance
than two hundred and ten feet from Home Base shall entitle the Batsman to
two bases and a distinctive line shall be marked on the fence at this
point.

STRIKES.

RULE 41. A Strike is

SEC. 1. A ball struck at by the Batsman without its touching his bat; or

SEC. 2. A fair ball, legally delivered by the Pitcher, but not struck at
by the Batsman.

SEC. 3. Any obvious attempt to make a foul hit.

RULE 42. A foul strike is a ball batted by the Batsman when any part of
his person is upon ground outside the lines of the Batsman's position.

THE BATSMAN IS OUT.

RULE 43. The Batsman is out:

SEC. 1. If he fails to take his position at the bat in his order of
batting, unless the error be discovered and the proper Batsman takes his
position before a fair hit has been made, and in such case the balls and
strikes called must be counted in the time at bat of the proper Batsman:
_Provided_, this rule shall not take effect unless _the out_ is declared
before the ball is delivered to the succeeding Batsman.

SEC. 2. If he fails to take his position within one minute after the
Umpire has called for the Batsman.


SEC. 3. If he makes a foul hit, other than a foul tip as defined in Rule
38 and the ball be momentarily held by a Fielder before touching the
ground, provided it be not caught in a Fielder's hat or cap, or touch some
object other than a Fielder before being caught.

SEC. 4. If he makes a foul strike.

SEC. 5. If he attempts to hinder the Catcher from fielding the ball,
evidently without effort to make a fair hit.

SEC. 6. If, while the first base be occupied by a base runner, three
strikes be called on him by the Umpire, except when two men are already
out.

SEC. 7. If, while making the third strike, the ball hits his person or
clothing.

SEC. 8. If, after two strikes have been called, the Batsman obviously
attempts to make a foul hit, as in Section 3, Rule 41.

BASE RUNNING RULES.

WHEN THE BATSMAN BECOMES A BASE RUNNER.

RULE 44. The Batsman becomes a Base Runner:

SEC. 1. Instantly after he makes a fair hit.

SEC. 2. Instantly after four Balls have been called by the Umpire.

SEC. 3. Instantly after three strikes have been declared by the Umpire.

SEC. 4. If, while he be a Batsman, his person or clothing be hit by a
ball from the pitcher, unless--in the opinion of the Umpire--he
intentionally permits himself to be so hit.

SEC. 5. Instantly after an illegal delivery of a ball by the pitcher.

BASES TO BE TOUCHED.

RULE 45. The Base Runner must touch each Base in regular  order, viz.:
First, Second, Third and Home Bases; and when obliged to return (except on
a foul hit) must retouch the base or bases in reverse order. He shall only
be considered as holding a base after touching it, and shall then be
entitled to hold such base until he has legally touched the next base in
order, or has been legally forced to vacate it for a succeeding Base
Runner.

ENTITLED TO BASES.

RULE 46. The Base Runner shall be entitled, without being put out, to
take one Base in the following cases:

SEC. 1. If, while he was Batsman, the Umpire called four Balls.

SEC. 2. If the Umpire awards a succeeding Batsman a base on four balls,
or for being hit with a pitched ball, or in case of an illegal delivery--
as in Rule 44, Sec. 5--and the Base Runner is thereby forced to vacate the
base held by him.

SEC. 3. If the Umpire calls a "balk."

SEC. 4. If a ball delivered by the Pitcher pass the Catcher and touch the
Umpire or any fence or building within ninety feet of the Home Base.

SEC. 5. If upon a fair hit the Ball strikes the person or clothing of the
Umpire on fair ground.

SEC. 6. If he be prevented from making a base by the obstruction of an
adversary.

SEC. 7. If the Fielder stop or catch a batted ball with his hat or any
part of his dress.

RETURNING TO BASES.

RULE 47. The Base Runner shall return to his Base, and shall be entitled
to so return without being put out.

SEC. 1. If the Umpire declares a Foul Tip (as defined in Rule 38) or any
other Foul Hit not legally caught by a Fielder.

SEC. 2. If the Umpire declares a Foul Strike.

SEC. 3. If the Umpire declares a Dead Ball, unless it be also the fourth
Unfair Ball, and he be thereby forced to take the next base, as provided
in Rule 46, Sec. 2.

SEC. 4. If the person or clothing of the Umpire is struck by a ball
thrown by the Catcher to intercept a Base Runner.

WHEN BASE RUNNERS ARE OUT.

RULE 48. The Base Runner is out:

SEC. 1. If, after three strikes have been declared against him while
Batsman, and the Catcher fail to catch the third strike ball, he plainly
attempts to hinder the Catcher from fielding the ball.

SEC. 2. If, having made a Fair Hit while Batsman, such fair hit ball be
momentarily held by a Fielder, before touching the ground or any object
other than a Fielder. _Provided_, it be not caught in a Fielder's hat or
cap.

SEC. 3. If, when the Umpire has declared three strikes on him, while
batsman, the third strike ball be momentarily held by a Fielder before
touching the ground. _Provided_, it be not caught in a Fielder's hat or
cap, or touch some object other than a Fielder before being caught.

SEC. 4. If, after Three Strikes or a Fair Hit, he be touched with the
ball in the hand of a Fielder before such Base Runner touches First Base.

SEC. 5. If, after Three Strikes or a Fair Hit, the ball be securely held
by a Fielder, while touching First Base with any part of his person,
before such Base Runner touches First Base.

SEC. 6. If, in running the last half of the distance from Home Base to
First Base, he runs outside the Three Feet Lines, as defined in Rule 10;
except that he must do so if necessary to avoid a Fielder attempting to
field a batted ball, and in such case shall not be declared out.

SEC. 7. If, in running from First to Second Base, from Second to Third
Base, or from Third to Home Base, he runs more than three feet from a
direct line between such bases to avoid being touched by the ball in the
hands of a Fielder; but in case a Fielder be occupying the Base Runner's
proper path, attempting to field a batted ball, then the Base Runner shall
run out of the path and behind said Fielder, and shall not be declared out
for so doing.

SEC. 8. If he fails to avoid a Fielder attempting to field a batted ball,
in the manner prescribed in Sections 6 and 7 of this Rule; or if he, in
any way, obstructs a Fielder attempting to field a batted ball, or
intentionally interferes with a thrown ball: _Provided_, That if two or
more Fielders attempt to field a batted ball, and the Base Runner comes in
contact with one or more of them, the Umpire shall determine which Fielder
is entitled to the benefit of this Rule, and shall not decide the Base
Runner out for coming in contact with any other Fielder.

SEC. 9. If, at any time while the ball is in play, he be touched by the
ball in the hands of a Fielder, unless some part of his person is touching
a base he is entitled to occupy: _Provided_, The ball be held by the
Fielder after touching him; but (exception as to First Base), in running
to First Base, he may overrun said base without being put out for being
off said base, after first touching it, provided he returns at once and
retouches the base, after which he may be put out as at any other base.
If, in overrunning First Base, he also attempts to run to Second Base, or,
after passing the base he turns to his left from the foul line, he shall
forfeit such exemption from being put out.

SEC. 10. If, when a Fair or Foul Hit ball, other than a foul tip as
referred to in Rule 38, is legally caught by a Fielder, such ball is
legally held by a Fielder on the base occupied by the Base Runner when
such ball was struck (or the Base Runner be touched with the ball in the
hands of a Fielder), before he retouches said base after such Fair or Foul
Hit ball was so caught. _Provided_, That the Base Runner shall not be out
in such case, if, after the ball was legally caught as above, it be
delivered to the bat by the Pitcher before the Fielder holds it on said
base, or touches the Base Runner with it; but if the Base Runner in
attempting to reach a base, detaches it before being touched or forced out
he shall be declared safe.

SEC. 11. If, when a Batsman becomes a Base Runner, the First Base, or the
First and Second Bases, or the First, Second and Third Bases, be occupied,
any Base Runner so occupying a base shall cease to be entitled to hold it,
until any following Base Runner is put out and may be put out at the next
base or by being touched by the ball in the hands of a Fielder in the same
manner as in running to First Base, at any time before any following Base
Runner is put out.

SEC. 12. If a Fair Hit ball strike him _before touching the fielder_ and
in such case no base shall be run unless forced by the Batsman becoming a
Base Runner, and no run shall be scored.

SEC. 13. If when running to a base or forced to return to a base, he fail
to touch the intervening base or bases, if any, in the order prescribed in
Rule 45, he may be put out at the base he fails to touch, or by being
touched by the ball in the hands of a Fielder, in the same manner as in
running to First Base.

SEC. 14. If, when the Umpire calls "Play," after any suspension of a
game, he fails to return to and touch the base he occupied when "Time" was
called before touching the next base.

WHEN BATSMAN OR BASE RUNNER IS OUT.

RULE 49. The Umpire shall declare the Batsman or Base Runner out, without
waiting for an appeal for such decision, in all cases where such player is
put out in accordance with these rules, except as provided in Rule 48,
Sections 10 and 14.

COACHING RULES.

RULE 50. The Captains and Coachers are restricted in coaching to the Base
Runner only, and are not allowed to address any remarks except to the Base
Runner, and then only in words of necessary direction; and no player shall
use language which will in any manner refer to or reflect upon a player of
the opposing club, or the audience. To enforce the above, the Captain of
the opposite side may call the attention of the Umpire to the offence, and
upon a repetition of the same the club shall be debarred from further
coaching during the game.

THE UMPIRE.

RULE 51. The Umpire shall not be changed during the progress of a game,
except for reasons of illness or injury.

HIS POWERS AND JURISDICTION.

RULE 52. SEC. 1. The Umpire is master of the Field from the commencement
to the termination of the game, and is entitled to the respect of the
spectators, and any person offering any insult or indignity to him must be
promptly ejected from the grounds.

SEC. 2. He must compel the players to observe the provisions of all the
Playing Rules, and he is hereby invested with authority to order any
player to do or omit to do any act as he may deem necessary, to give force
and effect to any and all of such provisions.

SPECIAL DUTIES.

RULE 53. The Umpire's duties shall be as follows:

SEC. 1. The Umpire is the sole and absolute judge of play. In no instance
shall any person be allowed to question the correctness of any decision
made by him except the Captains of the contending nines, and no other
player shall at such time leave his position in the field, his place at
the bat, on the bases or players' bench, to approach or address the Umpire
in word or act upon such disputed decision. Neither shall any Manager or
other officers of either club--except the Captains as before mentioned--
be permitted to go upon the field or address the Umpire in regard to such
disputed decision, under a penalty of a forfeiture of the game to the
opposing club. The Umpire shall in no case appeal to any spectator for
information in regard to any case, and shall not reverse his decision on
any point of play on the testimony of any player or bystander.

SEC. 2. Before the commencement of a Game, the Umpire shall see that the
rules governing all the materials of the game are strictly observed. He
shall ask the Captain of the Home Club whether there are any special
ground rules to be enforced, and if there are, he shall see that they are
duly enforced, provided they do not conflict with any of these Rules. He
shall also ascertain whether the fence in the rear of the Catcher's
position is distant ninety feet from the Home Base.

SEC. 3. The Umpire must keep the contesting nines playing constantly from
the commencement of the game to its termination, allowing such delays only
as are rendered unavoidable by accident, injury or rain. He must, until
the completion of the game, require the players of each side to promptly
take their positions in the field as soon as the the third man is put out,
and must require the first striker of the opposite side to be in his
position at the bat as soon as the fielders are in their places.

SEC. 4. The Umpire shall count and call every "unfair ball" delivered by
the Pitcher, and every "dead ball," if also an unfair ball, as a "ball,"
and he shall also count and call every "strike." Neither a "ball" nor a
"strike" shall be counted or called until the ball has passed the home
base. He shall also declare every "Dead Ball," "Block," "Foul Hit," "Foul
Strike," and "Balk."

RULE 54. For the special benefit of the patrons of the game, and because
the offences specified are under his immediate jurisdiction, and not
subject to appeal by players, the attention of the Umpire is particularly
directed to possible violations of the purpose and spirit of the Rules of
the following character:

SEC. 1. Laziness or loafing of players in taking their places in the
field, or those allotted them by the Rules when their side is at the bat,
and especially any failure to keep the bats in the racks provided for
them; to be ready (two men) to take position as Batsmen, and to remain
upon the Players' Bench, except when otherwise required by the Rules.

SEC. 2. Any attempt by players of the side at bat, by calling to a
Fielder, other than the one designated by his Captain, to field a ball, or
by any other equally disreputable means seeking to disconcert a Fielder.

SEC. 3. The Rules make a marked distinction between hindrance of an
adversary in fielding a batted or thrown ball. This has been done to rid
the game of the childish excuses and claims formerly made by a Fielder
failing to hold a ball to put out a Base Runner. But there may be cases of
a Base Runner so flagrantly violating the spirit of the Rules and of the
Game in obstructing a Fielder from fielding a thrown ball that it would
become the duty of the Umpire, not only to declare the Base Runner "out"
(and to compel any succeeding Base Runners to hold their bases), but also
to impose a heavy fine upon him. For example: If the Base Runner plainly
strike at the ball while passing him, to prevent its being caught by a
Fielder; if he holds a Fielder's arms so as to disable him from catching
the ball, or if he run against or knock the Fielder down for the same
purpose.

CALLING "PLAY" AND "TIME."

RULE 55. The Umpire must call "Play," promptly at the hour designated by
the Home Club, and on the call of "Play" the game must immediately begin.
When he calls "Time," play shall be suspended until he calls "Play" again,
and during the interim no player shall be put out, base be run, or run be
scored. The Umpire shall suspend play only for an accident to himself or a
player (but in case of accident to a Fielder, "Time" shall not be called
until the ball be returned to, and held by the Pitcher, standing in his
position), or in case rain falls so heavily that the spectators are
compelled, by the severity of the storm, to seek shelter, in which case he
shall note the time of suspension, and should such rain continue to fall
thirty minutes thereafter, he shall terminate the game; or to enforce
order in case of annoyance from spectators.

RULE 56. The Umpire is only allowed, by the Rules, to call "Time" in case
of an accident to himself or a player, a "Block," as referred to in Rule
35, Sec. 3, or in case of rain, as defined by the Rules. The practice of
players suspending the game to discuss or contest a discussion with the
Umpire, is a gross violation of the Rules, and the Umpire must promptly
fine any player who interrupts the game in this manner.

INFLICTING FINES.

RULE 57. The Umpire is empowered to inflict fines of not less than $5.00
nor more than $25.00 for the first offence on players during the progress
of a game, as follows:

SEC 1. For indecent or improper language addressed to the audience, the
Umpire or any player.

SEC. 2. For the Captain or Coacher willfully failing to remain within the
legal bounds of his position, except upon an appeal by the Captain from
the Umpire's decision upon a misinterpretation of the rules.

SEC. 3. For the disobedience by a player of any other of his orders, or
for any other violation of these Rules.

SEC. 4. In case the Umpire imposes a fine on a player, he shall at once
notify the Captain of the offending player's side, and shall transmit a
written notice thereof to the President of the Association or League
within twenty-four hours thereafter, under the penalty of having said fine
taken from his own salary.

SEC. 5. A repetition of any of the above offences shall, at the
discretion of the Umpire, subject the offender either to a repetition of
the fine or to removal from the field and the immediate substitution of
another player then in uniform.

FIELD RULES.

RULE 58. No Club shall allow open betting or pool selling upon its
grounds, nor in any building owned or occupied by it.

RULE 59. No person shall be allowed upon any part of the field during the
progress of the game, in addition to the players in uniform, the Manager
on each side and the Umpire; except such officers of the law as may be
present in uniform, and such officials of the Home Club as may be
necessary to preserve the peace.

RULE 60. No Umpire, Manager, Captain or Player shall address the audience
during the progress of a game, except in case of necessary explanation.

RULE 61. Every Club shall furnish sufficient police force upon its own
grounds to preserve order, and in the event of a crowd entering the field
during the progress of a game, and interfering with the play in any
manner, the Visiting Club may refuse to play further until the field be
cleared. If the ground be not cleared within fifteen minutes thereafter,
the Visiting Club may claim, and shall be entitled to, the game by a score
of nine runs to none (no matter what number of innings have been played).

GENERAL DEFINITIONS.

RULE 62. "Play" is the order of the Umpire to begin the game or to resume
play after its suspension.

RULE 63. "Time" is the order of the Umpire to suspend play. Such
suspension must not extend beyond the day of the game.

RULE 64. "Game" is the announcement by the Umpire that the game is
terminated.

RULE 65. "An Inning" is the term at bat of the nine players representing
a Club in a game, and is completed when three of such players have been
put out as provided in these Rules.

RULE 66. "A Time at Bat" is the term at bat of a Batsman. It begins when
he takes his position, and continues until he is put out or becomes a Base
Runner; except when, because of being hit by a pitched ball, or in case of
an illegal delivery by the Pitcher, as in Rule 44.

RULE 67. "Legal" or "Legally" signifies as required by these Rules.

SCORING.

RULE 68. In order to promote Uniformity in Scoring Championship Games,
the following instructions, suggestions and definitions are made for the
benefit of scorers, and they are required to make all scores in accordance
therewith.

BATTING.

SEC. 1. The first item in the tabulated score, after the player's name
and position, shall be the number of times he has been at bat during the
game. The time or times where the player has been sent to base by being
hit by a pitched ball, by the pitcher's illegal delivery, or by a base on
balls shall not be included in this column.

SEC. 2. In the second column should be set down the runs made by each
player.

SEC. 3. In the third column should be placed the first base hits made by
each player. A base hit should be scored in the following cases:

When the ball from the bat strikes the ground within the foul lines, and
out of reach of the fielders.

When a hit ball is partially or wholly stopped by a fielder in motion,
but such player cannot recover himself in time to handle the ball before
the striker reaches First Base.

When a hit ball is hit so sharply to an infielder that he cannot handle
it in time to put out the batsman. In case of doubt over this class of
hits, score a base hit, and exempt the fielder from the charge of an error.

When a ball is hit so slowly towards a fielder that he cannot handle it
in time to put out the batsman.

That in all cases where a base runner is retired by being hit by a batted
ball, the batsman should be credited with a base hit.

When a batted ball hits the person or clothing of the Umpire, as defined
in Rule 37.

SEC. 4. In the fourth column shall be placed Sacrifice Hits, which shall
be credited to the batsman, who when but one man is out advances a runner
a base on a fly to the outfield or a ground hit, which results in putting
out the batsman, or would so result if handled without error.

FIELDING.

SEC. 5. The number of opponents put out by each player shall be set down
in the fifth column. Where a striker is given out by the Umpire for a foul
strike, or because he struck out of his turn, the put-out shall be scored
to the Catcher.

SEC. 6. The number of times the player assists shall be set down in the
sixth column. An assist should be given to each player who handles the
ball in assisting a run out or other play of the kind.

An assist should be given to a player who makes a play in time to put a
runner out, even if the player who should complete the play fails, through
no fault of the player assisting.

And generally an assist should be given to each player who handles the
ball from the time it leaves the bat until it reaches the player who makes
the put out, or in case of a thrown ball, to each player who throws or
handles it cleanly and in such a way that a put-out results, or would
result if no error were made by the receiver.

ERRORS.

SEC. 7. An error shall be given in the seventh column for each misplay
which allows the striker or base runner to make one or more bases when
perfect play would have insured his being put out, except that "wild
pitches," "bases on balls," "bases on the batsman being struck by a
pitched ball," or case of illegal pitched ball, balks and passed balls,
shall not be included in said column. In scoring errors of batted balls
see Section 3 of this Rule.

STOLEN BASES.

SEC. 8. Stolen bases shall be scored as follows:

Any attempt to steal a base must go to the credit of the base runner,
whether the ball is thrown wild or muffed by the fielder, but any manifest
error is to be charged to the fielder making the same. If the base runner
advances another base he shall not be credited with a stolen base, and the
fielder allowing the advancement is also to be charged with an error. If a
base runner makes a start and a battery error is made, the runner secures
the credit of a stolen base, and the battery error is scored against the
player making it. Should a base runner overrun a base and then be put out,
he should receive the credit for the stolen base.

EARNED RUNS.

SEC. 9. An earned run shall be scored every time the player reaches the
home base unaided by errors before chances have been offered to retire the
side.

THE SUMMARY.

RULE 69. The Summary shall contain:

SEC. 1. The number of earned runs made by each side.

SEC. 2. The number of two-base hits made by each player.

SEC. 3. The number of three-base hits made by each player.

SEC. 4. The number of home runs made by each player.

SEC. 5. The number of bases stolen by each player.

SEC. 6. The number of double and triple plays made by each side, with the
names of the players assisting in the same.

SEC. 7. The number of men given bases on called balls, by each Pitcher.

SEC. 8. The number of men given bases from being hit by pitched balls.

SEC. 9. The number of men struck out.

SEC. 10. The number of passed balls by each Catcher.

SEC. 11. The number of wild pitches by each Pitcher.

SEC. 12. The time of game.

SEC. 13. The name of the Umpire.

AMENDMENTS.

RULE 70. No Amendment or change of any of these National Playing Rules
shall be made, except by a joint committee on rules, consisting of three
members from the National League and three members from the American
Association. Such committee to be appointed at the annual meetings of each
of said bodies to serve one year from the twentieth day of December of
each year. Such committee shall have full power to act, provided that such
amendments shall be made only by an affirmative vote of the majority of
each delegation.

[Illustration: HENRY CHADWICK--"Father of Base Ball."]

Henry Chadwick, the veteran journalist, upon whom the honored sobriquet
of "Father of Base Ball" rests so happily and well, appears in
portraiture, and so well preserved in his physical manhood that his
sixty-three years rest lightly upon his well timed life. Since the age
of thirteen he has resided in Brooklyn, New York, and is an honored member
of the distinguished society of old Brooklynites. He entered upon the
journalistic career in which he has attained eminent distinction in 1856,
his first work finding a ready field on the New York _Times_. In 1857 he
associated himself with the New York _Clipper_, and was identified with
that journal steadily for thirty-one years. After twenty-nine years of
remarkable devotion to the interests of morning journalism in the
metropolis Mr. Chadwick retired in 1886 to accept an editorial position on
the _Outing Magazine_, which, together with his work on the Brooklyn
_Eagle_, keeps his ready pen busy. He is one of the most valued
contributors on _The Sporting Life_ staff, and his work in other journals
has made his name a household word as the "Father of Base Ball." He comes
from a famous family of English birth, his brother, Mr. Edwin Chadwick,
being the noted sanitary philosopher of England. Mr. Chadwick has edited
our League GUIDE since 1880.

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., Chicago and New York.

AN EXPLANATORY APPENDIX
TO THE
NEW CODE OF RULES FOR 1889.

The experience of each season in regard to the conflicting opinions of
umpires and players in their interpretation of the code of playing rules,
has made it a necessity on the part of the editor of the GUIDE, to devote
a special chapter each year to the subject of properly interpreting every
important rule of the game. This year we make up this special chapter in
the form of an _Explanatory Appendix_ to the new code, which is officially
indorsed by the President of the National League, and the Secretary of the
Joint Committee on Rules of the League and the American Association.
Taking up the rules of the new code in their regular order we proceed to
give the official interpretation of the practical application of each
newly amended rule, as also of every rule, of the correct definition of
which there is likely to arise any question.

THE PLAYERS ON EACH SIDE.

"In no case shall less than nine men be allowed to play on each side." So
says Rule 14. The practical application of the rule is that if a club has
not nine men ready to take the field at the hour appointed for beginning a
regularly scheduled championship-game, the club short handed must forfeit
the game. Moreover, if they begin play with the required complement of
men, and one of the number becomes injured and disabled from service in
the field, and they have no legal substitute player to take the disabled
man's place, the game cannot be continued with but eight men in the field,
and therefore it must be similarly forfeited.

PLAYERS MUST BE IN UNIFORM.

Rule 17 requires that "every club shall be required to adopt uniforms for
the players;" and Rule 28 renders it necessary that at least one
substitute player shall be ready "in uniform" to take the place of a
disabled player, or to become the tenth player of the team in accordance
with section 2 of Rule 28.

A TENTH MAN AS SUBSTITUTE.

Besides the regular substitute player required to be ready to take the
place of a disabled player, Rule 28--a new amendment--admits of an
_independent substitute player_ on each side, whose services in the field
are held subject to the requirement of either of the two Captains whenever
he shall deem it advisable to remove any player, who, though not disabled
"by illness or injury," is not doing the work in the field to the
Captain's satisfaction. But such substitute can only replace another
player at the close of a regular innings play; and, moreover, the player
whose place the extra substitute takes, cannot again take part in the game
then being played.

It should be borne in mind that this special rule was adopted not only to
enable the Captain of a team to strengthen a weak point discovered during
the progress of the game, but also to enable him to utilize new talent
when the game has been virtually won, as the experience in such instances
is especially valuable to young players, notably so in the case of battery
players. It also enables the Captain to save the work of a valuable
battery player from a prolonged strain rendered unnecessary by the winning
lead obtained.

PUTTING A NEW BALL IN PLAY.

Rule 12, Sec. 2, requires the Umpire to call for the putting in play of
the substitute ball whenever the ball previously in play, is batted foul
over the fence or the grand stands, "_out of the sight of the players_."
Also in case the ball in play becomes "_unfit for fair use_," as to which
the Umpire is the sole judge.

A new ball can only be called for in case neither of the two balls in use
are legally available for service.

THE NEW RULE FOR PITCHERS.

The amended rule governing the delivery of the ball by the pitcher--Rule
18 of the new code--has had the words "his left foot in front of the
right, and to the left of an imaginary line from his right foot to the
center of the home base" eliminated from it, and in consequence the
pitcher is not now required to abide by that portion of the rule, which
governed his movements in 1888. The pitcher's position, when he prepares
to deliver the ball to the bat, must be that in which he stands with both
feet squarely on the ground, and with one foot--left or right--placed on
the rear line of his position. While thus standing ready to deliver the
ball, he must hold it before him in full sight of the Umpire. The words
"in the act of delivering the ball" refer to the very last motion in
delivery, and in making this motion the rear foot is of necessity placed
on the ground, as it is from this standpoint that the power to give the
last impetus to the ball in delivery is derived. Consequently the foot
cannot be lifted from the ground entirely until the ball leaves his hand.
In making his regular motions to deliver while he is prohibited from
lifting the entire foot in the rear line from the ground, he is not
debarred from lifting the heel of the foot an inch or so. In making the
preliminary movements, too, he cannot take but one forward step, though he
can make this single step in any way he chooses, provided it be a regular
and habitual motion of his delivery.

FEIGNING TO THROW TO A BASE.

When the pitcher feigns to throw to a base prior to delivering the ball
to the bat, in every such instance after making the feint to throw, he
must resume his original position, "facing the batsman,"  and "holding the
ball fairly in front of his body," and "momentarily pause before
delivering the ball to the bat." If he makes a feint to throw and then
delivers the ball with one apparent motion, without pausing to stand, he
commits a balk.

THE ORDER OF BATTING.

Rule 19 says that "Batsmen must take their position at the bat in the
order in which they are named on _the score_." This _score_ is not
sufficiently defined in the rule, but it means the printed or written
order of batting, which each captain of the contesting team presents to
the umpire prior to the commencement of the game; and such order, on
approval of the umpire, should be copied verbatim in the score book of the
official scorer of the home club, who alone is authorized to send a copy
of the score of the game, as the official copy, to the secretary of the
League or Association the club belongs to.

After the order of batting has been submitted to the umpire, it becomes
the official order, and after being thus indorsed it cannot be changed
except in the case of a substitute player taking the place either of a
disabled player, or that of a removed player--under the new rule--and in
such case the incoming substitute player takes the place in the order of
batting of the disabled or removed player.

THE CAPTAIN CAN PLACE HIS MEN AS HE LIKES.

The captain of a nine can place his nine men in any position of the field
he chooses. There is in fact no arbitrary rule governing the placing of
the men except in the case of the pitcher, and he of course must always
occupy the pitcher's box. Under Rule 15, the captain can place his
infielders, in close within the diamond, or all outside of it, also the
outfielders, either in close to the infielders, or lying out deep or close
to the foul line, etc. But the pitcher of the ball must always be in the
"box" when delivering the ball.

THE DEFINITION OF THE BALK.

Rule 32, Section I, defines a balk as "Any motion made by the pitcher to
deliver the ball to the bat without delivering it." This definition
embraces every one of the motions the pitcher is accustomed to make
preliminary to the actual delivery of the ball, whether of his hands,
arms, or feet, or any motion of his body. He cannot therefore make any
pretense of delivering the ball while not having the ball in his hand
ready to deliver it as in the case of a base player hiding the ball while
the pitcher acts as if he himself had possession of it--without his making
a balk.

The words "any motion calculated to deceive a base runner," refer to
pretended movements to deliver outside of those referred to in the first
portion of the rule.

TAKING A BASE ON A BALK.

There is an important distinction between a "_balk_" and an "_illegal
delivery_." A "_balk_" is made when the pitcher makes a motion to deliver
the ball to the bat without following such motion with actual delivery, or
if he holds the ball in his hand long enough to unnecessarily delay the
game. An "_illegal delivery_" is made when the pitcher steps out of his
"box" in delivery, or lifts his rear foot from the ground before the ball
leaves his hand--his lifting his foot afterward is of no account--or if he
fails to pause before delivery after making a feint to throw to a base. In
the case of a "balk," every occupant of a base, as a base runner, becomes
entitled to one base, whether forced by the batsman or not. But the
batsman cannot take a base on a "balk." In the case of an "illegal
delivery," however, while occupants of bases can only take a base on such
delivery in case of being "forced off," the batsman is given a base on
such illegal delivery.  While an "illegal delivery" is in the nature of a
balk, it is not an actual "balk" as technically termed in the rules.

DEAD BALLS.

The ball cannot be used to put a player on the batting side out, either
in the case of a batted ball to foul ground not caught on the fly; a
called _foul strike_; a runner being hit by a batted ball; a pitched ball
striking the batsman, or striking his bat without being intentionally
struck at; or from the ball striking the umpire while he is on foul
ground, before it passes the catcher; or, in the case of a called block
ball, until said ball is _first held by the pitcher while standing within
his position_.

THE FOUL TIP CATCH.

The elimination of the sharp foul-tip catch from the rules will
necessitate the placing of a white line, forming a half circle, within a
radius of ten feet from the home base, and located on foul ground, as it
is only foul tips caught within ten feet of the home base which do not put
the batsman out.

THE BLOCKING OF BALLS.

Any interference with the progress of a batted or thrown ball by any
person not one of the contesting players in a game, is what is termed
_blocking the ball_. Suppose a ball is batted to the short stop, and that
fielder overthrows the ball to first base, and it goes toward the crowd
and is there stopped or touched by an outsider, the moment this stoppage
of the ball or interference with it occurs, the umpire must call "Block
ball," and until the ball is returned to the field and held by the pitcher
while in his "box," it is _dead_ for putting out any base runner; and such
runners are permitted to run all the bases they can until the ball is thus
put legally into play. But should such overthrown ball, in addition to its
being stopped or diverted from its course by any outsider, be also kicked
aside or picked up and thrown out of reach by a fielder, the umpire must
in addition call "Time," in which case runners shall only be entitled to
hold such bases as they had touched before the ball had been so kicked or
thrown out of reach, the ball, as in the prior case, not being in play
until held by the pitcher while in his box.

HITTING BALLS FOUL INTENTIONALLY.

Rule 42, Section III, requires the umpire to call a strike on the batsman
every time he makes "an obvious attempt to make a foul hit." Rule 43,
Section XIII, states that "If, after two strikes have been called, the
batsman _obviously attempts to make a foul hit_" he is out. Last year
these rules were both misinterpreted by umpires. In the first place, in
both cases the _intention_ of the batsman must be plainly manifest; and to
judge of this the circumstances of the case must be taken into
consideration. For instance, if the batsman _bunts_ a ball foul when a
runner is on abase, it is evident that he does so unintentionally, for no
point of play is to be gained by such a foul hit. Then, too, the hitting
of a foul ball must be repeatedly done before such hitting can be adjudged
as otherwise than accidental.

BATTING OUT OF ORDER.

Rule 43 states that the batsman who fails to bat in his proper turn
according to the approved order of batting, must be decided out by the
umpire, unless the error in question be discovered and the right batsman
be sent to the bat in the regular order "_before a fair hit has been
made_." If, before the mistake is discovered, "strikes" or "balls" be
called upon the batsman who is out of his order of batting, such strikes
and balls shall be counted against the batsman who should have gone to the
bat in the regular order. But the violation of the rule must be declared
by the field Captain before the ball is delivered to a succeeding batsman,
or the penalty of an out cannot be enforced, the mistake, of course, being
at once corrected, without the enforcement of the penalty.

RETURNING TO BASES ON FOUL BALLS.

The change made in Rule 45 is to the effect that base runners required to
return to bases which they had left on a hit ball, can, if the ball be hit
foul and not caught on the fly, return to their respective bases directly.
For instance, suppose the batsman hits a long fly ball to right field, on
which he runs to third base before the ball falls on foul ground, under
the old rule he would be required to return to home base after retouching
second and first bases; but under the new rule he can in such case return
to home base direct from third, instead of returning around the diamond.
The object of the amended rule was to save loss of time by a runner's
leisurely return to the base he had left.

HOLDING BASES AFTER TOUCHING THEM.

Rule 45, in its reference to a base runner having the right to hold a
base after touching it, is to be thus defined: Suppose that base runners
are on third and second bases, and that the runner on third is trying to
steal home, and in doing so vacates third base and runs for home base, the
occupant of second base in the meantime running to third base and holding
that base; and suppose that in such case the runner from third to home
finds himself likely to be put out at home base, and then returns to third
base, he still has the right to that base, and having such right, the
runner from second to third must give up holding third base and try and
get back to second, failing which, and preferring to hold third base, he
can be put out there even while standing on third base, provided the legal
occupant of that base is also standing on that base, but not otherwise.

OBSTRUCTING BASE RUNNERS.

Rule 46, Section VI, states that a base runner is entitled to the base he
is running to "_if he be prevented from making that base by the
obstruction of an adversary._" Now the correct interpretation of this rule
is that such obstruction as that in question must be that at the hands of
a fielder who has not the ball in hand ready to touch the runner. Of
course if the runner is met by the fielder with ball in hand ready to
touch the runner, and thus stands directly in the path of the runner, no
legal obstruction has been presented, though in fact he is obstructed.
But the "obstruction" meant by the rule is that presented by a fielder who
has not the ball in hand at the time.

A THROWN BALL HITTING THE UMPIRE ON FAIR GROUND.

Rule 47, Section IV, states that "The base runner shall return to his
base and be entitled to so return without being put out, if the person or
clothing of the umpire is struck by a ball thrown by the catcher to
intercept a base runner." Rule 46, in referring to base runners entitled
to take bases without being put out, states that "if a fair hit ball
strikes the person or clothing of the umpire, the batsman making the hit,
or a base runner running a base upon such a hit, shall be entitled to the
base he is running for without being put out." For instance, suppose there
is a runner at first base trying to steal second, and the catcher throws
the ball to the second baseman to cut him off, and that the ball thus
thrown hits the umpire and glances off out of the reach of the fielders,
the runner in such case, while being debarred from making second base by
the accident, is allowed to return to the base he left without being put
out. But the umpire must see to it that the ball is not intentionally
thrown to hit the umpire with a view of preventing what would otherwise be
a successful steal. In other words, the throw in question must be an
accidental one, or it must be judged as an illegal play.

THE COACHING RULE.

Umpires must enforce the rule governing the "coaching" of base runners in
accordance with the spirit as well as the letter of the law, and this
forbids the addressing of any remarks except to the base runner, and then
only in words of necessary direction. Moreover, no coacher is allowed to
use any language, in his position either as player or coacher, "which
shall in anyway" refer to or reflect upon a player of the opposing club.
The noisy, vulgar yelling of some coachers is in direct violation of the
spirit of the rule, as it is done, not to coach the runner, but to confuse
the pitcher or catcher, and distract their attention. The penalty for
violating the rule is the suspension of all coaching by the offending club
during the remainder of the game.

PLAYERS MUST BE SEATED ON THEIR BENCH.

Rule 54, Section I, requires that all the players of the batting side
when not actually engaged in batting, base running or in coaching--as in
the case of the two appointed coachers--must remain seated on the bench
until called in their turn to go to the bat. The umpire too must see to it
that the requirements of this same rule be strictly enforced in regard to
keeping the bats in the racks, and not allow them to be laid on the ground
in the way of the catcher running to catch foul balls.

REMOVING A PLAYER FOR KICKING.

The most important change in the rules affecting the duties of the umpire
is that made in Rule 57, Section V, which gives the umpire the
discretionary power to remove an offending player from the field who is
found violating Rule 57.

It should be borne in mind, however, that the rule is not compulsory, for
if it were so, a captain desirous of substituting another player for one
in the field, after he had availed himself of the tenth man rule, might
conspire with a player to violate the rule intentionally to aid the
captain in getting in an extra man.

ON CALLED STRIKES.

In the case of a called third strike when two men are out, Rule 43,
Section VI., requires the ball to be held on the fly whether first base be
occupied or not, in order to put the batsman out. But in the case of the
first base being occupied by a base runner, when only one man is out, when
the third strike is called, in such case the batsman is out on called
strikes, whether the ball on the third called strike is held on the fly or
not. The batsman is out too,--under the new rule--if, _when the thud
strike is called, the pitched ball hits him or touches his clothing_.

ON FORFEITED GAMES.

The Joint Rules Committee have decided that an umpire cannot declare any
game forfeited of his own motion, though in Rule 26 it states that
forfeited games are incurred under several conditions, one of which
definitely states is the wilful violation of any one rule of the code. But
he can declare a game forfeited under any one of the specified conditions
in Rule 26 if requested to do so by the captain of the club at fault.
Section IV of Rule 26 gives the umpire the discretionary power to declare
any game forfeited in which he is personally cognizant of the fact of any
single rule having been wilfully violated, the offending team forfeiting
the game then and there. But only in very rare cases should this power be
used in opposition to the wishes of the captain of the team not in fault.
When the rules have been plainly violated and the captain of the team not
in fault claims forfeit, the umpire must enforce the penalty.

THE UMPIRE'S POWER.

Under Section II of Rule 52 the umpire _is invested with the
authority to order any player to do, or to omit to do, any act, as he may
deem it necessary_, to give force or effect to any or all of the
provisions of the code of playing rules. This gives him the authority to
decide all disputed points in a game not expressly covered by the rules,
subject, of course, to legal protest.

JUDGING THE CONDITION OF THE FIELD.

Rule 29 gives the captain of the home club the sole power to decide
whether the field is in condition for play at the hour appointed for
beginning a game. But after a game has been commenced, and it be
interrupted by rain, the umpire alone decides whether the field is in fair
condition for resuming play after such suspension of the game.

THE UMPIRE SOLE JUDGE OF ILLNESS OR INJURY.

Rule 28 makes the umpire the sole judge as to the nature and extent of
the "illness or injury" claimed to disable a player from service on the
field. The captains have nothing to say in the matter. All they can do is
to appeal to the umpire, and abide by his decision.

GAMES STOPPED BY RAIN.

Rule 55 the umpire is prohibited from suspending play in a match game on
account of rain, unless "_rain falls so heavily that the spectators are
compelled by the severity of the storm_, to seek shelter." If the rain is
light, or an ordinary drizzle, it is not sufficient to legalize the
suspension of the play.

THE CAPTAIN ONLY CAN ADDRESS THE UMPIRE.

Rules 53 and 57 are explicit in prohibiting any player, except the
captain of the nine, from addressing the umpire in regard to any decision
he may make; and even the captain can only do so in the case of a question
involving an error in misinterpreting the rules. If the decision disputed
involves only an error of judgment, even the captain has no right to
question the decision. In every case of a violation of this rule, the
umpire must fine the offender _five dollars_, or he himself be liable to
immediate dismissal for violating the rules.

BATSMEN CHANGING POSITION.

Last season a custom came into vogue which virtually violated Section V
of Rule 43. It was the habit some batsmen had of jumping from one batting
position to the other just as the pitcher was about to deliver the ball to
the bat, this act virtually hindering the catcher from properly fielding
the pitched ball. While no rule should prevent a batsman from batting from
either the left or the right batting position at his option it certainly
was never intended to allow the change to be made while play was in
progress: and it therefore becomes the duty of the umpire to interpret
this rule according to its spirit, and to regard the action of a batsman
in jumping from one position to the other while the ball is in play from
pitcher to catcher as hindering the catcher, and in such case he should
declare him out.

INTERFERING WITH A BATTED OR THROWN BALL.

Rule 48 prohibits a base runner from interfering with a fielder
attempting to field a batted ball. The runner has no right to the line of
the base when a fielder is occupying it in the effort to catch a fly ball,
or to field a batted ball; nor can a base runner make any attempt to
hinder or obstruct a fielder from fielding a thrown ball without his being
promptly decided out. In all cases the base runner must run off the line
of the bases to avoid interfering with a fielder standing on the line of
the bases to field a batted ball. Section VIII of Rule 28 says, "_Or
intentionally interferes with a thrown ball_," and the intention is judged
by his effort to avoid interference or not.

PASSED BALLS WHICH GIVE A BASE.

Rule 46, Section IV., states that in the case of a pitched ball which
passes the catcher and then touches the umpire; or if such passed ball
touches any fence or building within ninety feet of the home base, the
runner is entitled to one base without being put out, and can of course
take more at his own risk.

OVERRUNNING FIRST BASE.

The base runner, in running to first base, is only exempt from being
touched out after overrunning the base, when he turns to the right after
overrunning the base. If he crosses the foul line after overrunning,
toward second base, that is tantamount to turning to the left, but so long
as he is on foul ground after overrunning the base, it is immaterial
whether he turns to the left or to the right. The leaving foul ground in
overrunning decides the point against him. It is best, however, always to
turn to the right in returning.

DOUBTFUL DECISIONS IN FAVOR OF THE BATTING SIDE.

The rules expressly make a distinction in favor of the batting side in
all cases where there is any doubt as to the player being fairly out.
Especially is this the case in the case of the batsman's being put out at
first base, for Section IV. of Rule 48 requires the ball to be securely
held by the base player "_before_" the runner touches the base in order to
put him out, and the rub applies to the touching out of all base runners
on bases; the words being "_before_" the runner reaches the base, if at
the same time, he--the runner--is not out. Time and again were base
runners unfairly decided out last season in cases where the ball was held
by the base player simultaneously with the runner's touching the base,
every such decision being illegal.

In regard to the umpire's enforcement of Rule 48, President Young says,
"Too many base runners are decided out when the ball is held by the base
player simultaneously with the runner's reaching the base, which decisions
are illegal." If umpires  will strictly enforce the rule it will greatly
increase the chances for base running and team work at the bat.

Mr. Byrne, of the Joint Rules Committee, in joining with Mr. Young in
having this rule enforced, says: "We are doing all we can to encourage
base stealing and a proper attention to the rule, by more frequently
deciding men safe at first, as it will add interest to the game. I
believe, too, that it would be wise in all cases of decision on first base
points for the Umpire to give the base runner  the benefit of the doubt."

BATTED BALLS HITTING THE BASES.

Since the first and third bases were placed entirely on fair ground and
within the foul lines, every batted ball touching either the first or
third base bag, must be declared a fair ball no matter where it strikes
after touching either bag. It would be better to have the bags in question
on foul ground, so as to make every batted ball foul that strikes them;
but until this is done, all such batted balls must be declared fair.

COACHERS MUST KEEP WITHIN THEIR LINES.

Captains or their assistants who engage in "coaching" base runners, must
keep within the lines of their designated position, or if they attempt to
coach a runner while standing outside of their position, or to run toward
home base outside the lines of their position, they must be fined five
dollars for each violation of the rule.

OPEN BETTING PROHIBITED.

Rule 58 prohibits open betting on all ball grounds of clubs governed by
the rules of the _National Agreement_. The penalty for a violation of this
rule is the forfeiture of the game which is being played when the rule is
violated; and the Umpire must enforce  this rule or be amenable to a
prompt removal from his position.

NO UMPIRE TO BE INSULTED.

Rule 52 states that "the umpire is master of the field from the
commencement to the termination of the game; and he is entitled to the
respect of the spectators, and _any person offering any insult or
indignity to him must be promptly ejected from the grounds_," under the
penalty of a forfeiture of the game.

[**Proofreaders note: the chart has been reformatted to improve
readability**].

NATIONAL LEAGUE SCHEDULE OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES FOR 1889.

Boston
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
At      |At         |At        |At      |At       |At       |At
New York|Philadelp'a|Washingt'n|Chicago |Cleveland|Pittsburg|Indianapl's
--------+-----------+----------+--------+---------+---------+------------
April 24|April 29   |May    3  |June  28|July   4,|June  19 |June  24
        |           |          |        |   a.m.  |         |
  "   25|  "   30   | "     4  |  "   29|  "    4,|  "   20 |  "   25
        |           |          |        |   p.m.  |         |
  "   26|May    1   | "     6  |July   1|  "    5 |  "   21 |  "   26
  "   27| "     2   | "     7  |  "    2|  "    6 |  "   22 |  "   27
June  10|July  25   |Aug.   1  |Aug.   8|Aug.  15 |Aug.  12 |Aug.   5
  "   11|  "   26   | "     2  |  "    9| "    16 |  "   13 |  "    6
  "   12|  "   27   | "     3  |  "   10| "    17 |  "   14 |  "    7
Aug.  29|Aug.  26   |Sept. 19  |Sept. 23|Sept. 30 |Oct.   3 |Sept. 26
 "    30|  "   27   |  "   20  |  "   24|Oct.   1 |  "    4 |  "   27
 "    31|  "   28   |  "   21  |  "   25| "     2 |  "    5 |  "   28
------------------------------------------------------------------------

New York
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----
At      |At         |At        |At      |At       |At       |At
Boston  |Philadelp'a|Washingt'n|Chicago |Cleveland|Pittsburg|Indianapl's
--------+-----------+----------+--------+---------+---------+------------
May    8|May    3   |June   1  |June  24|June  19 |July  4, |June  28
        |           |          |        |         |   a.m.  |
 "     9| "     4   | "     3  |  "   25|  "   20 |  "   4, |  "   29
        |           |          |        |         |   p.m.  |
 "    10| "     6   | "     4  |  "   26|  "   21 |  "    5 |July   1
 "    11| "     7   | "     5  |  "   27|  "   22 |  "    6 |  "    2
June   6|July  22   |July  29  |Aug.   5|Aug.  12 |Aug.  15 |Aug.   8
 "     7| "    23   | "    30  |  "    6|  "   13 | "    16 |  "    9
 "     8| "    24   | "    31  |  "    7|  "   14 | "    17 |  "   10
Aug.  19|Sept. 19   |Sept. 16  |Sept. 26|Oct.   3 |Sept. 30 |Sept. 23
 "    20| "    20   | "    17  |  "   27| "     4 |Oct.   1 |  "   24
 "    21| "    21   | "    18  |  "   28| "     5 | "     2 |  "   25
--------------------------------------------------------------------------


Philadelphia
---------------------------------------------------------------------
At      |At      |At        |At      |At       |At       |At
Boston  |New York|Washingt'n|Chicago |Cleveland|Pittsburg|Indianapl's
--------+--------+----------+--------+---------+---------+------------
June   1|June  13|April 24  |June  19|June  24 |June  28 |July   4,
        |        |          |        |         |         |   a.m.
  "    3|  "   14|  "   25  |  "   20|  "   25 |  "   29 |  "    4,
        |        |          |        |         |         |   p.m.
  "    4|  "   15|  "   26  |  "   21|  "   26 |July   1 |"      5
  "    5|  "   17|  "   27  |  "   22|  "   27 |  "    2 |"      6
July  29|Aug.   1|June  10  |Aug.  12|Aug.   8 |Aug.   5 |Aug.  15
  "   30|  "    2|  "   11  |  "   13|  "    9 |  "    6 | "    16
  "   31|  "    3|  "   12  |  "   14|  "   10 |  "    7 | "    17
Sept. 16|  "   22|Aug.  29  |Oct.   3|Sept. 23 |Sept. 26 |Sept. 30
  "   17|  "   23|  "   30  |  "    4|  "   24 |  "   27 |Oct.   1
  "   18|  "   24|  "   31  |  "    5|  "   25 |  "   28 | "     2
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Washington
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
At      |At      |At         |At      |At       |At       |At
Boston  |New York|Philadelp'a|Chicago |Cleveland|Pittsburg|Indianapl's
--------+--------+-----------+--------+---------+---------+------------
June  13|April 29|May    8   |July  4,|June  28 |June  24 |June  19
        |        |           |   a.m. |         |         |
  "   14|  "   30|  "    9   | "    4,|  "   29 |  "   25 | "    20
        |        |           |   p.m. |         |         |
  "   15|May    1|  "   10   |  "    5|July   1 |  "   26 | "    21
  "   17|  "    2|  "   11   |  "    6|  "    2 |  "   27 | "    22
July  22|July  25|June   6   |Aug.  15|Aug.   5 |Aug.   8 |Aug.  12
  "   23|  "   26|  "    7   |  "   16|  "    6 |  "    9 | "    13
  "   24|  "   27|  "    8   |  "   17|  "    7 |  "   10 | "    14
Aug.  22|Aug.  26|Aug.  19   |Sept. 30|Sept. 26 |Sept. 23 |Oct.   3
  "   23|  "   27|  "   20   |Oct.   1|  "   27 |  "   24 | "     4
  "   24|  "   28|  "   21   |  "    2|  "   28 |  "   25 | "     5
-----------------------------------------------------------------------


Chicago
------------------------------------------------------------------------
At     |At       |At         |At        |At       |At       |At
Boston |New York |Philadelp'a|Washingt'n|Cleveland|Pittsburg|Indianapl's
-------+---------+-----------+----------+---------+---------+------------
May  28|May    22|May   13   |May   17  |May   3  |Apr. 24  |Apr. 29
 "   29| "     23| "    14   | "    18  | "    4  | "   25  | "   30
May  30| "     24| "    15   | "    20  | "    6  | "   26  |May   1
   a.m.|         |           |          |         |         |
 "   30| "     25| "    16   | "    21  | "    7  | "   27  | "    2
   p.m.|         |           |          |         |         |
July 18|July   15|July  11   |July   8  |June 14  |July 29  |July 25
 "   19| "     16| "    12   | "     9  | "   15  | "   30  | "   26
 "   20| "     17| "    13   | "    10  | "   17  | "   31  | "   27
Sept. 9| Sept. 12|Sept.  2   |Sept.  5  |Aug. 26  |Aug. 29  |Aug. 19
 "   10| "     13| "     3   | "     6  | "   27  | "   30  | "   20
 "   11| "     14| "     4   | "     7  | "   28  | "   31  | "   21
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Cleveland
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
At      |At      |At         |At        |At      |At        |At
Boston  |New York|Philadelp'a|Washingt'n|Chicago |Pittsburg|Indianapl's
-------+---------+-----------+----------+---------+---------+------------
May   17|May   13|May   22   |May   28  |May    3| Apr. 24  |Apr.  29
 "    18| "    14| "    23   | "    29  | "     4| "    25  | "    30
 "    20| "    15| "    24   |May   30  | "     6| "    26  |May    1
        |        |           |   a.m.   |        |          |
 "    21| "    16| "    25   | "    30  | "     7| "    27  | "     2
        |        |           |   p.m.   |        |          |
July   8|July  11|July  15   |July  18  | June 14| July 29  | July 25
 "     9| "    12| "    16   | "    19  | "    15| "    30  | "    26
 "    10| "    13| "    17   | "    20  | "    17| "    31  | "    27
Sept. 12|Sept.  9|Sept.  5   |Sept.  2  | Aug. 26| Aug. 29  | Aug. 19
 "    13| "    10| "     6   | "     3  | "    27| "    30  | "    20
 "    14| "    11| "     7   | "     4  | "    28| "    31  | "    21
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Pittsburg
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
At      |At      |At         |At        |At      |At       |At
Boston  |New York|Philadelp'a|Washingt'n|Chicago |Cleveland|Indianapl's
-------+---------+-----------+----------+--------+---------+------------
May   13|May   17|May   28   |May   22  |June   1|Apr.  29 |Apr. 24
 "    14| "    18| "    29   | "    23  | "     3| "    30 | "   25
 "    15| "    20|May   30   | "    24  | "     4|May    1 | "   26
        |        |   a.m.    |          |        |         |
 "    16| "    21| "    30   | "    25  | "     5| "     2 | "   27
        |        |     p.m.  |          |        |         |
July  11|July   8|July  18   |July  15  |Aug.   1|July  25 |June 11
"     12| "     9| "    19   | "    16  | "     2| "    26 | "   12
 "    13| "    10| "    20   | "    17  | "     3| "    27 | "   13
 Sept. 5|Sept.  2|Sept.  9   |Sept. 12  |Sept. 19|Sept. 16 |Aug. 22
        |   a.m. |           |          |        |         |
 "     6| "     2| "    10   | "    13  | "    20| "    17 | "   23
        |   p.m. |           |          |        |         |
 "     7| "     3| "    11   | "    14  | "    21| "    18 | "   24
-------------------------------------------------------------------


Indianapolis
----------------------------------------------------------------------
At      |At      |At         |At        |At      |At       |At
Boston  |New York|Philadelp'a|Washingt'n|Chicago |Cleveland|Pittsburg
-------+---------+-----------+----------+--------+---------+------------
May   22|May  28 |May   17   |May   13  |June   6|May   8  |June  1
 "    23| "   29 | "    18   | "    14  | "     7| "    9  | "    3
 "    24|May  30 | "    20   | "    15  | "     8| "   10  | "    4
        |   a.m. |           |          |        |         |
 "    25| "   30 | "    21   | "    16  | "    10| "   11  | "    5
        |   p.m. |           |          |        |         |
July  15|July 18 |July   8   |July  11  |July  22|July 29  |Aug.  1
 "    16| "   19 | "     9   | "    12  | "    23| "   30  | "    2
 "    17| "   20 | "    10   | "    13  | "    24| "   31  | "    3
Sept.  2|Sept. 5 |Sept. 12   |Sept.  9  |Sept. 16|Aug. 29  | "   26
   a.m. |        |           |          |        |         |
 "     2| "    6 | "    13   | "    10  | "    17| "   30  | "   27
   p.m. |        |           |          |        |         |
Sept.  8| "    7 | "    14   | "    11  | "    18| "   31  | "   28
----------------------------------------------------------------------

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION SCHEDULE OF CHAMPIONSHIOP GAMES FOR 1889

Brooklyn
In          |In        |In       |In         |In        |In      |In
Philadelphia|Baltimore.|Columbus.|Cincinnati.|Louisville|St.     |Kansas
            |          |         |           |          |  Louis.| City
------------+----------+---------+-----------+----------+--------+-------
April 17    |April 22  |May  25  |May   11   |May   7   |May  16 |May 20
            |          |   [1]   |   [1]     |          |        |
  "   18    |  "   23  | "   26  | "    12   | "    8   | "   17 | "  21
            |          |   [2]   |   [2]     |          |        |
  "   20    |  "   24  | "   27  | "    13   | "    9   | "   18 | "  22
   [1]      |          |         |           |          |   [1]  |
  "   21    |Aug.  27  | "   28  | "    14   | "   10   | "   19 | "  23
   [2]      |          |         |           |          |   [2]  |
June  29    |  "   28  |Aug.  6  |July  13   |July 10   |July  3 |July 6
   [1]      |          |         |   [1]     |          |        |   [1]
  "   30    |  "   29  | "    7  | "    14   | "   11   | "    4 | "7
            |          |         |           |                   |   [2]
   [2]      |          |         |   [2]     |          |        |
July   1    |Oct.   8  | "    8  | "    15   | "   12   | "    4 | "  8
Sept. 17    |  "    9  |Oct. 12  |Aug.  22   |Aug. 17   |Aug. 10 |Aug.13
            |          |   [1]   |           |   [1]    |   [1]  |
  "   18    |  "   10  | "   13  | "    24   | "   18   | "   11 | "  14
            |          |   [2]   |   [1]     |   [2]    |   [2]  |
  "   19    |  "   11  | "   14  | "    25   | "   20   | "   12 | "  15
            |          |         |    [2]    |          |        |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Footnote 1: Saturday]
[Footnote 2: Sunday]

Athletics
In       |In        |In       |In         |In        |In      |In
Brooklyn.|Baltimore.|Columbus.|Cincinnati.|Louisville|St.     |Kansas
         |          |         |           |          |  Louis.| City
---------+----------+---------+-----------+----------+--------+---------
May   2  |April 25  |April 28 |May   7    |May  11   |May  20 |May  16
         |          |   [2]   |           |   [1]    |        |
 "    3  | "    26  | "    29 | "    8    | "   12   | "   21 | "   17
         |          |         |           |   [2]    |        |
 "    4  | "    27  | "    30 | "    9    | "   13   | "   22 | "   18
   [1]   |   [1]    |         |           |          |        |   [1]
 "    5  |May   25  |Aug.  27 | "   10    | "   14   | "   23 | "   19
   [2]   |   [1]    |         |           |          |        |   [2]
July 18  | "    27  | "    28 |July  6    |July  3   |July 10 |July 13
         |          |         |   [1]     |          |        |   [1]
 "   20  | "    28  | "    29 | "    7    | "    4   | "   11 | "   14
   [1]   |          |         |   [2]     |          |        |   [2]
 "   21  | "    29  |Oct.   8 | "    8    | "    4   | "   12 | "   15
   [2]   |          |         |           |          |        |
Oct.  3  |Sept. 21  | "     9 |Aug. 13    |Aug. 10   |Aug. 17 |Aug. 22
         |   [1]    |         |           |   [1]    |   [1]  |
 "    5  | "    23  | "    10 | "   14    | "   11   | "   18 | "   24
   [1]   |          |         |           |   [2]    |   [2]  |   [1]
 "    6  | "    24  | "    11 | "   15    | "   12   | "   20 | "   25
   [2]   |          |         |           |          |        |   [2]
---------------------------------------------------------------------
[Footnote 1: Saturday]
[Footnote 2: Sunday]

Baltimore
In       |In          |In       |In         |In        |In      |In
Brooklyn.|Philadelphia|Columbus.|Cincinnati.|Louisville|St.     |Kansas
         |            |         |           |          |  Louis.| City
---------+------------+---------+-----------+----------+--------+---------
--
April 28 |June  23    |May    2 |May  16    |May  20   |May  11 |May  7
   [2]   |   [2]      |         |           |          |   [1]  |
 "    29 | "    24    | "     3 | "   17    | "   21   | "   12 | "   8
         |            |         |           |          |   [2]  |
 "    30 | "    25    | "     4 | "   18    | "   22   | "   13 | "   9
         |            |   [1]   |   [1]     |          |        |
May    1 | "    26    | "     5 | "   19    | "   23   | "   14 | "   10
         |            |   [2]   |   [2]     |          |        |
June  19 |Aug.   6    |July  18 |July  3    |July  6   |July 13 |July 10
         |            |         |           |   [1]    |   [1]  |
 "    20 | "     7    | "    20 | "    4    | "    7   | "   14 | "   11
         |            |   [1]   |           |   [2]    |   [2]  |
 "    22 | "     8    | "    21 | "    4    | "    8   | "   15 | "   12
   [1]   |            |   [2]   |           |          |        |
Sept. 27 | Oct. 12    |Sept. 17 |Aug. 10    |Aug. 13   |Aug. 22 |Aug. 17
         |   [1]      |         |   [1]     |          |        |   [1]
 "    28 | "    13    | "    18 | "   11    | "   14   | "   24 | "   18
   [1]   |   [2]      |         |   [2]     |          |   [1]  |   [2]
 "    29 | "    14    | "    19 | "   12    | "   15   | "   25 | "   20
   [2]   |            |         |           |          |   [2]  |
------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Footnote 1: Saturday]
[Footnote 2: Sunday]

Columbus
In       |In          |In        |In         |In        |In      |In
Brooklyn.|Philadelphia|Baltimore.|Cincinnati.|Louisville|St.     |Kansas
         |            |          |           |          |Louis.  |City
---------|------------|----------|-----------|----------|--------|-------
April  25|April 22    |April 17  |May  20    |May  16   |May   7 |May  11
         |            |          |           |          |        |   [1]
 "    26 | "    23    | "    18  | "   21    | "   17   | "    8 | " 12
         |            |          |           |          |        |   [2]
 "    27 | "    24    | "    19  | "   22    | "   18   | "    9 | " 13
   [1]   |            |          |           |   [1]    |        |
June  23 |June  19    | "    20  | "   23    | "   19   | "   10 | "   14
   [2]   |            |   [1]    |           |   [2]    |        |
 "    24 | "    20    |June  27  |July 10    |July 13   |July  6 |July  3
         |            |          |           |   [1]    |   [1]  |
 "    25 | "    21    | "    28  | "   11    | "   14   | "    7 | "    4
         |            |          |           |   [2]    |   [2]  |
 "    26 | "    22    | "    29  | "   12    | "   15   | "    8 | "    4
         |   [1]      |   [1]    |           |          |        |
Sept. 21 |Sept. 28    |Oct.   3  |Aug. 17    |Aug. 22   |Aug. 13 |Aug. 10
   [1]   |   [1]      |          |   [1]     |          |        |   [1]
 "    22 | "    29    | "     4  | "   18    | "   24   | "   14 | "   11
   [2]   |   [2]      |          |   [2]     |   [1]    |        |   [2]
 "    24 | "    30    | "     5  | "    20   | "   25   | "   15 | "   12
         |            |   [1]    |           |   [2]    |        |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Footnote 1: Saturday]
[Footnote 2: Sunday]

Cincinnati
In       |In          |In        |In       |In        |In       |In
Brooklyn.|Philadelphia|Baltimore.|Columbus.|Louisville|St.      |Kansas
         |            |          |         |          | Louis.  |City.
---------+------------+----------+---------+----------+---------+------
June 13  |May  30     |June  3   |June   8 |May   25  |April 25 |April 29
         |            |          |   [1]   |   [1]    |         |
 "   14  | "   30     | "    4   | "     9 | "    26  | "    26 | "  30
         |            |          |   [2]   |   [2]    |         |
 "   15  |June  1     | "    5   | "    10 | "    27  | "    27 |May    1
   [1]   |   [1]      |          |         |          |   [1]   |
 "   16  | "    2     | "    6   | "    11 | "    28  | "    28 | "   2
   [2]   |    [2]     |          |         |          |    [2]  |
July 26  |July 23     |Aug.  2   |July  29 |Aug.   7  |June  25 |June  29
         |            |          |         |          |         |   [1]
 "   27  | "   24     | "    3   | "    30 | "     8  | "    26 | "  30
   [1]   |            |   [1]    |         |          |         |   [2]
 "   28  | "   25     | "    5   | "    31 | "     9  | "    27 |July   1
   [2]   |            |          |         |          |         |
Sept. 2  |Aug. 30     |Sept. 7   |Sept. 12 |Sept. 17  |Sept. 21 |Sept. 26
         |            |   [1]    |         |          |   [1]   |
 "    2  | "   31     | "    9   | "    14 | "    18  | "    22 | "  28
         |   [1]      |          |   [1]   |          |   [2]   |   [1]
 "    4  |Sept. 1     | "   10   | "    15 | "    19  | "    23 | "  29
         |   [2]      |          |   [2]   |          |         |   [2]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Footnote 1: Saturday]
[Footnote 2: Sunday]

Louisville
In       |In          |In        |In       |In         |In       |In
Brooklyn.|Philadelphia|Baltimore.|Columbus.|Cincinnati.|St.      |Kansas
         |            |          |         |           |Louis.   |City.
---------+------------+----------+---------+-----------+---------+--------
June   8 |June   3    |June 13   |May   30 |May   4    |April 29 |April 25
   [1]   |            |          |         |   [1]     |         |
 "     9 | "     4    | "   14   | "    30 | "    5    | "    30 | "  26
   [2]   |            |          |         |   [2]     |         |
 "    10 | "     5    | "   15[1]|June   1 | "    6    |May    1 | "  27
         |            |          |   [1]   |           |         |   [1]
 "    11 | "     6    | "   17   | "     2 |Aug. 26    | "     2 | "  28
         |            |          |   [2]   |           |         |   [2]
July  30 |Aug.   2    |July 23   |July  26 | "   27    |June  29 |June  26
         |            |          |         |           |   [1]   |
 "    31 | "     3    | "   24   | "    27 | "   28    | "    30 | "  27
         |   [1]      |          |   [1]   |           |   [2]   |
Aug    1 | "     4    | "   25   | "    28 |Oct.  3    |July   1 | "  28
         |   [2]      |          |   [2]   |           |         |
Sept. 12 |Sept.  7    |Aug. 30   |Sept.  3 | "    4    |Sept. 26 |Sept. 21
         |   [1]      |          |         |           |         |   [1]
 "    14 | "     8    | "   31   | "     4 | "    5    | "    28 | "  22
   [1]   |   [2]      |   [1]    |         |   [1]     |   [1]   |   [2]
 "    15 | "     9    |Sept. 2   | "     5 | "    6    | "    29 | "  23
   [2]   |            |          |         |   [2]     |   [2]   |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Footnote 1: Saturday]
[Footnote 2: Sunday]

St. Louis
In        |In          |In        |In       |In         |In        |In
Brooklyn. |Philadelphia|Baltimore.|Columbus.|Cincinnati.|Louisville|Kansas
          |            |          |         |           |          |City.
----------+------------+----------+---------+-----------+----------+------
----
May  30   |June   13   |June  8   |June  3  |April 17   |April 21  |May
3
          |            |   [1]    |         |           |   [2]    |
 "   30   | "    15    | "   10   | "    4  | "    18   | "    22  | "
4
          |   [1]      |          |         |           |          |   [1]
June  1   | "    16    | "   11   | "    5  | "    19   | "    23  | "
5
   [1]    |   [2]      |          |         |           |          |   [2]
 "    2   | "    17    | "   12   | "    6  | "    20   |June  20  | "
6
   [2]    |            |          |         |   [1]     |          |
Aug.  2   |July  30    |July 26   |July 22  |July  18   | "   22   |Aug.
7
          |            |          |         |           |   [1]    |
 "    3   | "    31    | "   27   | "   23  | "    20   | "    23  | "
8
   [1]    |            |   [1]    |         |   [1]     |   [2]    |
 "    4   |Aug.   1    | "   29   | "   24  | "    21   | "    24  | "
9
   [2]    |            |          |         |   [2]     |          |
Sept. 7   |Sept. 12    |Sept. 3   |Aug. 30  |Oct.  12   |Oct.   8  |Sept.
18
   [1]    |            |          |         |   [1]     |          |
 "    8   | "   14     | "    4   | "   31  | "    13   | "     9  | "
19
   [2]    |   [1]      |          |   [1]   |   [2]     |          |
 "   10   | "   15     | "    5   |Sept. 1  | "    14   | "    10  | "
20
          |   [2]      |          |   [2]   |           |          |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
------
[Footnote 1: Saturday]
[Footnote 2: Sunday]

Kansas City
In       |In          |In        |In       |In         |In         |In
Brooklyn.|Philadelphia|Baltimore.|Columbus.|Cincinnati.|Louisville.|St.
         |            |          |         |           |           |Louis.
---------+------------+----------+---------+-----------+-----------+------
---
June  3  |June  8     |May   30  |June 13  |April 21   |April 17   |May  24
         |   [1]      |          |         |   [2]     |           |
 "    4  | "    9     | "    30  | "   14  | "    22   | "    18   | "   25
         |   [2]      |          |         |           |           |   [1]
 "    5  | "   10     | "    31  | "   15  | "    23   | "    19   | "   26
         |            |          |   [1]   |           |           |   [2]
 "    6  | "   11     |June   1  | "   16  |June  20   | "    20   | "   27
         |            |   [1]    |   [2]   |           |   [1]     |
July 23  |July 27     |July  30  |Aug.  2  | "    21   |July  18   |Aug. 26
         |   [1]      |          |         |           |           |
 "   24  | "   28     | "    31  | "    3  | "    22   | "    20   | "   27
         |   [2]      |          |   [1]   |   [1]     |   [1]     |
 "   25  | "   29     |Aug.   1  | "    4  | "    23   | "    21   | "   28
         |            |          |   [2]   |   [2]     |   [2]     |
Aug. 30  |Sept. 2     |Sept. 12  |Sept. 7  |Oct.   8   |Oct.12     |Oct.  3
         |            |          |   [1]   |           |   [1]     |
 "   31  | "    3     | "    13  | "    8  | "     9   | "    13   | "   5
   [1]   |            |          |   [2]   |           |   [2]     |   [1]
Sept. 1  | "    4     | "    14  | "    9  | "    10   | "    14   | "    6
   [2]   |            |   [1]    |         |           |           |   [2]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Footnote 1: Saturday]
[Footnote 2: Sunday]

        *        *        *        *        *

READY APRIL 10TH.

Spalding's Minor League Guide for 1889
--AND--
College and Amateur Club Annual.
--CONTAINING--
The Statistics of the Championship Contests of the Season of 1888
--OF THE--
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION, CENTRAL LEAGUE, WESTERN ASSOCIATION, TRI-STATE
LEAGUE, SOUTHERN AND TEXAS LEAGUES, NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE, CALIFORNIA LEAGUE,
etc.
--ALSO--
THE OFFICIAL AVERAGES
-OF THE--
AMERICAN COLLEGE LEAGUE, THE INTER-COLLEGIATE ASSOCIATION, MAINE COLLEGE
LEAGUE, NEW YORK STATE LEAGUE, AMATEUR LEAGUE, CHICAGO AMATEUR LEAGUE

--TOGETHER WITH--

The Revised National Agreement for 1889 and the New National Code of
Playing Rules, Schedules, etc.

PRICE 10 CENTS.

PUBLISHERS:

          A. G. SPALDING & BROS.
CHICAGO.--------------------------NEW YORK.

        *        *        *        *        *

A TOUR OF THE WORLD,

as made by

SPALDING'S AMERICAN BASE BALL TEAMS.

A Complete and Interesting History of the Great Trip of the

CHICAGO AND ALL AMERICAN BASE BALL TEAMS,

From CHICAGO to SAN FRANCISCO, to the SANDWICH ISLANDS, to NEW ZEALAND,
to the AUSTRALIAN COLONIES, to CEYLON, INDIA, EGYPT, THE HOLY LAND, and
the great Cities of EUROPE, is being compiled by

HARRY PALMER,

The Official Scorer of the Tour, and will be placed in the hands of the
publishers immediately upon the return of the party to America.

The volume will consist of from 400 to 450 pages, and will be profusely
illustrated.

Seldom, if ever, has the tour of the Globe been made by so large a party
of Americans. The public and private receptions tendered them at every
point have been most brilliant in character, and the trip has abounded
with humorous and interesting incidents, which every American, whether or
not he be a lover of the national game, will enjoy.

The first edition of the book will be limited. Orders for the same will
be placed on file, and the book sent by express to any address C. O. D.,
charges prepaid, and with the privilege of examination.

PRICE:

CLOTH, $3.50
MOROCCO, 5.00

ADDRESS ALL ORDERS TO

HARRY PALMER,
Care Evening Journal,
CHICAGO, ILL.

        *        *        *        *        *

FROM CHICAGO, EAST AND SOUTH
take the
PENNSYLVANIA LINES,
PITTSBURGH, FT. WAYNE AND CHICAGO RAILWAY,
(Fort Wayne Route.)

to Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Harrisburgh, Washington, New
York, And All Eastern Points,

and the

CHICAGO, ST. LOUIS & PITTSBURGH R.R.
(Pan Handle Route,)

to

Columbus, Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Louisville, And All Points South,
and Pittsburgh, and All Points East.

JAS. McCREA, Gen'l Manager, E. A. FORD, Gen'l Pass. Agt.,
Pittsburgh, PA.

C. W. ADAMS, Ass't Gen. Pass. Agt.,
Chicago, ILL.

        *        *        *        *        *

MICHIGAN CENTRAL


"The Niagara Falls Route."

[Illustration: SOLID VESTIBULED TRAINS]

Solid vestibuled trains run over the Michigan Central, "The Niagara Falls
Route." between Chicago and Buffalo. These trains are not only equipped
with the finest Wagner Palace Sleeping-Cars, but are made thoroughly
complete by having Vestibuled Dining, Smoking, First-Class and Baggage
Cars, and although constituting the famous "Limited" of the Michigan
Central, carry all classes of passengers without extra charge. These
trains carry through vestibuled Sleeping Cars between Chicago and New
York, via New York Central & Hudson River Railroad, and between Chicago
and Boston, via New York Central and Boston & Albany Railroads. The
eastbound "Limited" also carries a through Sleeper, Chicago & Toronto (via
Canadian Pacific), where connection is made with Parlor Car for Montreal.
Accommodations secured at the Michigan Central Ticket Offices, No. 67
Clark Street, corner Randolph, and Depot, foot of Lake Street, Chicago.

ASHLAND
M.LS. & W.RY.
ROUTE

The Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Railway.

THROUGH PALACE SLEEPING AND PARLOR CAR LINE

-BETWEEN-

CHICAGO and MILWAUKEE, and APPLETON,
WAUSAU, and ASHLAND, the GOGEBIC,
PENOKEE and MONTREAL IRON and
MINERAL RANGES, HURLEY,
IRONWOOD, BESSEMER
and WAKEFIELD.

THE DIRECT LIKE TO DULUTH,

And the Manufacturing Centers and Lumbering Districts of Central and
Northern Wisconsin, SHEBOYGAN, MANITOWOC, KAUKAUNA, APPLETON and WAUSAU.
Special Inducements and Facilities offered for the Location of
Manufacturing Establishments. Close Connections at Ashland and Duluth for
Northern Pacific and Pacific Coast Points.

        *        *        *        *        *

SPORTSMEN:

The best Fishing and Hunting in the Northwest is reached by the ASHLAND
ROUTE, and Excursion Tickets are sold at reduced rates during proper
seasons.

For MUSCALLONGE, BASS, PIKE, and other varieties, go to the Eagle Waters,
Twin Lakes, and Lake St. Germain, Tomahawk and Pelican Lakes, and all
headquarters of the Wisconsin River.

For BROOK TROUT, go to Watersmeet, Great Trout Brook, the Brule, the
Ontonagon, and Lake Gogebic.

For BLACK BASS, go to Lake Gogebic, the best Bass Fishing in the country.

For MACKINAW TROUT, LANDLOCKED SALMON, go to Island Lake, Black Oak Lake,
Trout Lake.

Send to the General Passenger and Ticket Agent for Descriptive and
Illustrated Publications, Maps, Folders, Game Laws, Time Cards and General
Information.


C.L. RYDER, General Agent.,
114 Clark St., Chicago.

ERNEST VLIET, Gen'l Pass. & Tkt. Agt.,
Milwaukee, Wis.

        *        *        *        *        *

Chicago and North-Western Railway.

OVER 7,000 MILES
Of steel track in Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota,
Nebraska, Dakota and Wyoming, penetrates the Agricultural, Mining and
Commercial Centres of the WEST and NORTHWEST

The Unrivaled Equipment of the Line embraces Sumptuous Dining Cars, New
Wagner and Pullman Sleepers, Superb day Coaches and FAST VESTIBULED TRAINS

Running direct between Chicago, St, Paul and Minneapolis, Council Bluffs
and Omaha, connecting for Portland, Denver, San Francisco and all Pacific
Coast Points.

ONLY LINE TO THE BLACK HILLS

For Tickets, Rates, Maps, Time Tables and full information, apply to any
Ticket Agent or address the Gen'l Passenger Agent, Chicago, Ill.

J. M. WHITMAN,
General Manager.

H. C. WICKER,
Traffic Manager.

E. P. WILSON,
Gen'l Pass. Agt.

OFFICES:

MINNEAPOLIS OFFICE--13 Nicollet House, and C., St. P. M. & O. Depot.

ST. PAUL TICKET OFFICES--159 East Third St., Western Ave. Station,
Palmer House, Grand Pacific Hotel, Wells Street Depot.

DENVER OFFICE--8 Windsor Hotel Block.

COUNCIL BLUFFS TICKET OFFICES--421 Broadway, at Union Pacific
Depot, and C. & N. W. Railway Depot.

OMAHA TICKET OFFICES--1401 Farnam St., and U. P. Depot.

MILWAUKEE TICKET OFFICE--102 Wisconsin St.

DULUTH, MINN.--112 West Superior St.

        *        *        *        *        *

PURCHASE YOUR TICKETS

VIA THE

Burlington Route
C.B.& Q.R.R.

FROM CHICAGO, PEORIA OR ST. LOUIS TO ST. PAUL AND MINNEAPOLIS, CONNECTING
AT MINNEAPOLIS AND ST. PAUL FOR ALL POINTS NORTHWEST. TO COUNCIL BLUFFS
AND INTERMEDIATE POINTS IN IOWA, OR TO OMAHA IT IS THE POPULAR LINE. TO
CHEYENNE IT HAS A DIRECT THROUGH LINE. TO ST. JOSEPH AND TO ATCHISON OR
KANSAS CITY IT IS THE DIRECT LINE. TO DENVER

IT RUNS THREE DAILY THROUGH TRAINS FROM CHICAGO, TWO FROM PEORIA, AND ONE
FROM ST. LOUIS.

        *        *        *        *        *

Tickets via the Burlington Route can be obtained of any coupon Ticket
Agent of connecting lines.

P. S. EUSTIS,
Gen. Passenger & Ticket Agent, Chicago.

THE CHICAGO AND ALTON R.R. IS THE ONLY LINE RUNNING PULLMAN VESTIBULED
TRAINS

--TO--

KANSAS CITY AND ST. LOUIS.

        *        *        *        *        *

Palace Reclining Chair Cars and Ladies' Palace Day Cars Free of Extra
Charge.

Pullman Palace Buffet Sleeping Cars, Pullman Palace Compartment Buffet
Sleeping Cars, Palace Dining Cars, and Smoking Cars.

For Tickets and all information call on or address

R. SOMERVILLE,
City Passenger and Ticket Agent,
195 SOUTH CLARK STREET,--CHICAGO, ILL.

GRAND UNION PASSENGER DEPOT,
Canal Street, between Adams and Madison Streets

CHICAGO, MILWAUKEE & ST. PAUL R'Y.

Electric Lighted Vestibuled Trains to St. Paul and Minneapolis.
Finest Dining Cars in the World.
Through Sleeping Cars to Denver.
The route of the first "Golden Gate Special"
Excursion Tickets to Colorado.
Excursion Tickets to California.
Everything First-Class.
First Class people patronize First-Class Lines.

Ticket Agents everywhere sell Tickets over the Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul Railway.

        *        *        *        *        *

SEASON OF 1889.
BASE BALL POSTERS,
WINDOW HANGERS,
Colored Score Cards,

Again Adopted by

The National Leape and All Principal Associations.

Inclose 25 Cents in Stamps for Sample Set of Twenty-Four Designs.

JOHN B. SAGE, -- Buffalo, N. Y.

The Pullman Buffet Sleeping Car Line

--between--

THE WINTER CITIES OF THE SOUTH

--and--

THE NORTHWESTERN SUMMER RESORTS,

THE MONON ROUTE GIVES

CHOICE OF 21 INTERESTING TOURIST LINES

VIA

Chicago or Michigan City to Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Louisville Burgin,
and the South.

For further information and descriptive pamphlets of Fishing and Hunting
Resorts, etc., address

E. 0. McCORMICK, Gen'l Passenger Agent.

186 Dearborn St., Chicago, Ill.

        *        *        *        *        *

THE SPORTING TIMES

A JOURNAL DEVOTED TO

BASEBALL, THE TURF, AND ALL MANLY SPORTS.

PUBLISHED EVERY SUNDAY BY THE

SPORTING TIMES PUBLISHING CO.,
P.O. BOX 611,
No. 73 Park Row, New York.

IT COVEKS THE ENTIRE COUNTRY.

DeWITT RAY, Editor and Manager.

TERMS:

SUBSCRIPTION, ONE YEAR     $2.00
SUBSCRIPTION, SIX MONTHS    1.00

ALWAYS IN ADVANCE.

ADVERTISING RATES:

OUTSIDE PAGE, 20 CENTS A LINE EACH INSERTION.
INSIDE PAGES, 15 CENTS A LINE EACH INSERTION.
READING NOTICES, 50 CENTS A LINE EACH INSERTION

DISCOUNTS:

Advertisements running 6 months    15 per cent.
Advertisements running 12 months   25 per cent.

The Guaranteed Circulation of THE SPORTING TIMES is

35,000 COPIES EVERY ISSUE.

THE REPRESENTATIVE B. B. PAPER OF AMERICA

THE SPORTING LIFE

Recognized by all Organizations, all Players, and the entire Base Ball
loving public as the BEST BASE BALL JOURNAL PUBLISHED.

It chronicles all sporting events. Nothing escapes it, and it leads in
news gathering. It has the best corps of editors and correspondents ever
organized, and contains more reading matter than any similar paper in the
world.

Has a larger sworn and proved circulation than any other sporting or base
ball paper, or indeed, any number of similar papers combined, in the
country, if not in the world.

The only sporting paper in America which has all the mechanical work
performed under its own roof, and which is printed on its own Web
Perfecting Press, with a capacity of 15,000 printed, cut and folded
complete, papers per hour.

To read It Once Is to Swear by It Forever.

-PUBLISHED BY-

SPORTING LIFE PUBLISHING COMPANY,

34 SOUTH THIRD ST.,
P. O. Box 948, Philadelphia, Pa.
F. C. RICHTER, Editor,
SUBSCRIPTION TERMS:

IN ADVANCE.

ONE YEAR      $ 2.25
SIX MONTHS      1.25
THREE MONTHS     .65
SINGLE COPIES    .O5

For sale by all Newsdealers in the United States and Canada.

Sample Copies Free. Send for one.

        *        *        *        *        *

THE INTER OCEAN

IS PUBLISHED

EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR

--AND--

HOLDS THE FIRST PLACE IN PUBLIC FAVOR.

The Sporting Hews and Dramatic Departments of the INTER OCEAN are the
Ablest and Most Complete of any paper in Chicago.

THE SUNDAY INTER OCEAN

IS THE

Best Literary Publication in America.

The Daily Inter Ocean, per Year,    $8.00
The Sunday Inter Ocean, Per Year,    2.00

ADDRESS

THE INTER OCEAN,

CHICAGO

The Inter Ocean gives a Prize of $100 to the person or persons guessing
the correct standing of the League Clubs at the end of the season. For
blanks apply to the Inter Ocean.

        *        *        *        *        *

THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE.

THE WESTERN SPORTING AUTHORITY.

THE SUNDAY EDITION OF THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE and the DAILY EDITION
throughout the playing season of 1889, will be found, as heretofore,
indispensable to those who desire accurate, reliable and comprehensive
base ball records and reports.

Every club and club-room should keep THE SUNDAY TRIBUNE on file.

THE TURF DEPARTMENT

Of THE TRIBUNE is universally admitted to be without an equal, and during
1889 it will be still further improved. Special telegraphic reports of the
principal running and trotting meetings will be furnished, and particular
attention be given to the performances of the American horses in England.

In other departments of sport THE TRIBUNE will maintain the superiorly it
has so long enjoyed.

SUNDAY EDITION, 24 Pages, per year, $2.00
DAILY TRIBUNE, including Sunday,     8.00

Address

THE TRIBUNE,

CHICAGO, ILL.

        *        *        *        *        *

TREMONT HOUSE,

CHICAGO.

The Proprietors of the Tremont would respectfully solicit the patronage
of the League and other traveling Base Ball Clubs, for the season of 1889.
We offer a special rate of


$2.50 Per Day,

And refer to all the League Clubs who have made their home with us, also
to Messrs. A. G. Spalding & Bros., 108 Madison St.

JOHN A. RICE & CO.

M. VAN S. RICE, Manager


        *        *        *        *        *
[Illustration:  Celebrate Spalding's Baseballs]

Each of following styles are put up in separate box, and sealed.

                                                           To Clubs.
                                                           Each.  Per doz.
No. 1.  SPALDING'S LEAGUE BALL, as adopted by the National
        League; the finest ball made                       $1.50  $15.00
No. 1A. SPALDING'S ASSOCIATION BALL                         1.25   13.00
No. 1B  SPALDING'S BOY'S LEAGUE BALL, a first class ball
        for boys, made like our League Ball                 1.00   11.00
No. 2.  SPALDING'S PROFESSIONAL DEAD BALL, white. The best
        dead ball ever made                                 1.00   11.00
No. 3.  SPALDING'S AMATEUR DEAD BALL, white. Especially
        adapted for school nines, and for practice           .75    8.50
No. 3R. SPALDING'S AMATEUR DEAD BALL, red                    .75    8.50
No. XX  SPALDING'S AMATEUR LIVELY BALL, white. A first-
        class lively ball                                    .75    8.50

All above balls are fully warranted.

FINE HORSEHIDE COVER 50-CENT BALLS.
No. 5.   SPALDING'S KING OF THE DIAMOND, white. Horsehide
         cover, regulation size                                 50   5.00
No. 5B.  SPALDING'S BOY'S PROFESSIONAL BALL, white
         Horsehide cover, junior size ball                     .50   5.00

HORSEHIDE COYER 25-CENT BILLS.
No. 7.   SPALDING'S BOY'S FAVORITE. Regulation size and
         weight. Horsehide cover                               .25   2.75
No. 7B.  SPALDING'S LEAGUE JUNIOR. Horsehide cover, junior
         size                                                  .25   2.75

REGULATION SIZE 20-CENT BALLS.
No. 8.   SPALDING'S EUREKA BALL, white. Regulation size and
         weight                                                .20   2.00
No. 9.   SPALDING'S RATTLER BALL, white. Nearly regulation
          size                                                 .10   1.00
No. 9B.  SPALDING'S BOY'S DEAD. An 8-inch ball for boys        .10   1.00


THE BOSS JUVENILE 5-CENT BALL.
No. 10.   SPALDING'S BOSS BALL, large size, 5 cent ball,
          best in the market                                    50   .50

If you cannot obtain these balls of your local dealer send the price for
sample ball and we will mail free of all charges.

SPALDING'S TRADE-MARKED BATS.

Spalding's Trade-Marked bats were first introduced in 1877, and they have
gradually grown in popularity until now they are used almost exclusively
by all prominent professional and amateur players.

The demand for different styles and lengths of bats has changed as the
batting and pitching rules have changed. Our models have changed so from
year to year that bats of the present are very different from those of a
few years since. We have adopted an entirely new set of models for 1889,
and each crate of our trade-marked bats has four different models and as
many different lengths.

All timber used in these bats is allowed to season from one to two years
before being turned, and the result is we are enabled to make much lighter
and stronger bats than when timber is hastily "kiln-dried," as done by all
manufacturers of cheap goods.

Bach bat is turned by hand, and when found to answer all the requirements
as to shape, size, weight and soundness, the trade-mark is stained on each
bat to insure its genuineness. Each and every one of our trade marked
bats, after it is completed, is carefully weighed, and the weight in
ounces stamped under the trade-mark.

The success and popularity of these bats, which is due to the great care
taken in their manufacture, has brought out many cheap imitations, and we
would caution the trade to see that the Spalding trade-mark is stamped on
each bat. The special attention of professional players is called to our
new "Wagon Tongue Brand" No. 3-0 Bat.

PRICES.
                                                             To Clubs
                                                             Each.   Per
                                                                     doz.
No. 3-0.  SPALDING'S SPECIAL BLACK END "WAGON TONGUE" BAT.
          This is a new special quality Bat, selected and
          manufactured with more care than any bat made.
          Nothing but the very best clear second growth
          thoroughly seasoned ash is used. The bats are
          turned to special models as used by the leading
          League batters. _Oriental Finish_, which is
          very durable, and gives a pleasant firm hold for
          the hands. Each bat carefully weighed, and trade-
          marked, and inclosed in a strong paper bag         $1.00  10.00
No. 2-0.  SPALDING'S SPECIAL BLACK BAND LEAGUE BAT, made out
          of the choicest selected second growth white ash.
          Each bat is carefully weighed and the weight in
          ounces stamped under the Trade-mark; they are
          lathe polished and finished in the highest
          possible manner, and we guarantee it to be
          superior to any bat made by other manufacturers.
          Granulated handle, incased in a strong paper bag.   .75   7.50
No. 0.-   SPALDING'S BLACK BAND LEAGUE BAT, made from
          selected straight grained white ash; highly
          polished. Each bat incased in strong paper bag;
          and the weight stamped under trade-mark.            .50   5.50
No. 1.    SPALDING'S TRADE-MARKED ASH BAT, made on four
          different models; finished with three coats of
          best shellac, and lathe polished. Each bat has the
          weight stamped under Trade-mark.                    .25   3.00


SPALDING'S LIGHTWOOD BATS.

We wish to call the attention of the trade to the elegant manner in which
we are finishing our lightwood bats; we have entirely changed the style
and finish of these bats in a way that is sure to win the approval of
players.

                                                             To Clubs
                                                             Each.   Per
                                                                     doz.
No. 3.   SPALDING'S BLACK BAND BASSWOOD BAT, is made from
         selected timber. Each bat has weight stamped under
         Trademark, and is finished in elegant manner;
         incased in strong paper bag.                       $.30   $ 3.00
No. 4.   SPALDING'S BLACK BAND WILLOW BAT, highly finished.
         Each bat has weight stamped under Trade-mark, and
         is guaranteed to be the best light wood bat made;
         incased in strong paper bag.                        .50     5.50

SPALDING'S TRADE-MARKED BOYS' BATS.

The demand among the younger generation for a Trade-marked Spalding bat
has been so great that we have taken great pains in getting out a line of
bats for the boys as near as possible like the men's in shape, quality and
general appearance.

                                                           To Clubs
                                                           Each.   Per
                                                                   doz.
No. 0B.   SPALDING'S BLACK BAND TRADE-MARKED BOY'S ASH BAT.
          This bat is highly finished, made from selected
          timber, and finished in same manner as our No. 00
          bat stamped weight; incased in paper bag, 30-34
          inches.                                         $  .30   $ 3.00
No. 1B    SPALDING'S TRADE-MARKED BOY'S ASH BAT, finished
          same style as No. 1; 28 to 30 in.                  .25     2.50
No. 3B.   SPALDING'S TRADE-MARKED BOYS' BASSWOOD BAT, made
          after same models as our No. 3 bat, only
          proportionately smaller; nicely finished; 28 to 32
          inches.                                            .25     2.50

SPALDING'S TRADE-MARKED FANCY BATS.

Owing to large demand for fancy bats, three years ago we placed on the
market our line of Trade-marked Fancy bats, which are superior in every
way to any line of fancy bats ever offered to the trade.

                                                           To Clubs
                                                           Each.   Per
                                                                   doz.
No. AA.   SPALDING'S TRADE-MARKED FANCY ASH BAT, mahogany
          finish, with white band Trade-mark;
          granulated handle; stamped weight; incased in
          strong paper bag.                               $  .75   $ 7.50
No. BB.   SPALDING'S TRADE-MARKED FANCY BASSWOOD BAT, same
          finish as the above.                               .75     7.50

POLISHED, STAINED AND PLAIN BATS.

                                                             Each.   Per
                                                                    doz.
No. 21.   POLISHED ASH BATS, for men.                      $  .25  $ 2.5O
No. 24.   POLISHED AMERICAN WILLOW BATS, for men              .25    2.50
No. 5O.   ROSEWOOD FINISH MEN'S BATS, Gilt Band               .35    3.00
No. 5O B. ROSEWOOD FINISH BOYS' BATS, Gilt Band               .20    2.00
No. 53.   POLISHED MAPLE, Colored Band, Youths, 30-32 inch.   .10    1.20
No. 56.   STAINED AND POLISHED MAPLE, Black Handle, Youths'
          30-32 inch.                                         .10    1.20
No. 54.   BOYS' MAPLE, Colored Band, 26-28 inch.               .05    .60

If you cannot obtain these bats from your local dealer send your order
direct to us.


SPALDING'S TRADE-MARKED CATCHERS' MASK.

The suit for infringement on Catchers' Masks brought against us by F. W.
Thayer of Boston was, after a two years' litigation, decided against us in
the U. S. District Court, and in settlement for back damages we arranged
to protect all of our customers.

Ball players and dealers in Base Ball Goods are cautioned against buying
any Catchers' Masks unless made under license from Thayer, and plainly
stamped "Manufactured under Thayer's Patent."

At present it would be considered unsafe and even dangerous for a catcher
to face the swift underhand throwing of the present day unless protected
by a reliable mask. The increased demand for these goods has brought
manufacturers into the field who, having no reputation to sustain, have
vied with each other to see how _cheaply_ they could make a so-called
mask, and in consequence have ignored the essential qualification,
_strength_. A cheaply made, inferior quality of mask is much worse than no
protection at all, for a broken wire, or one that will not stand the force
of the ball without caving in, is liable to disfigure a player for life.
Our trade-marked masks are made of the very best hard wire, plated to
prevent rusting, and well trimmed, and every one is a thorough face
protector. We make them in four grades, as described below:

Beware of counterfeits. _None genuine without our trade-mark stamped on
each mask._

[Illustration: No. 3-0 Mask.]

[Illustration: No. 2-0 Mask.]


No. 3-0.  SPALDING'S NEW PATENTED NECK-PROTECTING MASK.
          This mask has a peculiar shaped extension at the
          bottom which affords the same protection to the
          neck as the mask does to the face. It does not
          interfere in the slightest degree with the free
          movement of the head, and is the only mask made
          which affords perfect protection to a catcher. The
          entire mask is constructed of the best hardened
          wire, extra heavy padded with goat hair, and the
          padding faced with the best imported dogskin,
          which is impervious to perspiration, and always
          soft and pliable,                                  each.   $4.00
No. 2-0.  SPALDING'S SPECIAL LEAGUE MASK, used by all
          leading professional catchers, extra heavy wire,
          well padded with goat hair, and the padding faced
          with the best imported dogskin, which is
          impervious to perspiration, and retains its
          pliability and softness                                    $3.50
No. 1-0.  SPALDING'S REGULATION LEAGUE MASK, made of heavy
          wire, well padded and faced with horsehide,
          warranted first-class in every respect.                    $3.00
No. 1.    SPALDING'S BOYS' LEAGUE MASK, made of heavy wire,
          equally as heavy in proportion to size as the No.
          2-0 mask. It is made to fit a boy's face, and
          gives the same protection as the League Mask.               2.50


AMATEUR MASKS.

[Illustration: Amateur Mask.]

To meet the demand for good masks at a low price, we have manufactured a
line of amateur masks, which is superior to any mask in the market at the
same price. We do not guarantee these masks and believe that our Trade-
Marked Masks are worth more than the difference in price.

No. A.  AMATEUR MASK, made the same size and general style as the
        League Mask, but with lighter wire, and faced with
        leather. (We guarantee this mask to be superior to so-
        called League or professional masks sold by other
        manufacturers.)                                           $1.75
No. B.  BOYS' AMATEUR MASK, similar to No. A Mask, only made
        smaller to fit a boy's face.                               1.50


Any of the above masks mailed post-paid on receipt of price.

SPALDING'S PATENT CELLULOID UMPIRE INDICATOR,

[Illustration: ]

As shown in the above cut, is intended for the use of BASE BALL UMPIRES
and SCORERS to keep tally of the number of Strikes and Balls that may be
called. The illustration, which represents the exact size of the
Indicator, gives a good idea of its construction and mode of handling. It
can be easily operated by the thumb or finger while held in the palm of
the hand. It has been highly recommended by all League and Association
umpires who have seen it.

Price, each   50c

By mail postpaid on receipt of price.

CATCHERS' GLOVES.


Spalding's Trade-Marked Catchers' Gloves.

After considerable expense and many experiments we have finally perfected
a Catcher's Glove that meets with general favor from professional catchers.

The old style of open backed gloves introduced by us several years ago is
still adhered to, but the quality of material and workmanship has been
materially improved, until now we are justified in claiming the best line
of catchers' gloves in the market. These gloves do not interfere with
throwing, can be easily put on and taken off, and no player subject to
sore hands should be without a pair. Our new patent seamless palm glove is
admittedly the finest glove ever made, and is used by all professional
catchers. We make them in ten different grades, as follows:


Price of Full Left-Hand Gloves.


No. 3-0.   Spalding's Special League Catchers' Gloves. Patented, both
           gloves without seams in palm. Full left-hand back stop
           glove, made of heaviest Indian-tanned or drab buckskin,
           the very best that can be produced. The full left-hand
           glove is extra padded and sole leather finger tips to
           prevent the low curve balls from breaking or otherwise
           injuring the fingers. The right-hand glove is made with
           open back and fingerless, thoroughly padded. We especially
           recommend this glove for catchers. Each pair packed in
           separate box.
$5.00
No. 4-0.   Spalding's Special League Catchers' or Fielders' Gloves,
           full left-hand soft-tips, lined, drab color buckskin.
$5.00
No. 2-0.   Spalding's League Regulation Catchers' Gloves full left-
           hand, with tips, good quality buckskin, same style of
           gloves as 3-0, not quite so heavy.
$3.50
No. 3.A.   Full Left-Hand "Spring Buck" with sole leather tips.       $3.00
No. A.     Full left-hand buckskin without tips.
$2.50
No. AA.    Full left-hand oiled tan sheepskin, without tips.
$1.25

IRWIN'S GLOVES

WE HAVE BEEN MADE SOLE AGENTS FOR THESE GLOVES.

No. 25.   Irwin's Celebrated Catchers' Gloves   $5.00
No. 25A.     "       "       Infielder's   "     3.50

INFIELDERS' GLOVES.

No. XX.   Spalding's Drab Buck Infielders' Gloves   2.50
No. X.        "     White "      "          "       2.00

BASE BALL FINGERLESS GLOVES OPEN BACK

[Illustration: No. 1-0 Glove.]

No. 1-0.  Spalding's League Cat'hrs Gloves made of extra heavy
          Indian-tanned buck, and carefully selected with special
          reference to the hard service required of them, open back,
          both hands fingerless, well padded, and fully warranted.
          We especially recommend this glove for catchers            2.50
No. 1     Spalding's Professional Gloves, made of Indian-tanned
          buckskin, open back, well padded, but not quite as heavy
          as the No. 0                                               2.00


[Illustration: Nos. E. and F.]

No. B.  Spalding's Amateur Gloves, made of buckskin, open back,
        well padded and adapted for amateur players,            1.50
No. C.  Spalding's Practice Gloves, made of buckskin, open back,
        well padded                                             1.00
No. D.  Open back, a good glove at the price, made of light
        material.                                                .75
No. E.  Boy's size, cheap open back glove.                       .50
No. F.  Youth's size, cheap open back glove.                     .25

Any of the above Gloves mailed postpaid on receipt of price. In ordering,
please give size of ordinary dress glove usually worn.


SPALDING'S SPECIAL HAND MADE KANGAROO BALL SHOE. IMPROVED FOR 1889.

No. 2-0 ... Price, $7.00.

We now have on the third floor of our New York store a thoroughly
equipped Shoe Factory for the manufacture of fine Base Ball and Athletic
Shoes. This department of our business is under the immediate charge and
supervision of Wm. Dowling, who for several years past has enjoyed the
reputation of being the leading maker of Athletic Shoes in New York. We
employ in this department the most skilful workmen, and use only the very
best material, and are prepared to take special orders and make a special
last for professional players.

The special attention of Ball players is called to our new genuine
KANGAROO BASE BALL SHOE.

The above cut represents this Shoe, which is made from selected genuine
Kangaroo skin, all hand sewed, slipper heel, cut low in front, and wide,
so they can be laced tight or loose as the player likes.

Each pair is provided with porpoise laces, and the whole Shoe made with
reference to comfort and the hard usage required of it.

Our new Hand Forged Shoe Plates--for toe and heel--will be riveted on
when required, without additional expense.


HOW TO MEASURE.

MEASUREMENT BLANKS will be furnished on application, or a player can take
a piece of manilla paper of sufficient size, and by following the
directions herein given, can take his own measure.

Place the foot flat on the paper, and with a pencil draw around the foot
close to it. Then take other measurements as shown in the cut.

        LEFT FOOT.

ANKLE                INCHES.
HEEL                    "
INSTEP                  "
BALL                    "

Ball Players will bear in mind that we make a special last for each man,
which will be kept for future use. Satisfaction both as to fit and quality
of shoe guaranteed.


SPALDING'S

Trade-Marked Base Ball Shoes.

SPALDING'S SPECIAL LEAGUE SHOE.

      Per pair.
No. 0.  Spalding's Special League Shoe. Used by League Players.
        Made of choicest selected Calf, skin, with natural side
        out. Hand Sewed and Warranted, superior to any Shoe on
        the market except our No. 20 Shoe                          $6.00

[Illustration: No. 0.]

No. 1.  Spalding's Special Canvas Base Ball Shoe. Hand made, the
        finest Canvas Shoe made                                     5.00

[Illustration: No. 1]

AMATEUR, OR PRACTICE SHOE.

No. 3  Amateur, or Practice Shoe. Good quality, canvas strap over
       ball                                                        $2.00

[Illustration: No. 3]

AMATEUR BASE BALL SHOE FOR BOYS.

No. 3X.  Amateur Base Ball Shoe. Second quality canvas             $1.50
No. 5.   Third quality canvas Shoe                                  1.00

OXFORD TIE BASE BALL SHOE

No. 4.  Oxford Tie Base Ball Shoe, Low cut, canvas                 $2.00

SPALDING'S SHOE PLATES.

We have experienced more difficulty in the manufacture of a Shoe Plate
than any other article that goes to make up a ball player's outfit, but at
last we are prepared to offer something that will give the player
satisfactory service.

No. 3-0.  Spalding's Extra Special Hand Forged Steel Plates,
          polished and plated, per pair,                          $0.75
No. 2-0.  Spalding's Hand Forged Steel Heel Plates, per pair,       .50
No. 0.    Spalding's Tempered Steel Shoe Plate, made of imported
          steel, and warranted not to bend or break; put up with
          screws.                                                   .50
No. 1.    Professional Steel Shoe Plate, similar in shape     per
          and style to the No. 0 Plate, put up with screws   pair   .25
No. 2.    Amateur Steel Shoe Plate, put up with screws        per
                                                             pair   .15

PITCHER'S TOE PLATE.

Made of heavy brass, to be worn on the toe of the right shoe. A thorough
protection to the shoe, and a valuable assistant in pitching. All
professionals use them.

Each      .50c.

Any of above plates sent post-paid on receipt of price.

SPALDING'S BASE BALL STOCKINGS.
                                                                   Per doz.
No. 2-0. Spalding's New Linen Sole Base Ball Stockings.           $15.00
No. 1-0. Spalding's New Linen Sole, Bicycle or Tennis Stockings.   13.20
Special. League Regulation, made of the finest worsted yarn. The
         following colors can be obtained: White, Light Blue,
         Navy Blue, Scarlet, Gray, Green, Old Gold, Brown.         18.00
No 1.    Fine Quality Woolen Stockings, Scarlet, Blue or Brown.    12.00
No. 2.   Good Quality Woolen Stockings, Scarlet, Blue or Brown.     9.00
No. 3.   Second Quality Woolen Stockings, Scarlet or Blue           6.00
No. 4.   Cotton                                                     3.50
No. 5.     "                                                        2.50


Sample pair mailed on receipt of price.

BAT BAGS.

No. 0.   LEAGUE CLUB BAT BAG, made of sole leather, name on
         side, to hold 11/2 dozen bats                     each,   $15.00

No. 1.   CANVAS BAT BAG, heavy waterproof canvas, leather
         ends, to hold a dozen bats                      each,     $ 5.00

No. 2.   CANVAS BAT BAG, heavy waterproof canvas, leather
          end, to hold 1 dozen bats                       each,    $ 4.00

No. 01.  INDIVIDUAL LEATHER BAT BAG, for 2 bats, Spalding's
         design, used by the players of the Chicago Club,   each,  $ 4.00
No. 02.  INDIVIDUAL CANVAS BAT BAG, heavy water proof
         canvas, leather cap at both ends.                  each,    1.50
No. 03.  INDIVIDUAL CANVAS BAT BAG, heavy canvas, leather
         cap at one end.                                    each,    1.00



        *        *        *        *        *

BASES.

No. 0. League Club Bases, made of extra canvas, stuffed
       and quilted complete, with straps and spikes,
       without home plate.
                                              Per set of three $7.50
No. 1. Canvas Bases, with straps and spikes, without home
       Plate                                                    5.00
No. 2. Cheap Canvas Bases, with straps and spikes,
       complete, without home plate.                            5.00

Rubber Home Plate.    each   7.50
Marble Home Plate.     "     3.00

BASE BALL UNIFORMS.

We offer our regular line of Flannel Uniforms, and in addition offer a
new style of heavy knit suits, such as was first worn by Chicago Club
during 1887-1888. They are well adapted for warm weather, and are very
neat and elastic. We make in one quality only; any color.

NO. 2-0 KNIT BASE BALL UNIFORM.

Consisting of--

No. 2-0.   Knit Shirt, with collar, and with name on
            breast.                                   $5.00
 "  2-0.   Knit Pants, very strongly reinforced        4.50
Special quality Stockings                              1.50
No. 0.     Cap                                         1.00
Special quality Belt                                    .50
   Necktie to match trimmings.                         ----
   Complete without shoes                            $12.50

NO. O UNIFORM.

NO. O. BEST QUALITY LEAGUE OR ASSOCIATION CLUB UNIFORM.
The flannel used in this uniform is manufactured exclusively for us, and
which we have used for the past six years. For the durability of the
material and superiority of the styles and workmanship, we refer to all
clubs who have used our uniforms. We have made uniforms for the following
leading clubs in

THE LEAGUE--NEW YORK, CHICAGO, BOSTON, DETROIT, WASHINGTON, INDIANAPOLIS,
PITTSBURGH.

THE ASSOCIATION--ST. Louis, BROOKLYN, CINCINNATI, METROPOLITAN,
LOUISVILLE, CLEVELAND.

And for the majority of the clubs of the N. E. League, International
League, Southern League, Western League, N. W. League and others. We have
fifteen different styles or colors. Send for sample card.

No. 0.    Quality Shirts, any style   Each,   $5.00
 "  0.       "    Pants,   "   "       "       4.50
Special      "    Stockings            "       1.50
No. 0.       "    Caps                 "       1.00
Special      "    Belt                 "        .50
   Necktie to match trimmings.                 ----
Uniform complete without shoes               $12.50

Extra for Padded pants            Each pair,   1.50


NO. 1 UNIFORM.

NO. 1 UNIFORM. The flannel used in this uniform is the same quality as
the No. 0 grade, but lighter in weight. We have fifteen styles and colors,
as follows: No. 16, White; No. 17, Yale Gray; No. 18, Drab, mixed; No. 19,
Shaker Gray; No. 20, Steel, mixed; No. 21, Navy Blue; No. 22, Dark Brown;
No. 23, Maroon; No. 24, Royal Blue; No. 25, Old Gold, No. 26, Scarlet; No.
17, Green; No. 28, Light Brown; No. 29, Dark Gray; No. 30, Light Gray.

                                             PRICE.
No. 1.   Quality Shirts, any style   Each,   $4.00
 "  1.      "    Pants,   "   "       "       3.75
 "  1.      "    Stockings            "       1.00
 "  1st     "    Caps                 "        .75
"  0 or 2   "    Belt                 "        .50
   Necktie to match trimmings.                ----
Uniform complete without shoes              $10.00

Extra for Padded pants           Each pair,   1.50


NO. 2 UNIFORM.

NO. 2 UNIFORM. Made of 4-1/2 oz. twilled flannel, in the following
colors: No. 31, White; No. 32, Yale Gray; No. 33. Shaker Gray; No. 34
Steel, mixed; No. 35, Navy Blue.

                                             PRICE.
No. 2.   Quality Shirts, any style   Each,   $3.00
 "  2.      "    Pants,   "   "       "       1.75
 "  2.      "    Stockings            "        .75
 "  2d      "    Caps                 "        .60
"  1 or 3   "    Belt                 "        .40
   Necktie to match trimmings.                ----
Uniform complete without shoes               $7.50

Extra for Padded pants           Each pair,   1.50


NO. 3 UNIFORM.

NO. 3 UNIFORM. Made of three colors of flannel-White, Gray, Navy Blue.
Heavy and strong. The best value at the price.

                                            PRICE.
No. 3.   Quality Shirts, any style   Each,   $2.00
 "  3.      "    Pants,   "   "       "       1.75
 "  3.      "    Stockings            "        .50
 "  3.      "    Caps                 "        .50
"  3 or 4   "    Belt                 "        .25
                                             -----
Uniform complete without shoes               $5.00

Extra for Padded pants          Each pair,    1.00


NO. 4 UNIFORM.

Made of a White Shaker flannel and a Gray Cotton Cloth.

                                                       PRICE.
No. 4.   Quality Shirts, plain, pleat or lace   Each,   $1.64
 "  4.      "    Pants,                          "       1.25
 "  4.      "    Stockings                       "        .25
Cotton Flannel Cap, lined                        "        .35
"   4   Belt                                     "        .15
                                                       ------
Uniform complete without shoes                          $3.50

Extra for Padded pants                     Each pair,     .75


Special Measurement Blanks, Samples of Flannel and Belt Webbing for all
of above Uniforms furnished upon application.

ATHLETIC CLOTHING.

Our facilities for manufacturing Base Ball, Cricket, Lawn Tennis,
Boating, Bicycle and all other styles of Uniforms for athletic and
sporting purposes, are unequaled.

In this department we employ both at Chicago and New York a thoroughly
practical and scientific cutter, one who is fully capable of making fine
clothing for ordinary wear, but is especially educated in the cutting of
Athletic Clothing. We would urge clubs not to make the mistake of
entrusting the making of their uniforms to local dealers, whose experience
in this kind of work is necessarily limited.

BASE BALL SHIRTS.

No.0.  League Club Shirts, any style   Each,   $5.00
 " 1.  First Quality  "       "          "      4.00
 " 2.  Second  "      "       "          "      3.00
 " 3.  Third   "      "       "          "      2.00
 " 4.  Fourth  " lace or button only     "      1.60

For description of Flannels used in making these Shirts, see Complete
Uniforms.

TO MEASURE FOR SHIRT.

Size of collar worn, length of sleeve from shoulder seam to wrist with
arm raised and bent, size around chest.

Send for special measurement blank.

BASE BALL PANTS.
No. 0.  League Club Pants, any style   Each,  $4.50
 "  1.  First Quality  "       "        "      3.75
 "  2.  Second  "      "       "        "      2.75
 "  3.  Third   "      "       "        "      1.75
 "  4.  Fourth  "      "       "        "      1.25

                                                                 Each Pair.
For padding and Quilting No. 0, 1 or 2 Quality at hips and knees  $1.50
 "      "     "    "       " 3 Quality at hips and knees           1.00
 "      "     "    "       " 4      "   "   "    "    "             .75

TO MEASURE FOR PANTS.

Outseam from waistband to 8 inches below knee. Inseam from crotch to 8
inches below knee, around waist, around hips. Send for our special
measurement blank.

GRAY'S Patent Body Protector.


We now have the sole agency for this most useful device ever invented for
the protection of catchers or umpires This body protector renders it
impossible for the catcher to be injured while playing close to the
batter. It is made of best rubber and inflated with air, and is very light
and pliable, and does not interfere in any way with the movement of the
wearer, either in turning, stooping or throwing. No catcher should be
without one of these protectors. When not in use the air can be let out,
and the protector rolled in a very small space.

No 0   Extra heavy professional   $10.00
No 1   Standard Amateur           $ 6.00

        *        *        *        *        *

CATCHERS' AND UMPIRES' BREAST PROTECTOR.

This supplies a long felt want for the protection of Catchers and Umpires
exposed to the swift underhand throwing. They are nicely made, well padded
and quilted, and used by nearly all professional Catchers and Umpires.

No A   Chamois and Canvas Body Protector   $3.00
 " B   Leather Body Protector              $5.00

[Illustration: No. 5.  4 Qualities.]
[Illustration: No. 13.]
[Illustration: No. 3.  3 Qualities.]
[Illustration: No. 19.]
[Illustration: No. 1.  1 Quality.]
[Illustration: Cheap Muslin.]

BASE BALL CAPS

[Illustration: No. 21.  5 Qualities.]
[Illustration: No. 7.]
[Illustration: No. 21.  Cheap Flannel.]
[Illustration: No. 11.]


BASE BALL HATS AND CAPS.

Our line of Base Ball Hats and Caps is unequaled for quality, style,
workmanship and variety. Please note carefully before ordering what styles
and colors we furnish in each quality, so there can be no delay in filling
orders.

0 QUALITY--This quality we make in any style from the same flannel that
we use in League Uniforms. Colors, white, red, royal blue, navy blue,
brown, maroon, old gold and nine patterns of grays, stripes and checks, as
shown on our No. 0 Sample Card of Uniforms.

1ST QUALITY--This quality we make in any style and of the following
colors: White, red, royal blue, navy blue, brown, maroon, old gold, green,
or any of the grays and mixes, as shown in our No. 1 Uniform Sample Card.

2D QUALITY--Any style. Colors, white, red, royal blue, navy blue, light
gray, medium gray, dark gray.

3D QUALITY--Any style, except hats; same colors as 2d quality.

4TH QUALITY--Any style, except hats, and No. 5, Chicago style; colors
same as 2d and 3d qualities.

CHEAP FLANNEL CAPS--Made in Style 21 only; colors, white, red, or royal
blue.

CHEAP MUSLIN CAPS--Style 19 only; color, white, red or royal blue.

NO. 1. STYLE CAP--We make this cap from a special imported striped
flannel, of which we carry in stock the following patterns in 3/4 and
1 1/4 inch stripes: Black and white, maroon and white, royal blue and
white, blue and black, black and scarlet, black and orange.

                      |0 Quality, (For colors see above)           |$2.00
NO. 3. B.B. HAT       |1st  "       "     "       "                | 1.50
                      |2d   "       "     "       "                | 1.25
----------------------+--------------------------------------------+----
NO. 1. PARTI-COLORED CAPS--1st quality 3/4 and 1-1/4 inch stripes. | 1.00
----------------------+--------------------------------------------+----
                      |0 Quality, (For colors see above)           | 1.00
NO. 5. CHICAGO CAP    |1st  "       "     "       "                |  .75
Plain or with bands.  |2d   "       "     "       "                |  .65
                      |3d   "       "     "       "                |  .50
----------------------+--------------------------------------------+----
                      |0 Quality, (For colors see above)           | 1.00
                      |1st  "       "     "       "                |  .75
NO 7. Boston Style    |2d   "       "     "       "                |  .65
CAP                   |3d   "       "     "       "                |  .50
                      |4th  "       "     "       "                |  .40
----------------------+--------------------------------------------+----
                      |0 Quality, (For colors see above)           | 1.00
                      |1st  "       "     "       "                |  .75
NO. 11. JOCKEY SHAPE  |2d   "       "     "       "                |  .65
CAP                   |3d   "       "     "       "                |  .50
                      |4th  "       "     "       "                |  .40
----------------------+--------------------------------------------+----
                      |0 Quality, (For colors see above)           | 1.00
                      |1st  "       "     "       "                |  .75
NO. 13. BOSTON STYLE  |2d   "       "     "       "                |  .65
CAP, with Star.       |3d   "       "     "       "                |  .50
                      |4th  "       "     "       "                |  .40
----------------------+--------------------------------------------+----
                      |0 Quality, (For colors see above)           | 1.00
                      |1st  "       "     "       "                |  .75
NO. 19. SKULL CAP     |2d   "       "     "       "                |  .65
                      |3d   "       "     "       "                |  .50
                      |4th  "       "     "       "                |  .40
----------------------+--------------------------------------------+----
                      |0 Quality, (For colors see above)           | 1.00
                      |1st  "       "     "       "                |  .75
NO. 21. COLLEGE STYLE |2d   "       "     "       "                |  .65
CAP                   |3d   "       "     "       "                |  .50
                      |4th  "       "     "       "                |  .40
----------------------+--------------------------------------------+----
CHEAP FLANNEL CAPS    |Lined, (for colors see above)               |  .25
                      |Unlined,    "       "    "                  |  .15
----------------------+--------------------------------------------+----
CHEAP MUSLIN CAPS,    |Unlined                         |Per doz.   | 1.20


SPALDING'S SCORE BOOK

Spalding's Pocket and Club Score Book continues to be the popular score
book, and is used by all the leading scorers and base ball reporters.
They are adapted for the spectator of ball games, who scores for his own
amusement, as well as the official club scorer, who records the minutest
detail. By this system, the art of scoring can be acquired in a single
game.

Full instructions, with the latest League rules, accompany each book.

[Illustration: Score Book page.]

The above represents a page in our Score Book, greatly reduced. The
diamond in the center of the square represents the base ball field. The
home base is at the bottom of diamond, the first base at right side, etc.
The spaces in each corner of the square are intended to be used in scoring
whatever may have happened to batter or base runner on the line between
the two bases forming a boundary of said space.

PRICES.

POCKET.
                                                    EACH.
No. 1.   Paper Cover, 7 games                      $ .10
No. 2.   Board Cover, 22 games                       .25
No. 3.   Board Cover, 46 games                       .50
Score Cards                                          .05
Reporter's Score Book, pocket size, leather bound   1.00

CLUB BOOKS.
No. 4.   Large Size, 30 games                      $1.00
No. 5.     "    "    60 games                       1.75
No. 6.    "     "    90 games                       2.50
No. 7.    "     "   120 games                       3.00

Mailed upon receipt of price.


SPALDING'S WAGON TONGUE BATS

[Illustration]

Are made of the finest straight grained, well seasoned, second growth Ash
Sticks. All timber must be seasoned at least two years, and free from
knots or imperfections. They are pronounced superior to anything, in the
way of a bat, ever brought out, both as to quality of timber, model and
finish. Special attention is called to the "Oriental Finish" put on these
bats which enables the batter to get a firm grip and renders the custom of
scraping the bat unnecessary. They are made from models of the actual bats
used by the most skillful batters in the League and Association. These
bats were used last year by all the prominent batters in the leading
Leagues and during the World's Series nine-tenths of the bats on the field
were WAGON TONGUE BRAND. Beware of cheap imitations, the only genuine
WAGON TONGUE BAT has our TRADEMARK; all others are counterfeits. These
bats are intended especially for Professional Players, and we urge Club
Managers to place their orders as early as possible, to insure a supply,
as the quantity made is necessarily limited.

PRICE TO CLUBS:    Per Doz.    $10.00.    Each.    $1.00.

108 MADISON ST,  A. G. Spaulding & Bros.  241 BROADWAY,
CHICAGO                                      NEW YORK


[Illustration: SPALDING'S OFFICIAL LEAGUE BALL, as represented in above
illustration is made in very best manner, of finest materials, wrapped in
tin foil, put up in separate box and sealed in accordance with League
Regulations. Warrented to last afull game without ripping or losing its
elasticity or shape.

PRICE, PER DOZEN, $15.00 PRICE, EACH, $1.50]





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